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Call of Duty brings in $500 million in three days

Black Ops 4 sees launch weekend revenue in line with last year's WWII, not quite up to Black Ops III's $550 million

No single player? No problem. Activision today announced that Call of Duty: Black Ops 4 brought in more than $500 million in worldwide sales over the course of its launch weekend.

That's the same figure the publisher revealed last year for Call of Duty: WWII, but still down from the series' high point this generation, Black Ops III, which brought in $550 million in its first three days. That said, it's still well above the generation's low point, Infinite Warfare, which brought in less than half of WWII's total.

That's not to say the game hasn't set some records. Black Ops 4's launch weekend set new high marks for most combined players, average hours per player, and total hours played on current generation consoles. People have also spent more time watching Black Ops 4 on Twitch through the game's launch weekend than any other Call of Duty game in a comparable time frame.

The game's commercial success can be added to its critical acclaim, as reviewers have been generally positive on Black Ops 4's multiplayer focus and new battle royale game mode, Blackout.

"Black Ops 4 is off to a blockbuster start," said Activision executive vice president and Call of Duty GM Rob Kostich. "Our player counts and hours played are up year over year, our viewership on Twitch has set new standards and is showing just how fun Blackout is to play and to watch, and the weekend results yet again put Call of Duty at that highest tier of entertainment. Our digital sales results have been record-breaking across all platforms, and the overall performance strong."

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