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Activision, Intel, IBM add voices to oppose Google's proposed Xbox ban

More companies advise ITC on potential impact of patent enforcement

Activision, Intel and IBM have added their voices to the list of companies which are advising the US ITC to oppose Google's proposed ban on the import of Xbox 360 units to the country.

The industry giants have all asked the ITC committee to consider the impact which an import ban on the machine would have on their businesses, reports Foss Patents.

Activision were keen to support yesterday's letter from the ESA, pointing out that a ban would have a hugely negative impact on their operations, as the company "has expended and continues to expend significant resources to develop video games and accessories specially adapted to operate on Microsoft's Xbox gaming console".

IBM's case was more wide-ranging, pointing out that "Motorola's domestic industry relating to gaming devices is based largely on licensing, and Motorola does not manufacture a product that competes with the Xbox 360".

Intel proffered a five page objection to the case, citing the importance of establishing proper FRAND practice in an industry which increasingly revolves around the acquisition and fair leasing of patents.

As the case, which stems from a long running debate over patents held by the Google-owned Motorola, rests on whether a ban would be in the public interest, input from other companies which would be affected has been encouraged by the ITC. The decision over whether to enforce a ban now rests in the hands of the ITC committee.

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Latest comments (3)

Kessia Thomas Studying 3D Computer Animation, University of the West of Scotland4 years ago
Lets look at that statement, 'long running debate over patents held by the Google-owned Motorola' This isn't about patents, this is about Google sticking one to its long standing nemesis....
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Andrew Ihegbu Studying Bsc Commercial Music, University of Westminster4 years ago
I think it goes the other way to be honest. Google has basically nothing to financially lose from failing to win this, but MS have a hell of a lot to lose from NOT winning. Logically MS would have come to a settlement out of court like the other console case (I think that was PS3 if I'm remember correct).

MS should have really settled this out of court as soon as they saw the rulings going that way, the PR would be bad enough right? The fact that they didn't makes me think they were the ones with the grudge.
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Nicholas Pantazis Senior Editor, VGChartz Ltd4 years ago
@ Doug Google's patent wars with Microsoft were defensive. Apple fired the first shot, followed by Microsoft, and Google and Android manufacturers have been assaulted from all sides ever since (while Microsoft and Apple conveniently ignore one another, despite most of these patent claims being relevant against one another as well).

Google was seen as a weak target, because they were in fact a weak target. They went into Android expecting the industry to thrive off the competition and smart phone manufacturers to build off one-another, and because of that they did not secure the kinds of patents they'd need to be a threat to Microsoft and Apple before going in. Microsoft and Apple, meanwhile, don't see it the same way. They don't want competition.

What's happening now is Google has spent the last 3 years patenting up and firing back, trying to prove to those companies that they can drown them in lawsuits in turn if they don't back off and allow Google to operate fairly. It's a defensive war on Google's part, but the fact that such a war can exist at all just shows how horribly broken our patent system is.

As for the ban, obviously it would be bad for the industry. On the other hand forcing Microsoft to actually negotiate reasonable terms would be good for the future of technology and innovation.
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