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Call of Duty has brought in $3 billion in past year

Activision's shooter franchise breaking records with mainline releases reinforced by Warzone and Call of Duty Mobile

Call of Duty is enjoying a banner year, as Activision today announced that with the release of Call of Duty: Black Ops Cold War, the franchise has now surpassed $3 billion in net bookings.

That total includes contributions from Black Ops Cold War, Call of Duty: Modern Warfare, Call of Duty Mobile, and Call of Duty Warzone, which launched in March.

Net bookings for 2020 are up 80% year-to-date, with units sold of the mainline Call of Duty games up 40% year-over-year.

Activision also said Call of Duty has seen more players than ever before with 200 million in 2020 alone. However, it's worth noting that 2019 and earlier did not include the free-to-play Warzone, a full year of contributions from the free-to-play Call of Duty Mobile, or a global pandemic that gave people reasons to stay inside and took away some competing entertainment options.

Even so, Call of Duty's $3 billion in bookings over the past 12 months is almost as much money as Activision has ever brought in for a full year in its history.

Activision didn't report bookings in 2009, but it did post the publisher's all-time high for revenues with $3.16 billion, a total that represented the contributions of Call of Duty Modern Warfare 2, as well as the Guitar Hero, Tony Hawk, Transformers, X-Men, Marvel Ultimate Alliance, and Spider-Man franchises, among others.

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