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Clash of Clans daily revenue at $5.15 million - Hacker

Clash of Clans daily revenue at $5.15 million - Hacker

Tue 11 Feb 2014 4:58pm GMT / 11:58am EST / 8:58am PST
MobileSecurityFree-to-Play

Supercell internal figures apparently revealed after intruder gets access to company's social media management tool

Mobile gaming developer Supercell can make $5.15 million in a single a day, according to supposed internal sales data released by a hacker this week. A person with the handle Ethical Spectrum compromised the security for the company's Facebook accounts, and then circulated images of Supercell's internal audience and revenue figures.

According to images obtained by Re/code, Supercell's games (including clash of Clans, Hay Day, and Boom Beach) combined to bring in $5.15 million in revenue on February 7, with 29.4 million daily active users. Ethical Spectrum told the site that the hack was carried out as a sort of retribution.

"I tried to give them the advice of security, but [they] did not give me any attention," the hacker said. "So I gave them a lesson. ... Before I hack them, I found their CEO email address...No respond = hack."

It appears that the hack was possible because Ethical Spectrum gained unauthorized access to a social media management tool called Engagor. Engagor CEO Folke Lemaitre told the site that an individual gained control of a Supercell employee's email account, which was tied to the Engagor app, which was being used to manage Supercell's Facebook pages. The executive said Engagor shut down the account "within minutes," and that its own security had not been compromised.

Ethical Spectrum has since tweeted a snippet of an email supposedly from Supercell CEO Ilkka Paananen to employees telling them not to comment on the hack and to continue work as normal, because "if we spend all day thinking about this, then this hacker has won." Ethical Spectrum added that Supercell should "check your PC and e-mails," and said the attacks would stop for now.

Supercell had not responded to a request for comment as of this writing.

11 Comments

Julian Cram
Project Manager

49 27 0.6
This headline is a little misleading.
Supercell's games (including clash of Clans, Hay Day, and Boom Beach) combined to bring in $5.15 million

Posted:2 months ago

#1

Alfonso Sexto
Lead Tester

716 498 0.7
I find quite ironic the use of the name "Ethical Spectrum" by a supporter of the idea that the end justifies the means.

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Alfonso Sexto on 12th February 2014 12:42pm

Posted:2 months ago

#2

Craig Page
Programmer

381 216 0.6
I guess this answers the question of why so many games go with the Free 2 Play model, instead of just selling the complete game for $10.

If you look at the Google Play store, on the Top Grossing Games list, Clash of Clans is number 1, and everything after that is also free until you get to Minecraft at number 21 which is $6.99. Everyone's favorite game Dungeon Keeper is 33.

Posted:2 months ago

#3

Paul Johnson
Managing Director / Lead code monkey

787 931 1.2
Most mobile games that sell for $10 (or $1) won't even keep the lights on. In fact unless it's a truly epic brand, people won't even consider a $10 game.

The mass market has decided it prefers free to play. That's it really. Lots of talking heads don't like free to play and provide all sorts of inspired logic to defend their prejudices, but it all comes down to what the consumers want in the end.

Posted:2 months ago

#4

Justin Biddle
Software Developer

147 425 2.9
I'm a consumer and I don't prefer free to play

Posted:2 months ago

#5

Dave Smeathers
Senior Software Engineer

1 2 2.0
"Defend their prejudices" !? Tone it down a bit would you Paul.

This "inspired logic" is normally something along the lines of: "my game design doesn't fit the free to play model and I don't want to sacrifice the quality of the game".

Posted:2 months ago

#6

Sean LaBrie
Co-Founder & Lead Designer

2 4 2.0
I have to agree with Justin and Dave on this (as a consumer and developer, respectively). I've tried out a number of free to play games and they all gave me a similar sense that it was really just about my money and how they could talk me out of it. Perhaps my view would be different if I hadn't grown up in the Atari/NES era. I like the sense of 'owning' everything a game has to offer after I pay one set fee.

From the developer side, my biggest fear of delving into F2P is that I could end up producing a product which I wasn't 100% proud of due to the 'monetization tactics' that come with the business model. I'm certainly not saying that all F2P games are bad, nor that I won't try my hand at it one day, but I'm fairly jaded at this point.

Posted:2 months ago

#7

Paul Johnson
Managing Director / Lead code monkey

787 931 1.2
This "inspired logic" is normally something along the lines of: "my game design doesn't fit the free to play model and I don't want to sacrifice the quality of the game".
Exactly. That description is all about your game design. If you're making a game for you, then great. The "inspired logic" here is this: "I want to make a game this way, therefore customers should want to pay for it".

For the record, I'm not a fan either. We sell several prepaid games, and our one F2P game isn't doing as well as we'd hoped - I have absolutely no dog in this race. But I base my opinion on observed facts and knowledge, not a burning desire for things to be how I would prefer them.

Edited 2 times. Last edit by Paul Johnson on 13th February 2014 11:02pm

Posted:2 months ago

#8

Paul Johnson
Managing Director / Lead code monkey

787 931 1.2
For the uninitiated, here are some facts. Please spin these as hard as you can and come up with another explanation than mine of "nobody pays for mobile games anymore".

a) One year ago, our Great Big War Game title (a year old at that point) had slipped to around rank 100 in the iPad strategy chart and was earning us roughly $1,000 a day.

b) Today, Great Big War Game is earning us 10% of that at around $100 a day. But the chart position is still around 100.

Thank about b) a little. This earnings drop off has nothing to do with any "long tail" effects, "shelf life", "brand boredom" or anything else like that. If any of those kind of explanations were the reason, our chart position would have tanked along with our earnings.

There is one and only one projection you can make from those two stats, and that is that for us to keep our chart position but see our earnings drop by 91%, the same thing has happened to everyone above us. And by extension, everyone below us. ie all mobile games. And I've checked - many developers report the same phenomenon.

Unless you have a major publisher pushing hard, or an epic brand - and I mean Zelda here - you will not be making a profit from selling a prepaid mobile game. There will be exceptions of course, but aiming for exceptions is the preserve of dreamers and idiots imo.

Posted:2 months ago

#9

Tudor Nita
C++ Multiplayer Programmer

23 26 1.1
Although F2P is a complete no-go from my game consumer POV, I tend to share Paul's take on this. A fair number of my developer acquaintances from the prepaid mobile sector are reporting fairly similar situations.

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Tudor Nita on 15th February 2014 7:14pm

Posted:2 months ago

#10

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