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Mojang ends Scrolls support

"It can no longer sustain continuous development"

Mojang has announced it is ending support for its card battling title Scrolls despite "tens of thousands" of players.

"After much deliberation, we've come to an important decision that we'd like to share: Echoes will be the last major content patch for Scrolls. We won't be adding features or sets from now on, though we are planning to keep a close eye on game balance. Scrolls will still be available to purchase for the time being, and our servers will run until at least July 1st, 2016. All future proceeds will go towards keeping Scrolls playable for as long as possible," the company said in a statement.

"The launch of the Scrolls beta was a great success. Tens of thousands of players battled daily, and many of them remain active today. Unfortunately, the game has reached a point where it can no longer sustain continuous development."

The move makes Mojang a one franchise studio once again, but considering that franchise is Minecraft it's not a risky strategy. Microsoft, who bought Mojang and the Minecraft IP in September last year for $2.5 billion, made Minecraft the highlight of its HoloLens presentation at E3.

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Latest comments (5)

Paul Johnson Managing Director / Lead code monkey, Rubicon Development6 years ago
We somehow manage to keep Combat Monsters running and constantly being updated despite having less players, probably spending less money, with a smaller dev team and with no external funding support.

This isn't about being "unable", it's about being unwilling. That's their call, but lets call a spade a spade.
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Darren Adams Managing Director, ChaosTrend6 years ago
I bought Scrolls when in it was in Beta and it became apparent that it was intended to be a cash grab and had mediocre game play. Quite probably "unwilling" over "unable".
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Jeremy Glazman Programmer 6 years ago
I think it's safe to say the only "cash grab" in Notch's history was taking billions of dollars from Microsoft, which was a very smart grab. If you've followed Notch at all you know he creates games that he finds enjoyable. And when Scrolls was announced Minecraft was already incredibly profitable, so a cash grab doesn't even make sense.
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Show all comments (5)
Darren Adams Managing Director, ChaosTrend6 years ago
Have you played the game Jeremy? I got it very early in Beta and the store was operational pretty much straight out of the gate. The game is set up in a way that resembles some of the mobile business models which I would say are 'cash grabs'. Focusing on revenue generation before gameplay and late-game mechanics are properly fleshed out is on my list as a cash grab.

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Darren Adams on 1st July 2015 9:56am

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I don't think Notch ever actually worked on Scrolls, not to any significant degree. Never played it myself although my fiancé tried it and found it rather lacklustre.

I always got the impression(possibly unfairly) that Scrolls was mostly just put out there so Mojang wouldn't be a one-game studio. I mean, it makes sense - Minecraft's incredible popularity may not last forever, and putting all your development eggs into one(cube-shaped) basket is rarely a very sensible idea in the long run. Shame it didn't work out, but that's how things go. Not every game is good, not every multiplayer game will stay online forever. Even when you're Mojang.

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Jessica Hyland on 1st July 2015 1:23pm

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