Close
Are you sure? Are you sure you want to report this comment? I understand, report it. Cancel

Retail

Valve announces major overhaul for Steam

Mon 18 Jul 2011 10:20am GMT / 6:20am EDT / 3:20am PDT
RetailPublishing

New system will feature improvements to game updates and better download rates

Valve will overhaul its Steam distribution platform with new server and client code.

The aim is to streamline the publishing process and provide the service's worldwide users with better download rates.

"The maximum aggregate bandwidth of the system will be greater than the current system; this will help us satisfy spikes in demand when there's a big release," Valve said in a statement.

"We will also be able to send content from more places, to better serve people all around the globe. All the content on the new system is sent via HTTP; this is more firewall-friendly than the current system, and will automatically take advantage of web-caching proxies installed at ISPs."

The overhauled Steam will also require users to download less data for game updates. At present, when an individual file on disk is modified it is necessary to download the whole file again, but the new system will be able to deliver only the difference between the old and new versions.

In addition, the new system will be able to download game updates during play, and apply the changes when the user exits the game.

"These changes have given us an opportunity to write new tools for game developers and content publishers that simplify the process of both publishing and updating a game on Steam. Simplifying the publishing process means it takes the partner and us less time to ship each product, so we can ship more stuff to more users."

Valve is also adding a number of new features in response to requests from its clients. New releases will benefit from bandwidth throttling, download scheduling, and users will be able to prioritise which purchases begin downloading first.

Currently, the only content available through the new system is a high-definition trailer, but Valve will apply the system to more content over time, including the forthcoming Dota 2.

14 Comments

Kingman Cheng
Illustrator and Animator

949 166 0.2
"...and apply the changes when the user exists the game."

Exists? Incepted into the game?

you mean exits? ;)

Posted:3 years ago

#1

Garry Newman
Company Director

1 0 0.0
Hoping we can push out our own updates :)

Posted:3 years ago

#2

James Prendergast
Research Chemist

735 430 0.6
How about some changes to the way the friends and groups systems work too whilst you're at it, Valve?

:)

I presume the "download while you play" updates system won't work for online MP games since you'd need to be updated to the version of the MP server you're playing on anyway...

Edited 1 times. Last edit by James Prendergast on 18th July 2011 2:49pm

Posted:3 years ago

#3

Nick Gunn
3D Artist

12 0 0.0
Good news. Steam is a great platform that's really impressed me. I use it a lot.

Posted:3 years ago

#4
This is good news (I didn't know Steam downloaded the entire game again for each update though, I could have sworn most of the updates I've got a much smaller than the game).

I hope they put some sort of download scheduler on it so I can have it download overnight so it doesn't contribute to my monthly limit.

Posted:3 years ago

#5

Nick Swallow
Studying Technology and Innovation Management

2 0 0.0
James - I think the "download while you play" system works for textures, models etc rather than any underlying game mechanics. You can do the same thing for World of Warcraft now after just a 200mb download which I still find amazing!

Posted:3 years ago

#6

Anuj Malhotra
Studying Business Management

31 0 0.0


@ sebastian: 'At present, when an individual file on disk is modified it is necessary to download the whole file again, but the new system will be able to deliver only the difference between the old and new versions.'

"File" not the whole game, that would be a ridiculously long process.

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Anuj Malhotra on 18th July 2011 3:26pm

Posted:3 years ago

#7

Daniel Vardy
Studying HND IT

90 1 0.0
good news, been waiting for some of those features. it is quite evident that the content servers do eventually reach a saturation point when there is a large update and there would always have needed to be an overhaul to the way in which content in delivered to keep with demand. bandwidth throttling and being able to download during play are for me the most useful features, as it means i can download at a slow speed while playing without compromising my online experience.

Posted:3 years ago

#8

Andrew Ihegbu
Studying Bsc Commercial Music

440 146 0.3
@Garry Newman

Firstly you are awesome! Shout outs from Great Barr to Walsall. More importantly GMod Mac?

Posted:3 years ago

#9

James Prendergast
Research Chemist

735 430 0.6
@Nick, I don't see why it'd be limited to those. I mean, it's effectively downloading and then autopatching like the MS OSes do in the background.

Posted:3 years ago

#10

Hector Sanchez
Studying Electrical Engineering

1 0 0.0
Is this due to some strong arming from EA? Maybe there'll be a climactic return of Crysis 2 and "just in time" arrival of Battlefield 3.

Posted:3 years ago

#11

Andrew Goulding
Director

9 3 0.3
Steam has been the best platform for distribution of our pirate dog point and click adventure - Jolly Rover, better than casual and even adventure game enthusiast stores. I agree with Garry that being able to push out our own content to the servers would relieve a small bottleneck in publishing to Steam, but still, Valve are always surprising me with how quickly they can respond to update requests.

At the moment we're going exclusively with Steam for our next puzzle adventure title - MacGuffin's Curse. Look for it there there this Halloween =0).

Posted:3 years ago

#12

Shaun Farol
Studying Computer Information Systems

40 12 0.3
I can't help but feel that this might be in-part because the increase market pressures from Steam's still minority competition, most notably GameStop-Impulse. I think Steam having a couple rivals is healthy and good all around for the industry. Valve won't be allowed to stagnate if it wants to keep its lead.

I have used both digital distribution platforms and as software Steam is almost clunky in comparison. I mean I love their sales as much as the next guy but their handling of offline mode and their client itself could use some work.

Posted:3 years ago

#13

Rick Cody
PBnGames-Board Member

144 14 0.1
@ Shaun
You're right, this competition is good. The progress we'll see in the next few years on the digital store front should be astonishing

Posted:3 years ago

#14

Login or register to post

Take part in the GamesIndustry community

Register now