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Take-Two "very pleased" with Evolve sales

President Karl Slatoff says digital revenues, attach rate for Season Pass have been very strong

Expectations were high for Take-Two Interactive's Evolve when it launched last month, but the initial reception has been a bit mixed. The PC version of the game sits at a 77 Metacritic score, and while it was the best-selling game of the week upon its release in the UK, it quickly slipped down the charts and now resides just inside the top 10.

Speaking at the Piper Jaffray Technology, Media, and Telecommunications Conference today, Take-Two president Karl Slatoff said the company is happy with that performance. His comments also suggested that the game's extensive downloadable content plans have been well received commercially.

"When we first picked up Evolve... our instincts told us we had something really special," Slatoff said. "And as the game evolved--I guess the pun is sort of intended--but I think our instincts have proven out right. We're very pleased. We've had an incredibly successful commercial launch with Evolve. We're very happy where things are going, particularly on the digital side. Digital has been very strong for us, not only with full game downloads but also the attach rate for our season pass has been very strong. I'm not going to give you specific numbers but we're very pleased with those. So I would say in general, Evolve has been a fantastic experience for us and we're very pleased with it."

Later in the presentation, Slatoff was asked if the transition to digital is happening as quickly as Take-Two would like.

"It's not really a question of wanting it go in that direction," he responded. "I think it's going to go there whether we like it or not. It's clearly moving in that direction, although maybe not necessarily at the pace people think it's moving."

Slatoff acknowledged that there are some advantages to digital games--higher margins, no used games, unlimited shelf space--but added the publisher was happy having a physical market as long as the consumers wanted it.

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Latest comments (3)

Morville O'Driscoll Blogger & Critic A year ago
Digital has been very strong for us, not only with full game downloads but also the attach rate for our season pass has been very strong. I'm not going to give you specific numbers but we're very pleased with those.
For context, Evolve on PC is a Steamworks game. Steam Stats as of 16:34 GMT today:
Current Players 3,001
30-Day Avg. 7,037.0
30-Day Gain -1,993.6
30-Day % Gain -22.08%
Whilst I can appreciate the financial success of the ratio of DLC bought, and this is only PC, I would be wary of putting too much stock in what was said.

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Morville O'Driscoll on 11th March 2015 4:37pm

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Paolo Giunti Narrative Designer A year ago
The diminishing population isn't surprising.
Evolve has some very solid mechanics but, due to its forced online nature, game experience varies greatly depending on who you're playing with/against. This makes Evolve an absolute blast if you're playing with your friends and generally quite the opposite if you play with random strangers.
Unfortunately not everyone has 4 friends readily available whenever they feel like playing Evolve and many would rather play something else than going for a match they know they probably won't enjoy.

I think Evolve could use a non-competitive PvE mode to allow players to learn to work together at their own pace (which is something that L4D offered), otherwise I think the population will keep shrinking down to just the hardcore fans.
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Andreia Quinta Creative & People Photographer, Studio52 LondonA year ago
I think Evolve could use a non-competitive PvE mode to allow players to learn to work together at their own pace (which is something that L4D offered)
This is precisely what I thought it was missing that Left 4 Dead had from day 1. I understand the concept of the game, dangerous settings and different types of animals, the thrill of the hunt, but I don't think it was well executed, so I find myself not enjoying it as it always seems rushed, there's no immersion into the actual "hunt".

The monsters are too easy to track down and you end up always being on their heels just 30 seconds to 3 minutes after you land, even if the monster player is good the entire session seems to be running around the map with small bursts of fight. Players end up ignoring the rest of the fauna as "you're killing animals for the monster to eat" - ergo making it harder for the hunter team, regardless of the buffs that some of this "trash" fauna might give. Killing fauna is a regarded as a waste of time because you're not pursuing the monster.
At least with left 4 dead in expert mode a full map session could last from 1:30h to 3h, it was excruciating some times but if you got to the end it felt you accomplished something, friends or randoms.
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