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Molyneux "not surprised" by PlayStation Move

Microsoft Game Studios boss looks forwards to second wave of motion control games

Peter Molyneux, Lionhead Studios founder and creative director of Microsoft Game Studios Europe, has characterised the PlayStation Move as "more a device for the core than it is for the casual market".

In an interview with sister site Eurogamer, Molyneux was asked whether he had seen anything of the PlayStation Move at GDC. "Yes, I have seen some of it," he answered. "We're not really surprised, are we? I mean at E3 last year we saw they were having a wand, and that's kind of what I expected."

Although he characterised Move as "not as big a step as something like Natal", Molyneux did imply that Sony's controller may be more precise in its motion control.

Molyneux was far from dismissive of the new hardware though, stating instead that: "To be honest, it's all down to what us poor old designers do with this stuff, because all these guys do is make the hardware."

"I don't think the first wave of these motion control titles will be what you expect," he said. "Just as with every hardware chain, it's the second wave where they usually come up with stuff that's interesting. So the second wave could be really cool."

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Latest comments (12)

Kingman Cheng Illustrator and Animator 9 years ago
Well there's one thing I definately agree on there, what really happens next is down to the developers.
However as the controller will 'retail under $100' makes you wonder how expensive it's going to be.
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Antony Cain Lecturer in Computer Games Design, Sunderland College9 years ago
"I don't think the first wave of these motion control titles will what you expect," he said. "Just as with every hardware chain, it's the second wave where they usually come up with stuff that's interesting. So the second wave could be really cool."

You could read that in a few different ways. Is he saying he's not happy with their debut titles? Poor Milo!

Good luck to them to be honest, I'd like my Natal scepticism to be off the mark, even if it does mean waiting for this 'second wave'.

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Antony Cain on 12th March 2010 12:38pm

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Terence Gage Freelance writer 9 years ago
"I don't think the first wave of these motion controls will [*be*] what you expect"

Typo there in the final paragraph, GI.

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Anyway, although I don't have a lot of interest in either Move or Natal, I will be interested to see how each system compares - in particular, I wonder how Natal is going to manage more precise gameplay like that which you associate with an FPS or 3D platformer. I think Natal has wider potential than Move, but at the same time could be limited by the lack of a traditional control scheme in any capacity. It will obviously work with mini games or driving games, but it's going to require a lot of thinking outside the box for developers to develop compelling Natal gameplay in the more complicated and fast-paced genres.

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Terence Gage on 12th March 2010 12:49pm

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Show all comments (12)
Jonathan Murphy Lead Artist, Infusion Games9 years ago
Watching the Sony presentation of the Move, when we had Zipper demonstrating Socom 4, I couldn't help but notice how the player moved in his seat, as if trying to get a better view or avoid fire. It was then I was thinking, it wasn't the direct input that we were wanting to replicate/replace with motion control, it is the secondary motion. The ducks, the peering round corners that we do even though we know it has no effect on the game. If a motion control system, and I'm thinking Natal with it's motion recognition can do this, enhance the gaming experience, then I'll become very interested.
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Bryan Robertson9 years ago
I really wish Lionhead would make a Natal-compatible version of Black & White. I would definitely buy that, even if it were just a basic port for Arcade. Seems like Natal would be perfect for all the gestures, interaction with the world, etc. (Assuming that it's as powerful as the PR makes it out to be)
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Malachy O'Neill Lead Tester, Microsoft Studios9 years ago
I second a Natal version of Black & White.
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David Amor Director, MAG Interactive9 years ago
Antony, I doubt Milo is a launch window Natal game.
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Alasdair Gray Company Director 9 years ago
I third Xbox 360 Black & White - even without Natal!

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Alasdair Gray on 15th March 2010 6:39am

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Antony Cain Lecturer in Computer Games Design, Sunderland College9 years ago
You're probably right David
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Jim Webb Executive Editor/Community Director, E-mpire Ltd. Co.9 years ago
Jonathan, that sounds intriguing on the surface but we all duck, bob and weave very differently and many of us not at all. so a system like that would have be user customizable or else the volume of failed or unwanted ducks, bobs and weaves would become frustrating. And I can't imagine that kind of individual customization being an easy task for developers or the end user.
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Michael Tegos Editor, Official PlayStation Magazine Greece, Attica Media9 years ago
Personally, I wonder if this sudden interest in different motion control schemes won't further fragment the market. It's already hard enough for the end user to keep track of the different platform exclusives; this latest introduction of two completely new control systems in addition to the existing one (Wii) just moves further away from the integration the rest of the industry seems to be pointing towards. Of course, each of the three major platform holders want to remain competitive, and we've yet to see how popular this new trend will prove to be, but it's hard not to be a bit skeptical.
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Ahmad Salman9 years ago
I can't trust anything Microsoft makes anymore, I'm a 360 owner and I learned my lesson.. let other ppl experience it enough and let Microsoft fix it to death and then you go buy it (whatever it is, Natal .. etc)
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