If you click on a link and make a purchase we may receive a small commission. Read our editorial policy.

Probst performing well as EA CEO

EA's CEO Larry Probst features in the latest report from financial website Forbes.com, taking home USD 12.9 million in total compensation and receiving a high ranking in the analysis of performance vs. pay.

EA's CEO Larry Probst features in the latest report from financial website Forbes.com, which reveals that he took home USD 12.9 million in total compensation last year, but gives him a high ranking in the analysis of performance vs. pay.

Due to its size and headquarter location, EA was the only games company to fit the demographic and feature in the annual report, which looks at salaries and non-salary related compensation (including stock and assets) of CEOs in the top 500 US companies.

According to the report, "The average pay cheque for last year for each boss works out to USD 10.9 million. For the group of 500 as a whole, aggregate stock gains accounted for 51 per cent of total compensation, versus 53 per cent in 2004. The average boss realized USD5.6 million from exercising options last year."

Probst, who has served as CEO of EA for the past fifteen years, and has also been president and COO since the resignation of John Riccitiello in 2004, was placed as the 114th highest paid executive in the top 500, taking home USD 12.59 million in total compensation in 2005 and netting an impressive USD 81.76 million over the past five years.

CEOs with at least a six-year pay history were also rated on performance versus pay, as measured by a composite ranking of sales, profits, assets and market value. Of the 189 eligible CEOs, Probst performed exceptionally well, placing 30th thanks to a six-year annual total return to shareholders of 23 per cent.

The survey, which can be viewed in more detail by visiting the Forbes.com website, revealed that America's top 500 companies' CEOs were paid USD 5.4 billion in 2005, receiving a collective pay increase of six per cent, which is markedly lower than the 54 per cent increase in 2004.

More News

Latest Articles