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Games targeted as part of campaign against anti-social behaviour

Violent videogames are being targeted as part of a new campaign launched by Take A Break magazine after more than 80 per cent of respondents to a reader survey said they should be banned.

Violent videogames are being targeted as part of a new campaign launched by Take A Break magazine after more than 80 per cent of respondents to a reader survey said they should be banned.

The campaign, which is titled Mums' Army, is aimed at putting a stop to anti-social behaviour on the streets of Britain. According to the Take A Break website, "Ordinary people are finding themselves on the frontline, their lives curtailed by feral youths who bully and fight, get drunk, sell drugs and rule by gangs... It's time for the ordinary women of Britain to show a united front."

Take A Break is inviting readers to sign a petition which will be delivered to the Prime Minister in support of the campaign, and is also seeking candidates who would be willing to stand for election.

Amongst a number of concerns suggested for consideration by Mums' Army supporters, the campaign website highlights the issue of violence in videogames: "Computer games glorify pimping, drug dealing and street murders. Can we control this?"

Take A Break recently conducted a reader survey and found that 82 per cent of the 7000 respondents said that videogames with violent content should be banned.

GamesIndustry.biz contacted Take A Break editor John Dale to enquire about the campaign - specifically the issue of whether it should be up to parents to take responsibility for which games their children play.

"I think that's a perfectly decent point, but it doesn't go very far," Dale said, arguing that although there are laws against selling 18-rated games to minors, children still get access to them.

"The law is also supposed to stop the sale of tobacco and alcohol to those under the legal age, but it still goes on."

The Mums' Army campaign is also raising the issue of youth violence, 24 hour drinking and police presence on the streets, amongst others. The survey found that 99 per cent of respondents believed there should be more police on the beat, and the same proportion said that there should be increased protection for those who report anti-social behaviour.

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Ellie Gibson

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Ellie spent nearly a decade working at Eurogamer, specialising in hard-hitting executive interviews and nob jokes. These days she does a comedy show and podcast. She pops back now and again to write the odd article and steal our biscuits.

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