Sections

King hires BBC diversity director

Joyce Adeluwoye-Adams joins Candy Crush firm to continue its work promoting games industry inclusivity

Casual games giant King has taken another step in pushing for diversity with a key new hire to its management team.

The firm has named Joyce Adeluwoye-Adams as global director of diversity and inclusion. She joins from the BBC, where she worked as diversity lead for two and a half years, prior to which she held a similar position at the Producer's Alliance for Cinema and Television.

She joined the Candy Crush creator last week, shortly after receiving and MBE for her work expanding the talent pool of the media industry. In total, she has over 21 years of experience in her field, which King is keen to draw on.

The firm already runs various diversity and inclusion programs internally, such as Women@King. We interviewed culture manager Natalie Mellin last year about why these efforts are so important to the firm.

""It's no surprise that more diverse talent can result in an increase in productivity, innovation and even revenue," said Adeluwoye-Adams. "It's a real honour to join a company which has such a strong desire to improve diversity and inclusion across its workforce - and I'm excited to drive this agenda forward in my new position at King."

King's chief people officer Colin Daly added: "We're extremely pleased to welcome Joyce to the King team. She is a passionate and inspirational leader and will make a significant contribution to our company and culture and our ongoing work around global talent strategy, diversity and inclusion."

If you have jobs news to share or a new hire you want to shout about, please contact us on newhires@gamesindustry.biz

More stories

Candy Crush Soda Saga and Dragon Ball Z: Dokkan Battle hit $2b lifetime revenue

But Dragon Ball reached the milestone faster, according to Sensor Tower estimates

By Matthew Handrahan

British technology inquiry chair says industry is only "paying lip service" to gaming addiction

King Digital, UKIE, TIGA, others struggle to convince MPs that games industry is taking issues like loot boxes seriously

By Haydn Taylor

Latest comments

Sign in to contribute

Need an account? Register now.