Close
Are you sure? Are you sure you want to report this comment? I understand, report it. Cancel

Console gaming is "dying" says Angry Birds boss

Mon 14 Mar 2011 8:27am GMT / 4:27am EDT / 1:27am PDT
MobileCasualDevelopment

Rovio head rails against "casual games" label and home console pricing model

Rovio's Peter Vesterbacka has claimed that console games are "dying", as he criticised both the full price console games model and the "casual" games label.

Speaking at the South by Southwest Interactive conference, as reported by VentureBeat, Vesterbacka claimed that innovation in the industry was now focused on mobile and social gaming.

Vesterbacka suggested this was because mobile games developer are more "nimble" and able to develop and release new content more quickly. The current pricing model for home console games came in for particular criticism, especially given the difficulty in upgrading the games.

The Rovio boss also complained about the label "casual games", arguing that Angry Birds was just as involving and addictive as any other.

On the subject of a business model for mobile gaming Vesterbacka admitted that, "No one has figured it out yet." He suggested that Rovio would continue to experiment with different models for different games.

Rovio has now seen 100 million downloads for Angry Birds, the majority of which are for the free version of the game. The company also recently announced a $42 million funding deal led by venture capitalist firm Accel Partners.

68 Comments

Ilja Goossens
Licensing and Publishing Manager

2 0 0.0
Funny that they now suddenly are Gurus on every gaming subject because they have made a huge number selling mediocre game!

Posted:3 years ago

#1

David Amirian
Writer

59 3 0.1
and thats why they're making angry birds playable on the ps3?


there's a time and place for different games. mobile games may be getting larger, but there will always be the kind of games that work "better" with a console. shooters being a prime example, and consequently those are the most popular games. Call of Duty Black Ops anyone? best selling game ever?

Posted:3 years ago

#2

robert troughton
Managing Director

216 84 0.4
While I agree with a lot of what's said here, I'd disagree that console gaming is "dying"... Call of Duty, Gears of War, Halo and others have done brilliantly of late...

I would argue instead that AA-gaming on consoles (rather than AAA) has died.

The battlefield for games developers/publishers has changed, definitely, with the introduction of new pieces. Studios now need to be more adaptive than ever...

I know of studios in the UK that are investing significant funds in games that, when you ask them to describe them, they're saying things like "It's GTA - but with bikers", "It's Halo - but as an MMO", "It's Gran Turismo - but more arcade". Those will all be AA-games. And they will all end in disaster. Console gaming hasn't changed - consumers have. Consumers aren't stupid enough (any more) to pay £30 for a cheap rip-off of an existing game.

Posted:3 years ago

#3

gi biz
;,pgc.eu

341 51 0.1
Oh come on now, Angry Birds is funny for 20 minutes in the underground on your way back home, but that's all! That's the definition of a "casual game" now, isn't it? Angry birds is funny, but let's not mix mc donald's and haute cuisine!

Posted:3 years ago

#4

Terence Gage
Freelance writer

1,288 120 0.1
When mobile game developers can produce a game as lengthy, beautiful, immersive and deep as BioShock or Demon's Souls, I'll start to accept that he has something. Until then, I think they cater for very different markets and generally give the user vastly different experiences.

Of course, there's also the fact that Black Ops has just become the biggest-selling game ever in the most important gaming territory and Kinect is the fastest selling piece of entertainment tech ever. And - strangely contrary to this comment - Rovio themselves have not long released Angry Birds on PS3.

Posted:3 years ago

#5

Andrew Goodchild
Studying development

1,199 317 0.3
I wonder whether he will be making his weekly comments about the death of consoles once he has released his 27th angry birds game in 3 years and people stop buying them.
If they are so nimble, why are they following the strategy Activision used on Guitar Hero, of flogging a brand to death in as short a time as possible? Where is Rovio's first post Angry Birds IP?

Posted:3 years ago

#6

Nicholas Kurt Hughes
Studying transport design

3 0 0.0
I agree, consumers are moving towards online rental services which offer great value for money, compared to retailers, only buying into the AAA games as they offer the better quality and online support.

How he can state console gaming is dying is beyond me, I am not an avid supporter of the wii but there's an example for casual console gaming. For me games on mobile just don't work for longevity, take the iPhone for example gaming on it is a novelty at first but with the clunky touch screen controls and your finger constantly being in your view, its not fun.

This make me laugh:
"100 million downloads for Angry Birds, the majority of which are for the free version of the game"

Try doing a free version of the next Call of Duty

Posted:3 years ago

#7
Angry birds is excellent game play with enough variety to keep one busy anywhere, and that's the trump card of mobile platforms, being able to play anywhere. Angry birds is good though, keeps young and old engaged, allows for quick play and quick wins, console games especially epic games require time (lots) to enjoy

Posted:3 years ago

#8
Angry birds is excellent game play with enough variety to keep one busy anywhere, and that's the trump card of mobile platforms, being able to play anywhere. Angry birds is good though, keeps young and old engaged, allows for quick play and quick wins, console games especially epic games require time (lots) to enjoy

Posted:3 years ago

#9

Andrew Goodchild
Studying development

1,199 317 0.3
I would say possibly that if mobile gaming was really destroying the console gaming market, then his comments actually would be unnecissary, it would be happening whether or not he commented on it, so if he truely believes it, maybe he should just hold his tongue, let it happen, and celebrate if he's right.

The only benifit I can think of him proclaiming the death of console gaming, is invester perception, trying to make Rovio look like a better investment opportunity than a traditional dev.

Posted:3 years ago

#10

Private
Industry

1,187 185 0.2
Always the same people who preach about the end of consoles, those who are mainly doing mobile and facebbok games. There are still inovations on consoles LBP or the last guardian as example just to name two and innovative mobile games will be has to be seen. It's not like angry birds was something completely new and didn'r got the ideas from orher games.

Posted:3 years ago

#11
I think that, for the majority of the lifespans so far of the major consoles, there have simply been too many games, and not enough quality. I'd agree with Bob above that maybe the AA title is dying - but to say that consoles are on their deathbed would be as wrong as to say gaming on a tablet would never take off.

Posted:3 years ago

#12

Nick Burcombe
CEO & Co Founder

52 13 0.3
@Shiraj "epic games require time (lots) to enjoy" - and there-in lies the problem. For the much broader non-core-gamer audience, time is the most precious commodity and so for those people, AAA console gaming, is not desirable. Snappier, compact and equally addictive games are clearly going to be more appealing to a larger audience. I don't think the console market is going anywhere immediately, but the mid-long term prospects will mean that if they want to remain 'relevant' and expand the market going forward, the big three need to change tack. They have for the most part been selling to the same audience for far too long. Nintendo was bravest to strike out with the Wii, and it paid off, but possibly not in the long term. The cost of those epic games is too high and the number of profit-making games in the console business is too low, so something has to give. The article last week covering Angry Birds £140k investment on a £70m return must make the platform holders think again about the development methodology. We've been chasing this Movie Studio paradigm for years with ever increasing budgets, but in some respects - we've missed the point. Making games - is now, with the mobile platforms, actually more more akin to making music. And in many ways more like the old days...the pre-mega studio days. Anyone with a good idea and a bit of talent and time can make something good and engaging, but again much like the music industry, without marketing power, you'll probably struggle for major commercial success.

Posted:3 years ago

#13

Tom Keresztes
Programmer

632 223 0.4
AAA games are the dying breed, not consoles. As being nimble, constant updating, slow startup, hours of install time is something that has to be addressed. A more streamlined workflow in using games is what i mean

Posted:3 years ago

#14

Thomas Sigrist

12 0 0.0
Casual and Social games ... what is that? Simple game mechanics with a good amount of depth and games with a good, functional multiplayer? There was a time when all of that was combined in an AAA title. Shooters with the idTech3 engine come to mind.

Posted:3 years ago

#15

Alex Dawson
Technical Art director

16 0 0.0
This comment is right up there with the classic "the pc market is dying"

An insight into the mind of someone who doesn't appear to know what he's talking about with no facts to back it up.

Console, PC and Mobile/Portable can exist together and have been for many years despite the "fear of dying" comments which people like this love to spout.

Is he forgetting that in essence the mobile market is portable gaming and I remember a time when gameboys were known as portable/handheld games consoles.

Just because every chavette and her dog have an iPhone and it's popular doesn't mean everything else is dying. Sensationalised piffle!

Posted:3 years ago

#16

Terence Gage
Freelance writer

1,288 120 0.1
PC gaming is dying - even though according to the PGA it had its best year ever in 2010.

Handheld gaming is dying - even though the DS is likely to become the biggest selling games console ever later this year and the 3DS has already had a sell-out launch.

And now console gaming is dying too - even though the consoles are selling at a faster rate than the previous generation and it's the first time ever (?) all home consoles on the market have exceeded 50 million sales.

Posted:3 years ago

#17

Farhang Namdar
Lead Game Designer

76 47 0.6
I think this he's an angry bird

Posted:3 years ago

#18

Andrew Goodchild
Studying development

1,199 317 0.3
@Terence, and don't forget that according to a news story the other day, Kinect is apparently the fastest selling consumer electronics device ever.

Posted:3 years ago

#19

Patrick Vince
Studying MA Games Development

2 0 0.0
Hmm I can see what he means.., I mean Black Ops only made just over $1 Billion worldwide in 6 weeks...

Angry Birds is dead.... to me.

Posted:3 years ago

#20
Not sure what these elf styled gurus are up to.

I think there is a nice market for PC, Console, mobile game platforms, and they will eventually find their own level.
Everything is cyclical, and eventually even casual and social games will reach its zenieth death on day ::)

Posted:3 years ago

#21

Joe Bognar
PR Account Executive / Journalist

99 2 0.0
I think it's ok to praise your own creation up to a point. Peter V. just grabbed that point and catapulted it with his Angry Bird machine. The only problem that he did it in the wrong way. Of course you can say that Angry Birds is ace but don't say not-so-clever things just to get yourself heard. Console gaming is not dying! Full stop. You can give me Assassin's Creed, CoD, Splinter Cell... etc on any of the mobile phones (or I might even dare to say that any of the handheld platforms) but it will NEVER be as enjoyable as on a console!

Don't get me wrong. I really like Angry Birds (even though it's not out on WP7 yet -.-) but this statement is just ridiculous. Also, I don't think that anyone would say that he is un-biased... Because he's not! :)

P.s.: I agree with @David Amirian. If console gaming is dying. Why bring AB on the consoles? lolz

Posted:3 years ago

#22

Kingman Cheng
Illustrator and Animator

929 150 0.2
Yes because Angry Birds and similar titles will last forever...

Posted:3 years ago

#23
Angry Birds is as casual as you can get - its basically a "aim and release" game ... with nothing else. It works, because this SUITS mobiles really well - but would flop if it had to directly compare with other handheld/console games.

Posted:3 years ago

#24

Jim Webb
Executive Editor/Community Director

2,210 2,051 0.9
Mr. Vesterbacka, all 3 home consoles showed a year on year and month on month increase according to NPD in US for February.

Your definition of dying and my definition of dying aren't jiving.

Posted:3 years ago

#25

Daniel Vardy
Studying HND IT

90 1 0.0
Each platform has its own unique games. Mobile games are very much ones which you can pick up for 10 mins while on the bus. I have to disagree with David Amirian saying that FPS games are better on the console, its very subjective, but in my opinion the PC dominates that market due to the better quality of gameplay to be had.

The current gen consoles are dying, due to the fact they are getting old. The age of the consoles is severely holding back the gaming industry due to the hardware in them. Games are getting cut back in some way, usually visually due to MS and Sony asking for games to reach a minimum frames per second requirement.

Posted:3 years ago

#26

Glen Elliott
Partner/Head of Sales

57 2 0.0
$42 Million from a venture capital firm.....guessing they will have to look at the "full game pricing" themselves.

Posted:3 years ago

#27

Erlend Grefsrud
Creative Director

22 0 0.0
Most of you are reacting when you should be pondering. Ignore the $42 million investment, where were all of you when Real Time Worlds took their fateful investment? Oh, it was probably fine then -- it was a respected company making core games for y'all!

Yes, the console industry is clearly dying. Why isn't games the number one entertainment option out there? Why doesn't gaming sit alongside other media as well-established, tradition-rich and respected? An important part of the answer is the business model made necessary by the console market (where content providers, platform holders and consumers all have different vested interests in the cycle) and its cycles, which -- whether people like to admit it or not -- tore down the whole industry and re-established every five years.

This has led games to become a technologically and commercially volatile landscape where long-term investment is simply impossible because you never know what's there after the dust of a console transition period has settled.

Consoles are going away indeed. Out of the actors in the market, only Nintendo has got what they wanted whereas MS is probably wondering why they went there in the first place, while Sony has to figure out how to survive now that its most volatile division is a primary driver for the entire corporation.

Consoles as they exist today are not a viable business. There's no standardization, there's several smaller and fragmented markets and covering all of it requires the sort of investment that you need security in order to make. That's the one thing the console biz cannot offer, so the multinationals wanting in on the game are instead looking for a low barrier of entry.

That means mobile games, social games; some space where consumer expectations aren't quite as set as in the console and high-end PC markets, where they can develop expertise while they shape the market rather than playing catch-up to all the established companies that have made the volatile games market their particular finesse.

As the stragglers deleverage and web & devices become the new red ocean of games, you'll notice that games themselves aren't going to change dramatically. Elf fanciers will still get their 60 hour epics, while gorehounds can curbstomp aliens till they turn blue in the face. They just won't be playing them on Sony or Microsoft branded hardware hooked to their televisions anymore.

Is that so horrible to think about?

Posted:3 years ago

#28

Cobey Jones
Studying Game development

20 0 0.0
I don't think that console games and mobile games are in direct competition. These are drastically different products and have vastly different demographics. AAA games have nothing to worry about from these "disposable" games.

Posted:3 years ago

#29

Graham Simpson
Tea boy

220 7 0.0
"Console gaming is "dying" says Angry Birds boss"...

Says the man whose one success is a blatant ripoff of another game. Still it's hilarious to think they convinced the Venture Capital consortium to buy into them. Trebles all round...

Posted:3 years ago

#30

Alex Dawson
Technical Art director

16 0 0.0
@ Erlund Grefsrud: I still have yet to see why consoles are dying, I see that you raise issues with business models, commercial viability and other problems for console development but I fail to see why they are reportedly dying, why someone such as myself is going to cease playing games like Dead Space on my large TV, surround sound on full with a pad in hand?

The wording behind dying suggests that the market and need for consoles will dry up entirely and cease to exist, I doubt in many cases for gamers like me that the answer to console replacement is mobile or web gaming, it does not provide me with the kind of user experience I am after.

Mobiles are great for when I'm sitting on the loo in work or travelling on a train but when I get back home it's Super Meat Boy or Battlefield on the telly, that's who I am, that's who a lot of others are, we are a market and as long as we exist there is a market for consoles from what I can tell regardless of the pitfalls or lack of innovation that people suggest is happening.

Mobile gaming and web gaming is great, it has it's place, innovation is a fantastic thing, but I don't think dying is the correct choice of wording for what you or the angry birds bloke are implying.

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Alex Dawson on 14th March 2011 4:41pm

Posted:3 years ago

#31
It's been a rough day, I needed a laugh. I cannot express how much it cheers me up to hear the head of the company whose sole success was a clone of someone else's Flash game tell me how his sector is the heart of "innovation."

Posted:3 years ago

#32

Erlend Grefsrud
Creative Director

22 0 0.0
Ok, replace "dying" with "increasingly irrelevant" if that makes you more comfortable. And yes, if publishers stop supporting consoles with high-budget AAA games because it is not financially viable, then you will stop sitting in your couch playing games like that.

They're not going to become financially unviable just yet, but the writing has been on the wall for a while. The x360 and PS3 haven't and will not reach audiences of the scale MS and Sony intended. That means they're not earning the sort of licensing revenues they were expecting, and uptake of their technologies (digital distribution services, Blu-Ray, etc) is lower than projected.

That means their business case failed. Despite the games industry media having tried to make Nintendo out as the loser this generation in a bizarre double-twist of standards (reporting "increased Microsoft earnings" despite Microsoft breaking even on investment in approximately 50 years at current pace, while Nintendo is only reported on if their stock falls or Iwata warns investors that the Wii joyride won't last forever), it's pretty clear that the console market is unhealthy. You need to sell several million units to break even on development and marketing alone, and smaller, non-download titles simply drown.

How many dark horse cult classics have gone on to sell heaps this generation? Name one, apart from Demon's Soul. Perhaps Crackdown, although that was a first-party title and as such not really relevant, or Dead Rising. It's not a huge, impressive list. That alone should tell you something about the current economics of console development.

That said, that's where the audience is right now. 200 million people have home consoles, and they will probably want to keep using them seeing as they paid quite a lot for them, but eventually the games will dry up and people will go elsewhere. Unless there's another home console generation coming up, but that would be madness.

You say "Super Meat Boy" or "Battlefield", both of which are available as browser games. Not the full games, granted, but you probably see where I'm going. Think a bit broader -- technological paradigms change all the time. 40 years ago, a home console was unheard of. It did not exist. 30 years ago, it was a fad that crashed. 25 years ago, everyone were playing on microcomputers and 15 years ago Sony launched the first CD-ROM game console. To think that there might not be a home console market like the one we're currently used to in 5 to 10 years isn't some wild leap of imagination, it's pretty likely.

All our media consumption patterns are changing. I believe that the convergence box dream will finally fizzle, and any device with a browser becomes the convergence box. Everything will be served online across multiple platforms, be they mobile phones, televisions or tablets. The laptop, workstation and console may still exist, but as media and entertainment devices, they will most likely have been superseded by smaller, cheaper and more standardized platforms.

Posted:3 years ago

#33

Mario Tommadich
Technical Requirements & Compliance

32 28 0.9
Comparing full price, high quality, high content videogames to low budget, low quality, low content mobile games is like comparing Hollywood blockbusters to pay-per-view-5-minute video clips.

I think, unless mobile phones come with a build-in 42" screen, mobile games will stay what they are - small time wasters that you play on the bus.

Posted:3 years ago

#34

Christopher Bowen
Owner, Gaming Bus

118 0 0.0
So yet another self-interested twit is saying that the platform that he doesn't publish for is dying? Cool. Wake me when someone says something relevant.

Posted:3 years ago

#35

Christopher Bowen
Owner, Gaming Bus

118 0 0.0
They're not going to become financially unviable just yet, but the writing has been on the wall for a while. The x360 and PS3 haven't and will not reach audiences of the scale MS and Sony intended. That means they're not earning the sort of licensing revenues they were expecting, and uptake of their technologies (digital distribution services, Blu-Ray, etc) is lower than projected.

The hell? Isn't one of those links in my sidebar up above saying "Xbox 360 to outsell Wii in the US"? The same Wii that was successful enough to make it a casual gaming fad? And the PS3 is still selling strong five years after release? What did they want, a console in every garage house?

Oh, wait, what does Strongman games do? Browser games! Ah... yet another self-interested party decrying a club that you're not in.

Posted:3 years ago

#36

Dave Chan
Product Manager

6 0 0.0
This is like Notch being an expert on piracy.

Posted:3 years ago

#37

Robert Douglas
Studying B.A in Game Art and Design

18 4 0.2
It's always interesting to see the bias from both sides of the industry. Of course those that belong to the web-based/mobile market think they are the next best thing; they are speaking of their livelihood after all. As well as those who solely develop for the consoles/PC see their sector as living forever. The truth is that the gaming market is changing/evolving, but no analyst nor biased game-maker can truly foretell where it's going. I welcome the innovation and competition these new venues bring, means better (hopefully) gaming experiences all around.

That being said, to declare one market as dying (considering that its hardware is due for a replacement in the next few years, which will reinvigorate it), and to declare oneself as the winner when you are a nascent and developing market is a bit shortsighted in my opinion. Both sides can throw business successes and numbers/models until they are blue in the face, but we have yet to determine the gaming landscape ten years from now. I believe a great changes are in store and I eagerly await what's yet to come.

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Robert Douglas on 14th March 2011 5:54pm

Posted:3 years ago

#38

Bruce Cooner
Gameplay Lead

1 0 0.0
He's using hyperbole to grab attention, primarily of investors, here. It may be that he personally doesn't play console games and has extrapolated that to everyone.

The game I enjoyed most last year was Red Dead Redemption. Where's the phone (or tablet) that can offer me an experience like that?

Posted:3 years ago

#39
Uncharted 2 had me going back for more.

No tablet is going to provide as good a experience.

Posted:3 years ago

#40
I can only think that something similar happened when full blown movies and television sitcoms tried to say such things about each other as it seems to be a very similar case. Of course movies are very high budget and potentially unprofitable and television shows can be developed at a lower budget and create better results but businesses, especially in the creative industry are supported by market interest. As long as there is a market interest and people still will give up the weight in their wallets for that interest, some will always have their hand out to take the money, regardless of profitability (even though it's not a logical decision).

The car wasn't the best option to take about 100 years ago but the market exploded for that because market interest increased. Even if it doesn't explode or have great success, people still buy paintings, horses, cocaine, justin bieber albums anything! Youtube didn't get successful taking things logically and neither should the games industry.

Posted:3 years ago

#41

Erlend Grefsrud
Creative Director

22 0 0.0
@Christopher Bowen

The hell? Isn't one of those links in my sidebar up above saying "Xbox 360 to outsell Wii in the US"? The same Wii that was successful enough to make it a casual gaming fad? And the PS3 is still selling strong five years after release? What did they want, a console in every garage house?

Each of them were looking for PS2-size audiences, as in 100 million+. The sort that only Nintendo is currently enjoying, and they're 10 million sales short. x360 catching up to Wii sales in the US is hardly an indication that the console biz is picking up, no more than the Wii selling stronger throughout its lifespan than even the PS2 is. The total market is still small and fragmented.

Thanks for pointing out that my company does browser games and that this disqualifies me from having an opinion. Where's yours, by the way? All I can see is refusal to consider a perspective different from your own. I also think calling "casual gaming" a "fad" suggests that you need to update yourself on the realities of the current games market.

Posted:3 years ago

#42

Private
Industry

1,187 185 0.2
@Erlend: What writing on the wall? The continues growth of 360 and PS3 year over year, the record shattering CoD sales every year or just in general the high sales for AAA games? I would say you are going to see less AAA titles per year, but the big once are making enough money. What do you think how L.A. Noir is going to sell? On top of that I might remind you that besides of the 3rd Party games where obviously a publisher can decide to bring the game out wherever he wants there is a massive amount of 1st Party studios that can turn the tide in regards to if consumers buy a console or not. Consoles are only financially not viable if it does not sell and the core audience that you are not going to convince that mobile gaming would be better is big enough to make it viable. Let`s take as example MGS4 a pure core game mainly for only fans of the series released at a time with a low console installed based sold over 5 million units and I`m sure they made a nice profit on that game. Anything that Rockstar is doing sells like crazy, same goes for Halo games and CoD games. When good TV`s came out people where saying cinemas are going to die. Many many years later and they are still here.

I bet both of my lungs that after this generation you will see another console generation. Cloud gaming nice and good, but let me put it that way I got a fast 30mbit connection and have problems with OnLive retaining a good quality and dropping frequently to low quality and lagging. I`m sure that`s a better connection than what most average gamers have. It`s still going to take a longer time before the infrastructure is good enough to support such things in an affordable way especially in the US. Currently the countries that would come close enough in internet infrastructure are Japan and South Korea with way better internet.

Regarding dark horse, well ehm did you have a look at the top 50 selling PS2 games how many games there where surprise hits? Just to spare you the time 0. And to answer your question I will just name a couple as Borderlands, Little Big Planet, Batman Arkham Asylum, inFamours, Uncharted 1, Heavy Rain, LEGO games, Fallout 3, BioShock. I could go on but that should be enough. And just to add something to that, what do you think will be happening with those mobile phone developers who had one hit where they had no pressure and expectations at all who now have to do more games where people and if they take funding investors expect results from them?

Just to get back about innovation and console dying comments from facebook and mobile phone game developers. I just want to add there that most of them by far are the least innovative once and just ripping of other games *looks at Zynga* and we will see how it works out for those guys in 3-5 years and see if they are still doing so great as they do now. Not saying Rivio is doing that, but seriously how many games are out there on those platforms that are just reskins?

On a side note the PS1 wasn`t the first console using CD. 3DO, Amiga and Sega released already before the PS1 consoles that use CD or CD add on`s. I always get picky with those things. :)

Posted:3 years ago

#43

Chris Tux
Consultant

17 0 0.0
"Casual gaming" (browser type games) needs to be looked at as an entirely new and emerging market.

While I strongly disagree that consoles are "dead", there is no denying that browser games (tablet, cell, portable) have the potential to reach an entirely NEW audience...people who would never consider themselves "gamers". Heck, my mother, who has never played a video game besides Bejeweled, plays Angry Birds on her phone.

The advances in portable devices should scare Nintendo and Sony more than Microsoft. The 360 (imo) is positioned well for the next 3-5 years. The PSP and DS are who will feel the brunt of this new breed of "casual" games.

Posted:3 years ago

#44
In essence, its just a developer trying to drum up interest by saying something semi controversial, but the basis of discussion is misguided at best.

Posted:3 years ago

#45

Keldon Alleyne
Handheld Developer

423 361 0.9
One word: PLC

As Satoru Iwata warned, iOS and the new pricing models may be driving the games industry into the last stages of the PLC.

They could coexist with some differentiation, like what Sony is doing with premium Android titles. It all depends on two things: (1) whether the previous generation of gamers continue to support the well established 'premium' game model, and (2) whether the next generation of gamers also adopt and embrace the 'premium' gaming model.

Time will tell.

Posted:3 years ago

#46

Haven Tso
Web-based Game Reviewer

255 8 0.0
It's just funny that these comments come up from time to time is. So far I'm thinking what are they offering beyond Angry Birds? If they have like 10 games as successful as Angry Birds under their belt, well maybe there is more creditbility. Console and mobile gaming are for different markets and audience. I certainly don't use my portable devices the same way as my consoles in terms of gaming. Maybe he is too busily making another expansion pack for Angry Birds so all he could do is game on the train?

At the current state, unless mobile phones battery can last for up to 10 hours or above with all the functions been carried out at the same time (not standby time, actual game time) then maybe, but not with the current level of technology I suppose.

The landscape may change but saying that console gaming is dying is beyond comprehension at this stage. It feels more like a small starlet at 16 stripping off for adult magazines claiming she has grown up as a woman.

Posted:3 years ago

#47

Tom Keresztes
Programmer

632 223 0.4
Birdie Ring of Death.

Posted:3 years ago

#48

Greg Wilcox
Creator, Destroy All Fanboys!

1,993 902 0.5
Whatever. It's STILL "Jenga with a Slinghot (TM)"

@Werner - you meant PS3 games - Hell, I'd have LOVE to see Heavy Rain, Borderlands, LBP and those others on the PS2 (could you imagine that?).

Anyway, off to worry about what's happening in the rest of the world...

Posted:3 years ago

#49

Frankie Kang
Producer / Consultant

39 1 0.0
PAX East, a US video game convention, announced 60,000 attendees this weekend. Console gaming is dying indeed.

Posted:3 years ago

#50

Private
Industry

1,187 185 0.2
No no Greg, I should have maybe made a new paragraph to count some of sleeper hits on the current gen, but I did actually mean that if you look at the 50 best selling (well as accurate as you can take VGchartz) PS2 games none of those are surprise hits you get Sports games, GTA`s and GT`s. Well I actually stand corrected there are two God of War 1 and Kingdom Hearts 1, but the rest all known franchises. Already on previous systems some of the best games didn`t sell good like Ico or Shadow of the Collosus and that`s nothing new it`s the same with movies some amazing movies are just unknown by many people and you can`t say that`s only consoles and that`s why consoles are going down. If anybody could predict how console gaming will turn out the companies would either throw all of their money into it or nothing at all and abandon it. They make consoles for a long time (except MS) and they can`t really predict how things will be in 10 years after the next generation of consoles so how are people who made one download console game so far know when and if consoles are going to die?

And I have the news channel while reading here.

Posted:3 years ago

#51

Greg Wilcox
Creator, Destroy All Fanboys!

1,993 902 0.5
@Werner - Ah, got you - sorry about that.

As for some other stuff: One thing I'm seeing and am TIRED of hearing is that this generation of consoles is "old", "dead" or something else annoying some analyst barfs out on occasion just to get someone's stock prices jumping around. That's total BS and the only "good" thing about the lousy economy in my book. Developers (who might not all like that "old" tech - anyone have an opinion?) have to squeeze out every ounce of power from the PS3, 360 and Wii and we're seeing some truly great games hit now instead of seeing a new system rushed out this year that ends up with crappy launch games that go backward instead of forward in terms of gameplay.

Granted, you can't go much further in graphics at this point - it's animation and whether or not a team is willing to take huge risks in visual styles that aren't just more hyper-realistic "gritty" environments and perfect-looking character models. There's room at the inn for more games that get people excited because they look like art in motion rather than yet another cut 'n paste shooter or action game with tilted camera angles on occasion.

Of course, NGP, Xperia PLAY and 3DS aren't included in that thought, but I'm taking a wait and see approach to those in terms of what sort of games are hitting stores. I think there's a big difference between casual and console games in terms of many things, but not the fact that they're all GAMES at the end of the day. All platforms can get along if (as I keep saying) everyone sticks to doing what they do best. Eyes on the prize and all that.

Of course, the whole motion control and "3D" trends are adding a bit more life to some titles, but the fact that none of this is being forced on consumers (i.e., you don't NEED a Move or Kinect unless you want to play games made for the peripherals) is welcome. Of course, I could be wrong (again), but I'm not worried as long as the games are fun.

Posted:3 years ago

#52

Chris Schollenberger
Studying Bachelor of Computer Games

1 0 0.0
It appears to me that this gentleman fails to understand that console gaming is a niche market, clearly different from casual. Why we have suddenly fallen into a casual v. console war completely eludes me. It's like comparing exploitation films to hollywood films, one was made on a low budget and people will watch it because you can watch it cheap and exploits at least one lurid element which is basically self-marketing, whereas a hollywood film has had time and money put into it and is arguably a much richer experience for the viewer, and there are plenty of people who take preference into that experience. The same ideals fit into casual and console gaming, people will spend money according to the experience they want to have.

Posted:3 years ago

#53

Private
Industry

1,187 185 0.2
I do have an opinion but not a developer :D

At least on the PS3 there is still a lot of space if you look at first party and third party. Not to say the third party games look bad far from it they look good on both consoles, but there is still room with optimizing the engines and using the SPU`s to it`s fullest extend. Looking at what GG did with Killzone 3 to actually upgrade it`s visuals compared to Killzone 2 and the gameplay videos from Uncharted 3 look also promising that Naughty Dog still found some more power to improve the engine further. The PS2 had most of it`s best games very late in the cycle like GoW 2, Persona 4 (released after the PS3 came out), MGS3, KH2 or FF12 (I have to throw those in :D ).

I imagine a longer life cycle is better for developers to get out more of the investment they made by creating new engines and so on especially with the transition from SD to HD. They probably want to get more money out of it before they start again from scratch. But the transition from that gen to the next one should be a lot smoother hopefully as the upgrade should be less huge. Even if the next gen looks like the Epic video it`s still HD textures and so on just with better effects the texture quality doesn`t triple.

Like I said just my opinion don`t know what developers think about that mater.

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Private on 14th March 2011 10:48pm

Posted:3 years ago

#54

Darren Adams
Managing Director

188 332 1.8
Lol, I make mobile games for a living, but console gaming dying?? BOLLOCKS!! Then again what he says is exactly the type of thing you would expect anyone to say in his position and situation, he has to justify the recent large investment.

Casual games work on mobile and browser platforms and core games work on consoles/PC's, that's not rocket science by any means. Just the same as road cars drive well on roads and 4x4's drive well off road, each the same but different. Mobile and Consoles will co-exist and neither will diminish the other's market as they are two entirely different markets. Of course there will be overlaps where core gamers play casual games and casual gamers play core games, but this isnít going to be detrimental to either market.

Yes Peter, be happy that Angry Birds has made a shit load of money and tell the world, but leave the future gazing for the likes of Mystic Meg. ;)

Edited 2 times. Last edit by Darren Adams on 14th March 2011 11:18pm

Posted:3 years ago

#55

Jeffrey Kesselman
CTO

112 0 0.0
This falls into the seer sucker principle.

At any time there are at least a dozen people claiming to be seers into the future and a few thousand suckers to believe them.

What I do personally agree with is that the traditional games categories have strangled themselves on bloated budgest and the drive to "bigger and better" their competition. As production busgets increase, risk taking decreases, thats inevitable. That "casual game" market is somewhat of a reboot on that score, though if he doesn't think its already starting there he is a fool with no concept of history or ability to apply it.

Posted:3 years ago

#56

Tony Johns

520 12 0.0
I personally think that we can all be acting like experts in our field, but when talking about another field that we are not involved with can cause a little bit of innaccurate information.

From the way I see it, the consoles have never been stronger.

This is the first generation where no hardware company has struggled or totally dominated, both Microsoft and Sony are doing well while Nintendo themselves have had a successful run this generation because of them trying to do something different.

Even Apple seems to be doing well for themselves in the iPhone and iPad games area.

So I would never say that console gaming is dying at all, more likely that the closure of some studios around the world has always been happening since the start of the industry in the 70's and has been part of the normal competitive market where if you sell well, then you will survive but if you can't sell well and the proffits don't come in then you will die out.


Posted:3 years ago

#57

Tony Johns

520 12 0.0
Although I do agree with one thing.

Downloadable content is a pain for the users who don't have real internet connection like I know I used to have no internet at home, as well as a few people in my external family don't have internet at all, thus making it impossible for them to feel like they have brought a complete game when in reality allot of the content needs to be downloaded online.

And also don't get me started on the PC games that require me to be online in order to start playing the game.

Posted:3 years ago

#58

Adam Campbell
Studying Games Technology

101 0 0.0
I hate it when people disregard the rise and inevitable dominance of smart-phone gaming, yet I think it's nonsense when people spell the end of consoles and PC.

Posted:3 years ago

#59

Gregory Hommel
writer

92 53 0.6
What was the last game that truly changed the way we play games? Heavy Rain? What was the last game that changed the visuals and polish we expect from our games? Killzone 3? What was the last game that changed what we can get out of a game, visuals, story, character, polish, multi-player, etc.? Uncharted 2? I'd say there is plenty of innovation going on in the home console space. At least there is on the console in my home. As I dare to leave out Little Big Planet 2.

Posted:3 years ago

#60

Hurple
CEO

9 0 0.0
This year's new 'rent-a-gob' from Finland and sudden global economy expert on the games biz. Had one hit out of 52 - and we are waiting for the follow up.............

Posted:3 years ago

#61

Stuart Green
Studying BTEC Games Development

7 0 0.0
I wouldn't say that AAA gaming is dead or even dying but there are obvious problems with the busines models and budgets involved in some of these games which means some companies are struggling unless they have a really sucessful IP such as CoD, Halo, Mario etc etc. You only have to look at the depressing news of Bizzare Creations demise for evidence of that.

But these companies are catering to a different market, the hardcore gamers.

Although mobile gaming is on the rise and gaining new customers who aren't normally gamers or casual gamers, which is good for the industry and for independent developers, suggesting that the end of console gaming is nigh, is quite odd and it won't die for sometime yet because mobile gaming can never offer the same type of experience that the home consoles can.

I've been an hardcore gamer since since the early 80's and while there is a manufaturer and development company building something for me to get my kicks on in the comfort of my own home, there will always be a market.

Posted:3 years ago

#62

Julian Cram
Project Manager

49 27 0.6
Will Angry Birds be remembered as fondly as Mario Cart, God of War, or Halo?

Or will, like the best app of the year before last, will we not remember Angry Birds in a years time?

Posted:3 years ago

#63

Erlend Grefsrud
Creative Director

22 0 0.0
<strong>This falls into the seer sucker principle.

At any time there are at least a dozen people claiming to be seers into the future and a few thousand suckers to believe them.</strong>

I think that pretty much sums this up. Now apply it everywhere.

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Erlend Grefsrud on 15th March 2011 10:37am

Posted:3 years ago

#64
I was thinking more along the lines of Crazy Frog jingle or webuyanycar...hehe

Posted:3 years ago

#65

Nick Burcombe
CEO & Co Founder

52 13 0.3
@Julian - I think angry bird WILL be remembered as fondly as those big console titles - I don't think there are any console titles have 100 million units out there. This on-going assumption that Angry Birds is in some way not a "real" game is absolutely ridiculous. It's brilliant and perfect blend of emergent gameplay which often throws up unexpected result. There is luck involved, but there is also skill and experimentation. Along with truly mass-market endearing graphics and audio appeal and god knows how many levels, I'd say this was definitely a "real" game. I think the worst thing about Angry Birds is the price. Its worth so much more than $1.

Edited 3 times. Last edit by Nick Burcombe on 15th March 2011 2:33pm

Posted:3 years ago

#66

Private
Industry

1,187 185 0.2
100 million units cant be compated if you give them away for free or 1buck. I have the free version and currently have no intentions on buying any mobile phone game.

VW is selling a lot mit Golf than Lotus Elise that alone does not say much if the Lotus business is viable or not.

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Private on 15th March 2011 2:45pm

Posted:3 years ago

#67

Jim Webb
Executive Editor/Community Director

2,210 2,051 0.9
Demand....I repeat this word...demand.

So long as demand exists, the market will exists. Demand doesn't give a rats posterior what other markets do.
Unmet demand dictates far more than over saturated supply.

And the console market still has enough demand to warrant existence.

Posted:3 years ago

#68

Login or register to post

Take part in the GamesIndustry community

Register now