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Microsoft launches new 360 marketing blitz

Family, children and movies central to new marketing message in run up to Christmas

Microsoft has today launched a new advertising and marketing campaign for the Xbox 360 as it attempts to capture a wider audience in the run up to Christmas.

The campaign includes TV, print and billboard ads, cinema, radio and digital marketing, as well as a revamped Xbox.com website, and focuses on three key areas – family, children and movies.

"Today the world of entertainment has morphed and Xbox is at the heart of delivering not only amazing gaming experiences with first and third party core gamer marketing efforts, but also the broadest, most social entertainment offerings with Xbox Live, movies, music and a smashing Christmas games line-up," commented Stephen McGill, head of gaming for Xbox in the UK.

"With the single largest investment to date, we’re speaking to consumers through a fully integrated consumer marketing campaign aimed at reaching the casual and social segments. 

"It's an exciting  time for consumers to experience the entertaining world of  Xbox 360, and this campaign will embrace product experiences for all interests which celebrate people and tap into how consumers feel to create an emotional engagement with new audiences."

The new promotional push comes a week after Microsoft reduced the price of the console, which helped it clock up over six million sales in Europe.

Next week, the Xbox Live service will go offline for 24 hours while Microsoft prepares the system for the new Xbox Experience – a graphical overhaul and new online features – currently expected to go live in November.

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Matt Martin

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Matt Martin joined GamesIndustry in 2006 and was made editor of the site in 2008. With over ten years experience in journalism, he has written for multiple trade, consumer, contract and business-to-business publications in the games, retail and technology sectors.

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