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Oculus Rift will cost in the "$1,500 range" with a PC

CEO hints at setup costs for the virtual reality headset

The Oculus VR CEO has given the first real hint of what the upcoming Oculus Rift virtual reality headset will cost.

"We are looking at an all-in price, if you have to go out and actually need to buy a new computer and you're going to buy the Rift... at most you should be in that $1,500 range," Brendan Iribe said at Re/code's Code Conference.

He added he would like to see that figure eventually drop to under $1,000.

Last week the company released the recommended PC specs for the device which included a Nvidia GTX 970 / AMD 290 setup. The current development kit sells for $350, and it sounds as if the consumer unit will retail at around the same amount.

The Rift is due to be officially released early next year. Sony and Valve are also readying their headsets for a similar timeframe, but Oculus VR is the first to even suggest a retail price.

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Latest comments (9)

Greg Wilcox Creator, Destroy All Fanboys! 6 years ago
Hmmm. So much for the casual "Joe/Jane Gamer" types on a budget getting into VR day one, I suppose.

Still, that's not a "bad" deal if one can assemble his/her own PC and spend a bit less for that part of the equation. The thing is, I'd lay odds on casual consumers still wanting something as simple and plug and play-like as possible.

I'd say if Sony can make a case for their VR being "easier" to use out of the box compared to the Rift, they may see more early success among those who don't know a 3D card from a playing card (and don't care to find out the difference any time soon).

Eh, we'll see where this all goes in under a year, right?
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Julian Williams Founder, WIZDISH Ltd.6 years ago
Yes, I admire their honesty for publishing these figures. I guess its a similar price in relative terms to a VHS machine back in the day but a $100 difference is a big deal in console pricing. However, I don't suppose a lot of PC gamers would consider that to be outrageous and may already own it.
Imagine what would happen if the Morpheus is PC compatible.

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Julian Williams on 28th May 2015 8:02am

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Well, I doubt Sony will make drivers for Win/Mac or Linux. They've a history of failing to do that despite having great hardware with USB ports just waiting to be plugged in.
Plus, I don't think anyone that's following VR should be too surprised. From pretty much day one we're looking at two 1080p synchronized viewports that have of which the refresh rate target is 90 for an actually good experience. That's quite some horsepower needed and there isn't much getting away from that.
As someone who is running a pair of 5 year old AMD 5770s on the alleged "strong" rig (as opposed to the APU on the HTPC) I can and DO sympathize with people that don't want to spend money on new components (and I get bonus points for living in Brazil, where you can start comparing the prices with the UK by multiplying by 10, prolly even more these days) but those constraints are very real.

I feel what's being lost a bit here is that these constraints don't necessarily move too fast, especially when compared with graphics hardware. A GTX970 is just the start of high-end cards nowadays. One or (more likely) two generations in the future and these will go down to the being the top of the mid-range offerings, and those are already much cheaper. Assuming we don't move too fast towards UHD in VR, these hardware requirements will become a much lesser burden. I'm actually worried with morpheus because I have no idea what kind of performance it will deliver with a PS4, which is a much less powerful rig
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Show all comments (9)
Jim Webb Executive Editor/Community Director, E-mpire Ltd. Co.6 years ago
High end discrete graphic card sales are actually a small portion of discrete GPU sales. That means even most current PC gamers will not be able to operate a Rift.

Also to note, those suggested GPUs are 1.5 years old already and still cost ~$300. And the equivalent generation before cost about the same or simply isn't even sold anymore.

Even Jehferson's above crossfired HD 5770's combined are only 55% of the power of one R9 290. And even 5 years ago when they launched were well over $300 for both.

It's going to be a long while before the majority of PC gamers will have a VR headset.
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As I have a vested interest, I will denounce my self first - as a specialist in the early 90's VR boom, and a supporter of the early 2011 emergence of VR, I was looking forward for this movement doing only one thing... Helping all of us establish the Digital Out-of-Home entertainment (DOE) business!

Ever since then I have been told by the "VR Community" that sung the praises for Oculus VR that this latest phase of interest in VR would be for the common main / mainstream... everyone. That the tech would come out in 2014 at a price point of $299, run on any kind of [reasonable] PC and would not make you sick. And the big statement was "...no need for you to be interested Kevin, this VR will be available for anyone, so no one will want or need to go back to the arcades or cybercafe business model!"

Roll forward to 2015 - and we still have not seen hide nor hair of the promised CV1 (now expected Q1/Q2 2016), the "road map" that OVR started with has been "altered" following the acquisition - and the common man has been replaced by the ProSumer! Oh and regarding all that skepticism of my sector! All of a sudden there is a incredible level of interest in my sector and the application of VR in special facilities - where the high prices can by monetized through entrance fees, etc., (see video of 'TheVOID' for a better idea... its trending very highly!)

I want to say good luck to all at Oculus VR - and also to Valve/HTC, Ravor/Sensic, Google and obviously Sony - but please also consider the opportunity for all you lovely development studios in working on the best hardware, the most advance peripherals and the most compelling entertainment environment which money can buy... in the out-of-home business! :)

Edited 1 times. Last edit by kevin williams on 28th May 2015 5:11pm

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Henry Durrant Programmer, SUMO Digital6 years ago
Very opaque.
That doesn't help all those people who won't buy a whole new PC just for an Occulus - ie almost everyone.
Maybe they should have just said " $50 less than Valve say theirs will cost".
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Andrew Jakobs Lead Programmer 6 years ago
I'm pretty sure such hardware isn't actually needed, the problem lies with the developers wanting to add too much detail/objects which wil be the cause of needing such fast hardware.. With lesser detail/objects we can easily push 2 1080x1200 screens @ 90fps..
But people expect Battlefield 4 ultra mode type of graphics, and THAT's not gonna happen, not even on a GTX970..
Some people have just been to spoiled with the highend graphics, they think they need that kind of graphics to enjoy VR... think again.....
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Jim Webb Executive Editor/Community Director, E-mpire Ltd. Co.6 years ago
Andrew, it will get ravaged by critics and consumers if the games require massively reduced geometry, lighting, shaders, etc...

Increasing the depth immersion while drastically reducing the eye candy is not a trade off the industry will accept. Especially not for the price the device currently sits at (you can buy a whole new console for that price).
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Julian Williams Founder, WIZDISH Ltd.6 years ago
@Kevin
True. The arcade market must have been instrumental in establishing the home gaming market and there's no reason why it can't promote VR in the same way. I like your mention of advanced peripherals. VR isn't just about HMDs. VR is a suite of tools that remove the abstraction needed for current gaming and experiences, i.e. the 2D monitor, gamepad, keyboard and mouse. The more you physically move and react as you would for real the better the experience.
Thankfully many companies are starting to use the best equipment available to deliver what they are calling 'enhanced VR' to differentiate from HMD only solutions. For example Architects tell me that the first thing their clients do when they put on an HMD is take a step forward. It's only natural.
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