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Mattrick's $50 million welcome from Zynga laid bare

Mattrick's $50 million welcome from Zynga laid bare

Thu 04 Jul 2013 6:54am GMT / 2:54am EDT / 11:54pm PDT
PeopleJobs

$5m signing bonus, base salary of $1m, $40m in stock options

Don Mattrick's substantial remuneration from his new employer Zynga has been made public in a SEC filing by the social gaming company, revealing a package worth around $50 million.

That deal includes a one-off signing bonus of $5 million, a flat annual salary of $1m and an incredible $40 million in stock options, $25 million of which is vested over three years, $15 million over five. Mattrick's bonus threshold for year one is a maximum of 400 per cent of his salary.

In addition to this, Mattrick will become eligible for a further $7 million in additional stock options every year from 2014 onward, according to performance based review by a committee.

Although the new CEO is being compensated "for his forfeiture of compensation from his previous employer," it's likely that he'll also be receiving a payout from Redmond to mark the end of his six-year tenure at the publisher. Microsoft has not revealed any details of its side of the deal.

The wage marks a sharp increase from that of outgoing CEO Mark Pincus, who reduced his own salary to $1 in April - largely in response to spreading shareholder panic and a shrinking market share. Pincus remains with Zynga as Chairman of the Board and Chief Product Officer.

64 Comments

Sam Brown Programmer, Cool Games Ltd.

235 164 0.7
Sigh. And yet, the people making the most critically acclaimed games these days are usually tiny indie teams selling on Steam. Says it all really. O_o

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Sam Brown on 4th July 2013 10:13am

Posted:A year ago

#1

Dan Howdle Head of Content, Existent

280 810 2.9
Popular Comment
I shall restrain myself and not put forward my belief that accepting a wage this large is evil.

No, I definitely won't say that.

Posted:A year ago

#2

Anthony Gowland Lead Designer, Outplay Entertainment

195 652 3.3
@sam It says you have quite the perspective bias there! Here are the year's most critically acclaimed games. The highest indies are also iOS releases, not Steam http://www.metacritic.com/browse/games/score/metascore/year/all?view=condensed&sort=desc

Posted:A year ago

#3

Andrew Animator

148 158 1.1

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Andrew on 4th July 2013 11:30am

Posted:A year ago

#4






A need for accountability and responsibility not only in the executive cubicles, but also from those reporting them is needed or we will keep seeing this 'Twenty Year Spiral' of failure repeat itself!

Edited 1 times. Last edit by kevin williams on 4th July 2013 11:54am

Posted:A year ago

#5
...after we contacted Zynga to confirm the loophole - which they tell us was "rare", and only occurred on "select internal server error screens"
Thy name is arrogance!

Edited 1 times. Last edit by kevin williams on 4th July 2013 12:00pm

Posted:A year ago

#6

Jack Pochop Studying Telecommunications, Indiana University

27 16 0.6
Interesting...I wonder how much he was making at Microsoft? This whole thing still bewilders me, but whatever.

Posted:A year ago

#7

Sam Brown Programmer, Cool Games Ltd.

235 164 0.7
@Anthony: Sorry, that wasn't a dig at iOS, it was just the first indie distro that came to mind when writing my snarky comment. I'll edit it to include "et al" after it if you like. ;)

Posted:A year ago

#8

Sam Spain Studying computer Science (Games Development), The University of Hull

17 3 0.2
That is a disgusting amount of money.

Posted:A year ago

#9

Bruce Everiss Marketing Consultant

1,692 594 0.4
If you can get it............
I know vastly less able people in our industry on equally silly packages.
Zynga is a big company with nearly 3,000 staff, over $1,000 million in annual revenue, $2,500 million in assets, 118 million monthly active users and 15.1 million daily active users.
Mattrick in is a position where he can (and probably will) make a huge amount of money for shareholders. So he deserves to be compensated accordingly.

Posted:A year ago

#10

Andrew Animator

148 158 1.1
So he deserves to be compensated accordingly.
That all depends on your definition of "accordingly". I wonder how the boots on the ground feel about this, are their efforts rewarded equally "accordingly"??

Posted:A year ago

#11
Popular Comment
@Kevin - The guy did set up his own company at 17 that was acquired by EA where he worked for over 20 rising to President of Worldwide Studios years before Microsoft.

Sounds like they hired someone with real gaming experience. As for the money. Bloody hell what's there to say. I think we're all a bit jealous.

Posted:A year ago

#12

Sam Brown Programmer, Cool Games Ltd.

235 164 0.7
do begin to ponder the distribution of wealth at the mention of $1,000,000 salaries and $5,000,000 bonuses for executives. ^__^

Edited 3 times. Last edit by Sam Brown on 4th July 2013 2:36pm

Posted:A year ago

#13

Bruce Everiss Marketing Consultant

1,692 594 0.4
@Sam Browne

The salary is $1 million. Less than CEOs of smaller and less successful companies in our industry.
Most of his "package" is performance related.

Posted:A year ago

#14

Sam Brown Programmer, Cool Games Ltd.

235 164 0.7
I know, I know (you guys did see the smiley at the end of that last post, yes? ^__^ )

Andreas, you touch on a point I'd like to expand on, motivation: This is a creative industry, and my personal belief is that if you don't want to be in it for the work, because you enjoy it, then you shouldn't be here. No-one should be making games just to make money. If I can pay the bills, put something aside for retirement (hah!) and not have to buy the cheap stuff in the supermarket, then I'm happy. Therefore silly salaries should be unnecessary. The amount of money you make should be no measure whatsoever of your achievements (not that that stops us doing exactly that here, of course... ;) )



Mind you, if they had really wanted to motivate him, they could have paid him entirely in stock and not handed over any real money at all. ;)

Edited 3 times. Last edit by Sam Brown on 4th July 2013 3:00pm

Posted:A year ago

#15

Bruce Everiss Marketing Consultant

1,692 594 0.4
Bill Gates had a dream. To put a computer on every desktop and in every home. He realised this dream and changed the world. In doing so he became eye wateringly rich. Worth more than some countries.
So what? He generate vastly more wealth than he received. He made huge numbers of people rich.

In Britain we have a culture of envy. Successful people (say, bankers) should be punished for generating wealth for society. And nobody should be paid more than anyone else, no matter how deserving. It makes me sick. They want trickle up poverty.

If someone in our industry has talents, enterprise, knowledge and hard work that can generate billions then they should be accordingly rewarded. Film stars, bankers etc who generate vast wealth get rewarded properly, why not people in the game industry.

What annoys me is when I see people doing a very bad job and being paid an enormous salary. They are damaging the industry and being rewarded for it.

Posted:A year ago

#16

Sam Brown Programmer, Cool Games Ltd.

235 164 0.7
Popular Comment
@Bruce: My reward is knowing people play my games and like them. Having someone come up to me and tell me that one of mine was the best game they'd ever played, or some piece of tech I wrote made their job so much easier is what I do this for. Yes, I know that makes me sound like a socialist narcissist hippy. No, I don't care if it does. ^__^

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Sam Brown on 4th July 2013 3:21pm

Posted:A year ago

#17

Russell Watson Senior Designer, Born Ready Games

86 34 0.4
Popular Comment
@Bruce

You lost me when you started talking about Bankers.

Posted:A year ago

#18

Rick Lopez Illustrator, Graphic Designer

1,269 942 0.7
What sucks about all this is that the people who actually make the games dont seem to be making this much. As far as they are concerned, they arent making money. And with evidence of so many layoffs and developers closing zhop, i cant see it as unreal. The gaming industry surely does move money, but were does it all go? Not to the people who make the games. The way I see it, this has nothing to do with making games. Like I said before and Ill say it again. Zynga isnt about games, its just about filling the pockets of an elite few, while leaving everyone else out in the cold. Don Mattrick is set for life, with that kinda money.

Posted:A year ago

#19

Martin Klima Executive Producer, Warhorse Studios

26 50 1.9
@Bruce: I find myself agreeing with you, an unusual thing. I would only add that this culture of envy (we may as well call it egalitarianism) is not limited to England, but common to most European countries.

Posted:A year ago

#20

Andrew Animator

148 158 1.1
@Bruce. Of course everyone deserves compensation equal to their talents and no one will dispute that, the problem however (and this applied to bankers equally) is that wealth is rarely distributed fairly. To see an individual paid vast sums of money in a struggling company, working in an industry which typically does not pay highly is morally reprehensible.

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Andrew on 4th July 2013 4:00pm

Posted:A year ago

#21

Adam Campbell Associate Producer, Miniclip Ltd

1,179 967 0.8
I don't have a personal comment on this article but I think this point from Alex is important.
everyone deserves compensation equal to their talents and no one will dispute that, the problem however (and this applied to bankers equally) is that wealth is rarely distributed fairly.

Posted:A year ago

#22

Bruce Everiss Marketing Consultant

1,692 594 0.4
@Alex O'Dwyer

Wealth is not distributed evenly. Otherwise there would be no point in working. Go to Cuba and see the results. Then go to Hong Kong (which was much poorer than Cuba) and see the effect of rewarding wealth generators.

Top executives in big global companies make thousands of millions of pounds of difference in shareholder returns (your pension). So paying them tens of millions is pretty cheap.

Posted:A year ago

#23

Christopher Garratty European Counsel, Electronic Arts

83 98 1.2
I would love to know how these top tier execs are actually valued. How is he personally going to bring tens of millions into the company thereby justifying the amount of money spent on him?

I genuinely have no idea what a CEO does, let alone how it can be worth so much money. His "signing bonus" alone means that he will get more money for writing his name on a contract than most people will ever make in their lives so the job he's doing has got to be pretty special right?

Posted:A year ago

#24

Dan Howdle Head of Content, Existent

280 810 2.9
There is no moral justification for accepting a salary that's three thousand times that of a careworker, say, unless your reality is solipsistic in the absolute. Or if Ayn Rand is, to you, anything other than morally reprehensible claptrap.

That is, of course, just my opinion.

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Dan Howdle on 4th July 2013 4:18pm

Posted:A year ago

#25

Andrew Animator

148 158 1.1
Otherwise there would be no point in working
I'll just refer you back to Sams earlier comment.

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Andrew on 4th July 2013 4:26pm

Posted:A year ago

#26

Pablo Santos Developer

23 18 0.8
Well, it would not be called "capitalism" if the wealth were to be shared equally, and I think no one is saying that, Bruce.
While I agree that earnings *should* be different (and in some cases this difference should be big), I don't think "big" should mean that many orders of magnitude. ;-)

Posted:A year ago

#27

Adam Campbell Associate Producer, Miniclip Ltd

1,179 967 0.8
I once went to a talk/debate featuring a top UK politician on the cabinet, it was about responsible capitalism.

Bruce's comment has brought it all back to me, there seems to be a real problem in the way people value money. Its not wrong to make a fortune but to suggest that "10s of Millions" is cheap is in fact obscene. This all ties in to boom and bust companies and markets, types of work contract, lay offs, salary rates and more, usually affecting the every day man or woman trying to survive.

Nobody is asking for or expecting a communism here, we are looking at the situation relative to the company, the type of industry and perhaps even the major job cuts of late.

Earlier I said I didn't really have a comment on his salary, which I don't really want to make, but I can't avoid a comment that aims to devalue money in order to make your argument look good.

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Adam Campbell on 4th July 2013 7:02pm

Posted:A year ago

#28

Patrick Frost QA Project Monitor

400 196 0.5
Can we stop saying things like: "he earned them $x million", please. No one man in a project or on a team has that level of influence and it completely discredits all who work with them.

Posted:A year ago

#29
The hijacking of this discussion to fixate on the amount of money and one individuals ability to warrant this - has swiftly avoided the issue of the morality, and also the business sense.

As part of a team - this individual will not generate this amount in the time period for the rewarded shares - and the big question, if the company dose fail, will he forfeit this amount?

Posted:A year ago

#30

Tim Carter Designer - Writer - Producer

574 317 0.6
Tell me an actual... yiou know... GAME DESIGNER... theose guys who actually make the f*cking games... who gets paid that much.

Posted:A year ago

#31

Tim Carter Designer - Writer - Producer

574 317 0.6
It isn't evil.

Zynga is public and they are rollibng in dough.

What IS EVIL is that core creatives aren't making this much.

Posted:A year ago

#32

Tim Carter Designer - Writer - Producer

574 317 0.6
@kevin wiliams...

Stop tearing Mattrick down.

Zynga has billions in the bank. They can afford it.

What yiou should be doing is screaming bloody murder that the DESIGNERS aren't making the same amount.

Posted:A year ago

#33
@Tim -
You What.....? How can...
....The hijacking of this discussion to fixate on the amount of money and one individuals ability to warrant this - has swiftly avoided the issue of the morality, and also the business sense.
...be construed as tearing him down!
I have commented on his employment history, and questions about his long term involvement in a project that has not completed to launch yet! If he is a connection of yours - I am sorry to make you feel uncomfortable - these are the facts. I want to focus on the ethics not on the individual - trying and use the name of the person as little as possible.

On the point you raise about the 'designers' - I am complaining that the suits have created a little gang (clique) for themselves to ensure they protect each others backs, hide mistakes and incompetence, pressure certain publishers, and agree to inflate their wages / benefits and pay themselves at the detriment of others. If you go over and look at the comments I raised about the Infogrames/Atari situation - and how some of those duplicitous in its collapse are now linked to PS4 to XBone perpetuating the same incompetence - you may eat your words.

Come on Tim - keep focused on the discussion and leave the trolling at home!

Posted:A year ago

#34

Bruce Everiss Marketing Consultant

1,692 594 0.4
@kevin williams

This clique of suits, are they Jewish Mafia or Freemasons? Obviously we all need tinfoil hats.
If what you say is right then how come John Riccitiello lost his job?

Posted:A year ago

#35

Sam Brown Programmer, Cool Games Ltd.

235 164 0.7
Finally remembered the quote I've been trying to think of all day (apologies if I'm derailing the discussion again here Kevin, not my intent ;) ). It's from Stark by Ben Elton and sums up what I was trying to say about wealth being meaningless after a certain point:
But on the whole those thrills were history for [him]. He had had to learn the hard way that the difference between being poor and not being poor is far greater than the difference between being rich and being stupidly rich. Being able to own a swimming pool is physical pleasure, being able to own hundreds of them is just an abstract idea. [He] had only one d---, only one stomach. There was only so much he could do for them, and yet each day he worked harder and harder to get more of what he didn't need and couldn't use.

Edited 2 times. Last edit by Sam Brown on 4th July 2013 11:53pm

Posted:A year ago

#36

Steve Peterson West Coast Editor, GamesIndustry.biz

108 73 0.7
Mattrick's compensation is mostly in stock, or options to buy stock, and that's not worth much unless he boosts the stock price. MY reading of the SEC filing shows that he'll be getting somewhere around 15 million shares, which at current value is about $45 million. Most of that is in options, not grants, so he only realizes an upside on the options if Zynga stock is worth more than the option price (and a fair chunk more in order to cover taxes). If Zynga stock stays around $3, Mattrick will still get his $1 million salary and $5 million signing bonus, and some millions more form the outright stock grants; but that may in fact not be more than he would have gained by staying at Microsoft. Mattrick's big payday will only happen if he can raise Zynga's stock price substantially. If, for instance, he gets Zynga stock to hit $10 again (where it was when first issued), his options would be worth around $120 million. Of course, if he did that, the company's overall value to investors would have grown by $5 billion or so.

This does not address the issue of what is reasonable compensation for a CEO relative to workers, but I think all Zynga employees have stock options so they would benefit as well from a substantial rise in share price. At least, though, unlike some corporate CEOs, Mattrick gets a massive payout only if the company's share price climbs so all investors benefit.

Posted:A year ago

#37

Paul Jace Merchandiser

936 1,412 1.5
In Britain we have a culture of envy.
We have that in America too but here we just call them "haters" . Mattrick seems to have alot of those but to be honest I wouldn't mind personally. If the worst thing I could say about my $50 million salary/incentive package is that people on an internet forum made negative comments about me then, well I'd probably have a pretty great life:)

Posted:A year ago

#38
@Bruce -
This clique of suits, are they Jewish Mafia or Freemasons? Obviously we all need tinfoil hats.
An example of arrogance at its height is seen in three phases - first denial (that there is a problem), then dismissal (of the problem being that bad), and finally derision (attacking those that question).

I will leave you to your derision of my comments, attempting to allude of being a "looney" - but you of all people should watch that short-sightedness.

Anyone that lived through the 1980's video game birth should be aware of the "suits" that squandered the opportunity and derailed the business, paying ludicrous amounts to themselves and their cliques - as one of those that was on the outside while those at Ocean, US Gold, Mirrorsoft and others manipulated the price of games, and distribution - stole IP and peoples work - I was in the room when Ocean's assets were sold to Infogrames - half of which they did not even own!

Though having been part of the mess that was Imagine Games, I suppose for you its easy to be adverse to tweak the tail of those that crushed your efforts!

Edited 1 times. Last edit by kevin williams on 5th July 2013 1:29am

Posted:A year ago

#39

Todd Weidner Founder, Big Daddy Game Studio

412 981 2.4
Popular Comment
@Russelll I have to admit that
@Bruce

You lost me when you started talking about Bankers.
this made me laugh as well. Having worked on wall street, this comment as you point out, is just absurd. Manipulation and extraction is not creation.

So I guess when the market corrects itself, as it will do in major way once all the central banks reign in their printing presses, and literally trillions of dollars will evaporate over the course of a few months, I guess we can expect all these suits to stop cashing their paychecks?
Please, these suits do not, and are not worth this kind of money. They are not some sort of rare genius, far from it. Just capitalistic vultures for the most part.

Posted:A year ago

#40

Gary LaRochelle Digital Artist/Game Designer, Flea Ranch Games

64 55 0.9
If he can get Pincus to stop copying games and come out with some original games, he's worth it.

Posted:A year ago

#41

Bruce Everiss Marketing Consultant

1,692 594 0.4
Andy Murray will nett $75 million if he wins Wimbledon: http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2013-07-04/murray-seen-netting-75-million-by-ending-u-k-s-wimbledon-wait.html
For one game of tennis!

Posted:A year ago

#42
Well zooming out from the the business 'world', objectively if any human on earth is worth less than $1 a day, then no human on earth is worth $50m. "Balls! S/he's an exceptional leader creating wealth & opportunities for progress and and and ...". Yeah whatever, some people use just as much brain power and vision building exceptional train sets or working out the properties of physics. It's never healthy to fawn over a narcissist, best to treat business for what it is - just another transient hobby to keep us dancing while we figure out this whole evolved-apes thing. Y'know like golf or tiddlywinks.

Posted:A year ago

#43

David Serrano Freelancer

300 272 0.9
This is why tax rates for public companies should be linked to executive compensation.

Posted:A year ago

#44

Richard Westmoreland Game Desginer, Exient Ltd

138 90 0.7
I'm slightly confused here, simply by joining the company he's made enough money to not be accountable for his performance. He could leave now and never have to work another day in his life and his have a good standard of living.

The Francis video made me laugh "It's like hiring the pilot of the Hindenburg to captain the Titanic"

Posted:A year ago

#45

Mark Dygert Lead Character Animator, Her Interactive

21 24 1.1
I wonder how many people they had to lay off to make that happen...

Posted:A year ago

#46
Oh @Bruce - how well you make a argument!

-Murry, $75m -for win at Worlds premier event
-President, (Bush) earned $115,345 annually -for running a country


But the big difference is accountability and responsibility - in other words, when they fail they are responsible, not top loaded with a huge amount that has now even got the investors of the new company asking serious questions... so Bruce even the investors are questioning what you feel is fine! Least they are not hiding exotic cars at M1 service stations?

Will not mention the man and how he generated his money, but it is interesting to see how he spends it:
http://www.fastcompany.com/3013767/don-mattrick

May explain why he needs so much to keep this standard of living!

Posted:A year ago

#47
An example of how some directors fell foul of the dirty payment culture in the 1980's:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yt9BsZCifgU

Rush too 18:10 timeframe :)

Posted:A year ago

#48

Keldon Alleyne Handheld Developer, Avasopht Ltd

449 422 0.9
Wealth is not distributed evenly. Otherwise there would be no point in working.
Distributing wealth *more evenly doesn't mean the removal of incentives to work. Wealth can be distributed more evenly without total communism and while still rewarding innovators, however *completely free market provides absolutely no incentive to do so since you can always make much more money finding new ways to reduce your spend on wages.

In economics there are no silver bullets. When we have completely removed poverty and exploitation then we can stick a giant flag pole in the ground and consider ourselves truly intelligent. Until then I guess the best we can do is either learn more about solving this problem or just pick sides and yell loudly.

*: edit

Edited 2 times. Last edit by Keldon Alleyne on 5th July 2013 8:56pm

Posted:A year ago

#49

Nick McCrea Gentleman, Pocket Starship

186 286 1.5
You only have to look at the pattern of rising executive compensation relative to both worker compensation and corporate profit to see that there's a lot more at work here than simply 'rewarding value'. CEO comp outstrips worker compensation by a factor of 400 - it was 20 in 1965. CEO pay has risen by 8.5% year on year for the past decade, in comparison to profit growth of 2.9%.

This is not simply rewarding value. It's a clue that there is distortion in the market, and that the executive class is rent seeking to some degree.

I don't have anything morally against huge pay, but I think an inquisitive mind has to question the assumption that they simply just deserve it.

Posted:A year ago

#50

Bruce Everiss Marketing Consultant

1,692 594 0.4
The Economist is an excellent, erudite and well informed newspaper. Yesterday's issue has an article on this very subject which is quite interesting: http://www.economist.com/news/business/21580473-casual-gamings-fallen-star-hires-new-boss-microsoft-doghouse

Posted:A year ago

#51
From The Economist Feature
...To hit that jackpot he will have to pull off a hat-trick. First, he must show he can work smoothly with Mr Pincus, who may find it hard to relinquish control. He must find blockbuster mobile games to counter the threat posed by upstarts like King.com. And he will have to steer Zynga into new markets. The firm is eyeing online poker and casino games played for real money, and is experimenting with these in Britain.
Ouch! No small amount of easy milestones to validate the worth of the high package... unless he was part of a large team and there was no dates set next to achieving these objectives to warrant the full $50m!!!

Also the move into the online poker / casino sector is a total re-structuring of the operation and is littered with obstacles - desperation breads confusion.

Posted:A year ago

#52

Keldon Alleyne Handheld Developer, Avasopht Ltd

449 422 0.9
Maybe I'm playing devil's advocate but just say this goes belly up, he'd be the perfect scape goat!

I'm curious about what exactly he will do to justify all of this. Will he revolutionise gaming? Will he bring a new level of innovation we've all been waiting for? Does he have something up his sleeve? Surely Zynga must have a reason for such a generous offering.

So we could be in for either a massive revolutionary surprise or a very public lynching of a CEO.

Posted:A year ago

#53

Aaron Brown BA Computer Science Student, Carnegie Mellon University

56 21 0.4
@Sam Brown

Enjoy all of the compliments that you can get. Money is the ultimate form of compensation, recognition, and appreciation for a persons efforts and efficacy. It is not evil. People are evil, Money is inherently good.

Edited 2 times. Last edit by Aaron Brown on 7th July 2013 5:17pm

Posted:A year ago

#54

Bruce Everiss Marketing Consultant

1,692 594 0.4
From Wikipedia:

Mattrick was best known at EA for having helped bring to life such celebrated game franchises as Need for Speed, Harry Potter and The Sims.

and

In the six years since Mattrick has overseen the division, the Xbox 360 installed base has grown from 10 million to more than 76 million worldwide, while the Xbox LIVE membership has increased from 6 million to over 48 million.[7][8] At the same time Mattrick is recognized for moving the interactive business from an operating loss into a sustained and profitable business for the company.

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Bruce Everiss on 8th July 2013 9:16am

Posted:A year ago

#55
In some civilizations, money probably doesnt exist.
Sometimes you have to wonder at the culture of envy, over fiat currency which is just digital zeros and numbers worth absolutely..relatively piffle. Sure it allows us to buy services rendered unto others, various creature comforts, and the illusion of wealth but thats all it really is.

Making a legendary good game on the other hand, requires loads of hammers and tongs...

Posted:A year ago

#56

Keldon Alleyne Handheld Developer, Avasopht Ltd

449 422 0.9
@Dr. Chee, trade is trade. Money is simply a mechanism for it.

I do believe that an ignorance of economics really plays against the poorest. I just know so many intelligent people who are selling themselves short simply because they are unaware. Also the lack of entrepreneurship as a whole has no doubt been a core factor in how our economy is shaped now.

But it's headlines like this that makes me thing that maybe I got into the wrong business. It is something to think about as you school your children for tomorrow's world.

Posted:A year ago

#57

Christopher Thigpen Lead Producer, Kiz Studios

47 92 2.0
Disgusting.

Put the money into your development teams.

Posted:A year ago

#58

Aaron Brown BA Computer Science Student, Carnegie Mellon University

56 21 0.4
@Christopher Thigpen
Disgusting.

Put the money into your development teams.
No sir. Invest the money in a great mind that can effectively navigate the tricky terrain in front of Zynga.

Direction is far more crucial than development.
Direction will attract top tier technical talent.
Direction will lead to trickle down wealth for development teams.

Posted:A year ago

#59

Christopher Thigpen Lead Producer, Kiz Studios

47 92 2.0
You are kidding right?

Posted:A year ago

#60

Aaron Brown BA Computer Science Student, Carnegie Mellon University

56 21 0.4
@Christopher Thigpen

No, I am not kidding. I'll admit that my previous comment was ineffective rhetorically, but I am not kidding.

Zynga has been stumbling for a while now and they need someone to steer the ship. Insert Don Mattrick. He is proven and well worth his weight.

They already have talented developers in house, and they pay them well. If he proves to be a success, everyone working at Zynga will benefit.

What would splashing the money on the dev teams accomplish?

Edited 2 times. Last edit by Aaron Brown on 9th July 2013 5:14pm

Posted:A year ago

#61
@Bruce and @Kevin - Unfortunately you're both right in regards to capitalism. Bruce has an idealistic view that capitalism encourages wealth creators and non everyone is as valuable and replaceable as each other therefore some warrant higher salaries. Lionel Messi shouldn't be paid the same amount as Phil Neville.

However there definitely is a "clique of suits". Once you get to the level of director there is a sense that from then on it's a gravy train that doesn't really warrant your "value" to the company and directors all sit on each other's boards and soak up all the profits neither giving them back to the shareholders or investing in the employees.

Unfortunately that seems to be the way of things, those that decide who gets the money tend to pay themselves the most. It doesn't matter whether it's capitalism, socialism, theology based system or even when your boss is deciding everyone's Christmas bonus.

At lease capitalism gives people the chance to break into the elite.

Posted:A year ago

#62

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