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8th July 2021

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Fortnite made $9bn in two years

Epic Games' battle royale made $5.4bn in 2018 and $3.7bn in 2019, court documents from the Epic vs Apple trial showed

Epic Games' hit Fortnite made $9 billion in two years, court documents from the Epic vs Apple trial revealed.

A finance board presentation dating from January 2020 was shared during the first day of the trial yesterday. The document highlighted that Fornite made $5.4 billion in 2018 and $3.7 billion in 2019, bringing it to a total of $9.1 billion in two years.

At the time, the presentation predicted that Fortnite would make $2.7 billion in 2020 but, as The Verge reported, the title ended up making an impressive $5.1 billion.

The document also indicated the performance of other Epic games, with revenue from Psyonix titles, Battle Breakers and Spyjinx combined reaching $108 million across 2018 and 2019.

Revenue from Unreal Engine reached $124 million in 2018 and $97 million in 2019.

Finally, the Epic Games Store made $235 million across these two years, with most of this revenue achieved in 2019 as the store launched in December 2018. It was reported last month that Epic spent around $444 million in 2020 on making the storefront more lucrative to PC gamers.

Epic and Apple made their opening statements in the US District Court case yesterday, with the Fortnite developer questioning the motivations behind App Store policies, while the iPhone maker said Epic's victory would hurt consumers.

Celebrating employer excellence in the video games industry

8th July 2021

Submit your company

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