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No Man's Sky delay results in death threats for dev

Will launch in North America on August 9

No Man's Sky has been officially delayed for PlayStation 4 and PC, Sony announced on Friday. Since then indie development studio Hello Games has reported receiving death threats.

Other developers have come out in support of Hello Games, notably creative director for Dragon Age Mike Laidlaw and game designer Nina Freeman.

No Man's Sky will launch in North America on August 9, in Europe territories on August 10, and in the UK on August 12.

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Latest comments (11)

Adam Campbell Game Production Manager, AzoomeeA year ago
Umm, why are people sending death threats?
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Morville O'Driscoll Blogger & Critic A year ago
Jason Schreier (who wrote the Kotaku article breaking the news) has also received threats of violence on Twitter.
Umm, why are people sending death threats?
Catch 22 in all its glory! Release on time with a buggy or poor product, receive abuse. Delay to iron out bugs and make sure feature complete, receive abuse.

Nope, I don't get it either.
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Thomas Kennedy Unemployed (Seeking work) A year ago
This is the unfortunate consequence of the internet.

That said - And this is a personal opinion - Those who are sending a dev death threats over delaying a game need to get their heads checked out, they're hurling abuse at something that, at the end of the day, will mean nothing down the line of life
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Show all comments (11)
Robert Bantin Principal Programmer, CodemastersA year ago
You know you've made it in this industry when gamers are issuing a fatwa on you for delaying your game's release date. I'm sure Hello Games is laughing their collective heads off about it. After all, the only bad press you can get is in an obituary.
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Bonnie Patterson Narrative Designer, Writer A year ago
Hopefully the barrage won't get too intense or depressing for Mr Murray and the other folks at Hello Games, and I definitely hope none of them are serious. I really do recommend having someone else filter your messages until the ASBOs find somewhere else to go display how powerful they are - they can pick out messages with useful feedback or content and while you might just be shedding it all like water off a duck's back right now (or you might not, and that's OK), barrages of hate mail can make anyone feel depressed if they go on long enough.

Meanwhile, I'm just going to use the extra time to enhance the "launch day nest" I am building to play it in with my fella when it finally comes out.

Best wishes, Hello folks :)
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Andrew Watson Tools Programmer A year ago
I think this is mostly due to the massive amount of hype this game is getting. I feel like people are vastly overestimating the scope of this game.
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Greg Wilcox Creator, Destroy All Fanboys! A year ago
Well, one of the folks who made a threat was all "this is the only thing I live for", which means he or she needs professional help, stat. Great game or not, it's NOT (and nothing is) worth making a damn death threat over.

That said, yep, I'm excited about NMS, but will play it when I can afford to pick it up. Being old makes me patient and delays on games this expansive are to be expected.

@Andrew: Question for you: If the people with the threats end up hating the game they so desperately want to be the game they think it's supposed to be, then what happens? Hype really has nothing to do with the agitated mental state of a handful of gamers (or anyone) who turn from interested fans to more rabid fans to potential threats to one's safety (even their own).

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Greg Wilcox on 1st June 2016 4:44am

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Andrew Watson Tools Programmer A year ago
@Greg
If the people with the threats end up hating the game they so desperately want to be the game they think it's supposed to be, then what happens?
Then they end up disappointed and angry through nobody's fault but their own.
Hype really has nothing to do with the agitated mental state of a handful of gamers (or anyone) who turn from interested fans to more rabid fans to potential threats to one's safety (even their own).
Isn't that just the effects of extreme levels of self-inflicted hype?
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Klaus Preisinger Freelance Writing A year ago
Nobody question the rational of gamers when they are supposed to preorder or even prepurchase games of which they know little more than a CGI trailer and confessional videos by PR about how much fun playing the game will be. One could say, the entire idea of video gaming PR is to increase the average irrationality of people consuming games.

Yet irrationality comes in two flavors. Developers can laugh, when customers invent excuses for each other in social media. But in the end, irrationality will be irrational in every direction. Death threads seem more like a logical conclusion than anything else.
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Bonnie Patterson Narrative Designer, Writer A year ago
If you want a game to be successful - or even just to make back the money you spent making it - you have to promote it. No promotion = no sales.

Which is probably why nobody voted to have a large, self-elected body of Hype Police.

This type of behaviour is far more about proving something to the perpetrator's "tribe members" than about communicating with the devs anyway. It's about saying "Look how powerful I am. I am not afraid of this guy." And there's an intricate web of social pressures and root causes underneath all that, but there is always a choice.

There is always the option to just not do something one knows is solely intended to cause someone else grief.
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Andrew Watson Tools Programmer A year ago
@Bonnie
This type of behaviour is far more about proving something to the perpetrator's "tribe members" than about communicating with the devs anyway.
I think it's less that, and more that places like twitter have more of a culture based around hyperbole. Everything gets exaggerated.
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