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Valve letting users sell Steam Workshop content

Skyrim is first game allowing mod makers to publish and sell their creations through Steam

Valve is opening up the Steam marketplace a little bit wider. Today the company announced changes to its Steam Workshop user-generated content system that will allow creators to set prices for their mods and sell them to other users.

The new Steam Workshop marketplace will only work for games that have opted into the feature. The first game to use the new marketplace system is Bethesda Softworks' open-world RPG The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim, with more titles to follow in the coming weeks.

While Valve notes that the Steam Workshop hosts more than 24,000 free mods for the game, creators have already attached prices to mods for in-game items, quests, and other tweaks, like animations for fishing or changes to NPC behavior so they wear weather-appropriate outfits. Creators are able to set prices for their efforts, designating them as free, fixed price, or pay-what-you-want products.

"We think this is a great opportunity to help support the incredible creative work being done by mod makers in the Steam Workshop," Valve's Tom Bui said. "User-generated content is an increasingly significant component of many games, and opening new avenues to help financially support those contributors via Steam Workshop will help drive the level of UGC to new heights."

This is not the first time mod-makers have been able to earn money through their Steam Workshop creations, but the previous process for items to be made available for sale was more selective, with a handful of games allowing users to vote on items that the developers would then integrate into their games. It wasn't until January of this year that the Workshop even added support for third-party games to sell user-made mods.

Valve said it has paid community creators more than $57 million since the Workshop opened in October 2011.

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Latest comments (39)

This is quite exciting news! I just wish any of the games I've been playing lately were on Steam...
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Robert Mac-Donald Game Designer, Lethe Games6 years ago
A donation button would achieve the same (money for Developers, modders and Valve) while keeping the mod community healthy. Mods would be free but Steam would let modders receive donations for it. Then, maybe really big mods would have an upfront payment as they would feel more like expansions than paid DLC.

A lot of people are angry with this decision, and I feel like an added donation system would fix this whole situation.
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Brook Davidson Artist / 3D design 6 years ago
A terrible idea. The whole reason people like modding is because it's free. It's always been that way. While I personally don't mind change, I think this is a little too big of a jump.

Keeping mods free and having donations would be the way to go.

The other reason it's terrible is because i forces you to use steam workshop, rather than say a mod manager which is more common for a game like Skyrim. This means, if I use something like Mod Organizer for skyrim and want the latest version of Wet and Cold, I am pretty much screwed. Even if I was willing to pay for it, i still can't use it unless I stop using Mod Organizer. Which isn't happening.

So not only is this inconvenient for the users, but also the mod authors. I don't understand why these skyrim mod authors went and accepted such a thing. It's like they didn't really think it through. They are going to get chump change in exchange for hate and inconvenience. Even after they return doing the free thing, many people will hold it against them and stop using their mods all together.

The way I have always seen modding is, you do it for yourself and the community. Not for money. If people want to donate, than that is fine. If you want to make money, then become a professional game developer.
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Show all comments (39)
Tom Pickard Founder and Creative Director, Knifey Spoonie Games6 years ago
I'm very torn on this, I think Brooks Idea for a donation button is far better. The core principle for modding is that it's free to try and expereince it. Without the ability to just download and play a mod you would never get it to the tipping point of popularity.

Add to it the fact that most big mods start as a rag tag group of people doing bits and bobs cause they love it.. Who takes the money? do they need contracts when starting? do they need permission off every single person working on the project no matter how big or small their contribution? It's going to open a can of worms imo...

I hope it works out, but I've got a feeling it could cause a lot of drama and confusion, and result in less good mods,

Also if there are paying consumers are there protections? If you buy a mod and it's rubbish or causes the game to crash loads, can you get a refund? Either way I guess we'll find out in the future..
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Brook Davidson Artist / 3D design 6 years ago
@Tom
Yep ,also let's not forget Valve is taking 75% of the cut which to me makes very little sense.
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Shane Sweeney Academic 6 years ago
Is it really 75% all to Valve or is Bethesda getting some of that?
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Morville O'Driscoll Blogger & Critic 6 years ago
But who really donates? Setting prices forces people into making a choice, whereas a donate button is a little... vague?

This is mostly a natural extention of Valve's policy - Instead of users indirectly paying modders through case and skin purchases, for example, they're paying them directly - but I'm not sure it'll reap the same benefits, because, well, modding. On the flip-side, there's no doubt that some modders deserve the cash, and if all this does is weed out a handful of leechers, then it's all good. I'm very curious how this'll affect the competition between Steam Workshop and Nexus Mods.

@ Shane/Brook

Apparently the 75% is split between publisher and Valve, which makes sense - modders are using game content (in some way) and Valve have to maintain servers.

Edit:

The split is bad (50% publisher, 25% Valve, 25% creator (Edit: It's actually 45/30/25) but that may be due to Bethesda being... less than generous. Honestly, so many people complaining, and it's like, whatthehell? Creators can choose payment tiers. Creators don't have to charge, even.

@ Tom

Yup, refunds for mods not working within the first 24 hours. :) ( http://steamcommunity.com/workshop/aboutpaidcontent/ )

Edited 5 times. Last edit by Morville O'Driscoll on 24th April 2015 12:04pm

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Andrew Watson Tools Programmer 6 years ago
Warcraft 3 had a huge map-making community. I think one of the big reasons why it pretty much died when Starcraft 2 came out was because of a similar paid map system. I'd hate to see other modding communities go a similar way because of this.
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Morville O'Driscoll Blogger & Critic 6 years ago
The only way this goes really bad is if every mod maker charges for their mod.

Much as that would amuse me - modders being cast as greedy as Activision or Bethesda - it ain't gonna happen. Free mods - on Steam - will always be around.

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Morville O'Driscoll on 24th April 2015 11:02am

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Tudor Nita Lead Programmer, Gameloft Romania6 years ago
Hard to understand this, unfortunately, common attitude. Content creators deserve to be paid for their work. Nothing more, nothing less.

Nothing is dying, no-one is forcing anyone to sell for cash or to stop modding. If anything, this will bring mods to the attention of the "masses", as opposed to the current niche situation.
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Brook Davidson Artist / 3D design 6 years ago
Here is the thing. Modders don't generally get up one day and make a mod with the hope to get paid, it's never been that way. So saying they deserve to get paid is a load of crap. They do it for themselves, and the community. That is what made modding so great. If they want to earn a little money on the side, that is what donations are for. If you need more, then get a damned job as a game developer. I started out as a modder myself, and charging isn't something I would have ever done.

If I wanted to make money, modding wouldn't have been the answer for me. Modding is something you do, because you want to .. not because it's some sort of business to get paid from.You do it for the community.

Some of you who don't see this as a big deal, in which case you are missing the point. Not everyone has to switch in order for it to ruin modding communities. It only has to be the top mods for a game to move over for it to mess everything up. So now, if I want to use 20+ popular mods .. I will be paying $20+. This locks what made modding great behind a massive pay wall.

Then let's not forget, who is going to be patrolling it all? This is going to turn into what the android app store is. A bunch of copies and crap. So even the main author of the idea behind a mod may not make anywhere near as much as would be worth it, because soon after many copies of similar mods will go up with people trying to make a quick buck.

If anything, this is going to make mods lower quality than it will higher quality. It doesn't benefit the user, who now has to pay even more money on top of that $60 tag + DLC and now mods.

It appalls me to those who are actually ok with this.

I also find it funny, those who say the modders deserve money. Got news for you, FORCING people to pay isn't going to make things better.
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Morville O'Driscoll Blogger & Critic 6 years ago
Here is the thing. Modders don't generally get up one day and make a mod with the hope to get paid, it's never been that way
Never been that way before, you mean. Honestly, Brook, the rest of your post comes off as a variation on the Starving Artist argument. If a modder thinks they should get paid for their work, people either agree, or no-one buys his mod. His work, his rules.
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Brook Davidson Artist / 3D design 6 years ago
@Morville
I am ok with mods making money off of their work. But forcing it, is something I am not ok with. If they think they should be paid, then maybe they should be spending their time on something they can get paid for. Like original work that doesn't rely on another companies game.
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Brook Davidson Artist / 3D design 6 years ago
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=du7oIjBMY3Q
Boogie2988 makes some very good points. I don't agree that it would cause some sort of golden age of mods. The only way that would happen is if every mod was appropriately priced for the amount of content it contains. Wet and Cold, all it does is add some water drip effects, and a few other cold effects and such. It isn't something that vastly changes game play even if it is one of the most popular mods.

If I had to absolutely pay for such a mod, I would be looking at max 25 - 50 cents. It's certainly not worth the price of a DLC. A mod like Falskaar, maybe $1 - 2. I still wouldn't pay full DLC price for a mod that is pretty much as long as a full DLC, mainly because the quality is no where near as good as say an official mod.

I still think it would have been better off with just a donate button.
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Morville O'Driscoll Blogger & Critic 6 years ago
And how many modders have parlayed mod work in a paid job? And how many mods are the equivalent of a new piece of work? Approach modding like art, and paid mods make sense - they're not only new pieces of work standing on the shoulders of professional releases (sometimes changing them dramatically), but also a folio of showing skills and expertise. :)
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Brook Davidson Artist / 3D design 6 years ago
@Morville
You can't approach modding like art, because modding would be the equivalent of making fan art of an already established IP, like pokemon. you wouldn't legally be able to sell it, unless authorized to, in which case I would then consider it merchandise and not fan art.

Such as anyone who sells their mods through steam workshop to me is no longer a mod, it's a paid DLC. The only difference is, it's not nearly as professional quality.

Either way, what matters at the end of the day is... are the consumers happy with this move? As far as I can see, no .. .they are not.
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Morville O'Driscoll Blogger & Critic 6 years ago
Well, agree to disagree. :) But...
Either way, what matters at the end of the day is... are the consumers happy with this move? As far as I can see, no .. .they are not.
Poor reporting is at least partially to blame, I think. Not saying it's great, but when you have people claiming Valve take all 75% (they don't), are getting rid of free mods (they aren't), removing donation links (they aren't)... Well, obviously the public is going to be against it. :/
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T. Elliot Cannon Game Director, Gala Games6 years ago
"A terrible idea. The whole reason people like modding is because it's free."

Players like mods because they are fun and free. Modders love creating something that is theirs in a game they love or that has a strong enough tech/base for their creativity. It's a hobby and this is a good thing. Now if someone wants to make an incredible mod and put a price on it, it enters into a new arena. I think this a valuable experiment that has the potential for success as much as Amazon's Kindle program.

Donations are a hassle. With the workshop, the thought process of deciding what to buy means the seller must also put his best foot forward. His content needs to appeal to the customer, have strong reviews, and visual appeal. He must strive to make something cool, and if he does he gets financial rewards. This is what makes the world go 'round from an idealism perspective. You do what you love and everything else sorts itself out. Over time that pricing points will find equilibrium, just like kindle books have. Even the big print publishers are adopting to how that market evovled.

Lastly. Players want games to consume with fun content. The world today is full of enthusiasts with talent, ability, and passion. Steam workshop provides a great platform for these people. Are you forced to use Amazon?
Everyone benefits from this relationship including publishers and developers. Many developers started this way.

I say awesome.

Edited 2 times. Last edit by T. Elliot Cannon on 24th April 2015 6:00pm

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Brook Davidson Artist / 3D design 6 years ago
So many people on this site seem to always have the opposite opinion of what I would expect. Like as if a lot of you don't understand how this effects consumers negatively .. and not positively. Are you guys even a big part of the modding scene like I am? Or is your opinion based on pretty much nothing at all? https://www.change.org/p/valve-remove-the-paid-content-of-the-steam-workshop
37k and counting so far.
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Robert Mac-Donald Game Designer, Lethe Games6 years ago
You people are also failing to make a parallel with the iOS store.

Upfront payment games almost don't exist in there anymore when compared to the percentage of freemium games. They simply don't sell and the exact same thing is bound to happen to mods with upfront payments. The top mods (which will represent 1% of all mods) will be the ones people will pay for and everything else will be forgotten into obscurity because most people will not be willing to do an upfront payment to test tons of mods even if you can refund later, it īs just a hassle.

If all mods started as free however, word of mouth would make sure lesser mods got discovered and recommended, and eventually someone would donate to the developers of the mods. As it is, these modders have only two options 1) make it free so you get downloads, but no money 2) make it have an upfront cost and see almost no downloads. How is this helping modders make money?

Donations were the way to go to make everyone happy.

I feel people here are speaking more out of an imaginary ideal of what paid mods will be like than actual experience. As Brook mentioned as well, I have just finished playing Fallout New Vegas with 30+ mods, which would make the mods cost the same as I paid for the game, which is absurd in terms of content and development time.
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Brook Davidson Artist / 3D design 6 years ago
Now if someone wants to make an incredible mod and put a price on it, it enters into a new arena. I think this a valuable experiment that has the potential for success as much as Amazon's Kindle program.
It's a terrible experiment because it can ruin what made the modding community good. Clearly you don't understand that.
Donations are a hassle. With the workshop, the thought process of deciding what to buy means the seller must also put his best foot forward. His content needs to appeal to the customer, have strong reviews, and visual appeal.
24 hours. After that, you can't get a refund. Meaning people can release crap, and just make empty promises much like steam green light. It doesn't mean you have to put more effort into it, or have strong reviews. Donations is the way to accomplish what you are saying here. Paying upfront does not prevent crap from being released.

Also donations are a hassle mainly because companies make it a hassle.
Over time that pricing points will find equilibrium, just like kindle books have. Even the big print publishers are adopting to how that market evovled.
I like how you are taking something entirely unrelated and using it as some form of evidence for your claim here. There are plenty of things that are successful and plenty of things that are not. Those things have nothing to do with this. Any example you show where something worked out, I can show you where something didn't. Using fallacy arguments is pretty dumb, please don't do it. I don't care what worked for kindle books and that has nothing to do with this.
Lastly. Players want games to consume with fun content. The world today is full of enthusiasts with talent, ability, and passion. Steam workshop provides a great platform for these people. Are you forced to use Amazon?
Everyone benefits from this relationship including publishers and developers. Many developers started this way.
Again, comparing 2 things that have absolutely nothing to do with each other. You say it benefits everyone, you seem to be forgetting the consumer who is constantly nickled and dimed.
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Nick McCrea Gentleman, Pocket Starship6 years ago
The fear here is obviously that, prior to Valve providing a simple and obvious route to monetisation for quality mods, a lot of talented mod teams would be content with releasing for free and benefiting in other ways - be it altruism, developing skills to get into industry, or simply creative satisfaction.

It's not hard to see, now, that the most high quality mods will have a much greater chance of earning a direct income for their efforts.

This is obviously good for them. It's *less obviously* good for consumers, though I think you can still argue the case that it may attract more and better quality mods, so you may get a better standard of "unofficial DLC" for games which encourage modding communities.

But if you're a massive Skyrim fan, it's kind of a difficult case to make that the current mod setup isn't really meeting your needs - it's huge, it's varied, it's got some incredible quality. It's easy for me to see why a consumer backlash might occur.
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T. Elliot Cannon Game Director, Gala Games6 years ago
"It's a terrible experiment because it can ruin what made the modding community good. Clearly you don't understand that"

I understand modding and development quite well ;)

I don't think Steam Workshop content for sale is ruining the modding community or decreasing what you find good in it. It's providing a distribution network for people that may even allow them to take their creativity many steps further, and if they're good at it, even earn income. Fair play - the good old fashioned USA methods work well.

In regards to this type question.
"Are you guys even a big part of the modding scene like I am? Or is your opinion based on pretty much nothing at all?"
It's easy to look folks up in the industry these days. Most folks who post here work in the industry or are connected to it in some professional way.

Being passionate about modding and what it means to you is great. There are probably lots of other modders who agree with you too. But not everyone will. Most developers will find the idea exciting but at the same time a problem with returns and money exchange for Valve to tackle.
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Brook Davidson Artist / 3D design 6 years ago
@T. Elliot
You do realize this has already caused so much crap in the modding community that it is far from helping.
Chesko, the creator of Frostfall seems to be leaving the modding community entirely because of this. Many modders are taking their mods down due the fear of their work being stolen. It has pitted people against each other. Those for it and those against it.
A system that has pretty much worked just fine, has been sent into chaos with in a day.

So to say it isn't ruining the community is a stretch as it already has made a large effect on it within a day. I don't speak for everyone, but it doesn't take a genius to go on over to the Nexus site to see what the majority think.

Keeping in mind, not many, myself included are against the change entirely. Donations are fine. Essentially do exactly the same thing they are doing now, but make it donations. So you can get the mod free if you so choose. What people are pissed about is the requirement to pay. Especially since you would be paying for a sub par product that may or may not work later down the road or with other mods.

There are so many issues this brings up, and with Valve's lack of support and hands off approach, they are the worst company to have hopes for to do this correctly.

That petition is now at 58k .. and still growing. If it isn't clear yet that the community is against it, I don't know what would make it anymore obvious.
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Morville O'Driscoll Blogger & Critic 6 years ago
I never realised modders were so petulent. Currently, there's no requirement for a mod to even be on Steam Workshop (at least for Skyrim). Can anyone tell me why mod creators aren't just moving to Nexus? Is it because they want the money from Steam, but at the same time don't want to appear greedy, so are throwing a tantrum so they look good in the eyes of the public? At this point in time, I'm far more cynical about the modders motives than I am about even the crazily greedy Bethesda.

Certainly the legal issues/refunds situation needs to be better. But to claim the public is being nickel and dimed, Brook? Hands up if you would pay 5 or 10 bucks for KOTOR 2 Restoration Content mod, or Black Mesa. Or Stalker Complete/Misery.
What people are pissed about is the requirement to pay
Heheh. So blame the creator of the mod. They're the one setting the price, and forcing you to pay.

Edited 2 times. Last edit by Morville O'Driscoll on 25th April 2015 6:12am

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Brook Davidson Artist / 3D design 6 years ago
@Morville
I never said I was unwilling you pay for a mod. A mod like Black Mesa, ya ... I would pay them. However, you are comparing apples to oranges here.

Take a look at what mods are currently on steam workshop. Take a look at what mods exist for Skyrim as a whole. Now tell me .. which ones do you think are actually worth even $1.

Also, what I mean by nickel and dimed, is in gaming in general. Want to buy a game it's about $60. Want the pre-order items which in the past where usually included in the game, it's an extra $10 - 20. DLC $5 - 20. Micro-transactions ... $1 - 5 per item. Modding was the only area where money wasn't involved because it wasn't official content and simply fan made content. Now they are trying to put a price on mods as well. How, in your mind, can you not consider that nickel and dimed?

However, the way I see it is if you are making a mod, you are doing so not because you expect payment for it. The only reason why mod authors are now thinking about it is specifically because Valve and Bethesda approached them and they felt they wanted to be part of something big. They felt it was an opportunity of a life time.

So for a lot of them, it wasn't even the money in general that convinced them. It was the fact that it was Valve and Bethesda that approached them and made the deal sound so appealing. Chesko went into great detail about this, and so did Isoku.

Isoku even specifically said he wasn't expecting it to earn him much money in the least bit.

Of course, these all could just be excuses to try and take the heat off of them.


When you say blame the creators of the mods, let me just say, of course I do. Valve and Bethesda are not without blame though. They are the ones who caused this entire mess.

They could have put something like this into effect countless other ways that would have been better. However, that 75% cut between Valve and Bethesda looked good. So of course they would try and do something so greedy and underhanded.
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Shane Sweeney Academic 6 years ago
Australia has a very large modding community, ModDB is an Australian site, and many visiting international developers before the Indie boom commented on the fact the Aussie development scene were treating Mods like serious stand alone games.

In 2003 a team with the assistance of Screen Australia helped fund Escape From Womera a mod that explored our most infamous immigrant detention centres in the outback which wasn't allowed to be filmed, and the developers at the time had to be anonymous. Escape From Womera is a defining video game in Australian video game history. Damian Scott who worked on the Team Fortress mod continued to work on a series of critically acclaimed mods like Kanonball. I contract for Galactic Cafe, and it's hard to question the artistic value of the original Stanley Parable mod which if monetized really could of assisted the development of the full title.

Modding is a part of our participatory remix culture, most works in this space can't be monetized for copyright reasons, but for those that can I see no reason how it could hurt the Australian community who have always taken modding very seriously, and more opportunities for a business model is change but shouldn't be seen as a bad thing.

Edited 3 times. Last edit by Shane Sweeney on 25th April 2015 1:21pm

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Brook Davidson Artist / 3D design 6 years ago
@Shane
It all depends on the way it's done. Again, I have no problem with modders making money and I myself would gladly pay modder depending on the kind of work they put out.

That isn't what is happening here though. We are talking about any modder, with even the least amount of skill and professionalism can now monetize their work. This needs to be done in a way that prevents the same kind of crap we get on steam green light. Except, in this case it's even worse.

It's like they learned nothing from green light.
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Morville O'Driscoll Blogger & Critic 6 years ago
Okay, I see... What you're wanting is curation/gatekeeping of content, then? So only mods which are worth it are actually charged for? If you're expecting that from Valve, then it likely won't happen, due to their position on openess, and their unwillingness to truly be gatekeepers of content (something they never wanted to be in the first place). I don't think anything is going to replace being a cautious consumer here, to be honest. Read the description, and if you like the sound of it and it's reasonable, buy it. If it's a con, report it and get a refund.

In this sense, I'm arguing a variation of the Market Will Sort Itself Out argument. Bad mods (and creators who take advantage) will eventually be known and users will avoid them. But that will take some time. On the flip-side, this hasn't been done before (not like this) so there will obviously be some time before it's perfected.

Honestly, I can't help but feel that Valve have been naive here. I don't think they expected a modder to be so greedy as to put pop-ups in the free version that disappear if you pay for it. I mean, what kind of person does that? Obviously not someone who is a) community-spirit oriented or b) someone who does it for the passion.

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Morville O'Driscoll on 25th April 2015 6:34pm

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Robert Mac-Donald Game Designer, Lethe Games6 years ago
As I understand, Bethesda and other game companies will be getting a % of the user made mod sells as well?

I fail to see how they deserve any of that money. Windows/Microsoft should not get a cut for every program that is sold or receives donations for its platform. Bethesda did zero % work for the mods that are being sold, so why are they making infinite DLC money now without effort? This does not sound right, nor fair. Sounds like exploitation of other people's work.

I can understand valve taking a cut - the transactions are being performed on their servers, but it ends there.

I guess, legally, the only way to sell a game mod is through an authorization from valve/bethesda, where they ask for a cut since it is their IP. That is just another argument in favor of donations, where there are no legalities attached to it.

Edited 2 times. Last edit by Robert Mac-Donald on 25th April 2015 6:37pm

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Marty Howe Director, Figurehead Studios6 years ago
Screen Australia helped fund Escape From Womera

It's Woomera, not Womera. Only Screen Australia would be dumb enough to fund such a project.

I guess, legally, the only way to sell a game mod is through an authorization from valve/bethesda, where they ask for a cut since it is their IP.

Isn't it the case, that they created the game itself, thus the framework to mod it.

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Marty Howe on 26th April 2015 3:28am

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Morville O'Driscoll Blogger & Critic 6 years ago
Mmm... the publisher cut is an odd one. On the one hand, it makes sense for any game which has had mod tools released for it. On the other, it is pubs profiting from other people's work, and they already profit in the sense that a game's long-tail and brand is burnished by quality mods. Would people still care quite as much about Skyrim if all the mods up to this point had never been produced? Unlikely.

I suppose a positive is that more games may actually support modding, now, with publishers keen to get a slice of future mod profits.

Edit: Regarding "Oh, just have donation links", this comment is interesting: https://www.reddit.com/r/gaming/comments/33uplp/mods_and_steam/cqolxym

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Morville O'Driscoll on 26th April 2015 7:29am

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Brook Davidson Artist / 3D design 6 years ago
@Morville
Oh because 1 person has not got a donation since they started modding, it doesn't work?
Umm or maybe ... people just didn't think about it because he himself never mentioned it. People don't just come around and donate to random modders when it's never been out there before.

Even the owner of Nexus mods has stated their donation feature was so obscure, that most people didn't even know it existed.

Just like a youtuber isn't going to get donations until they make it known they are accepting donations. Either through paypal, patreion or what not. To claim it doesn't work when it works for countless other things is horse crap. Of course it freaking works.

Clearly the countless amount of people on patreon must know something he does not.

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Brook Davidson on 26th April 2015 12:15pm

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David Canela Game & Audio Designer 6 years ago
As long as it's still possible to share your mods for free, I don't understand why people get so upset about this. It's the creator's right to choose whether they want to share for free or ask for money. as for the revenue share, I think what is fair depends a lot on the specific case and ultimately, every dev will have decide for themselves how much they want to encourage paid mods ( free mods remain unaffected by revenue split decisions, obviously ). They're entirely within their rights to decide whatever. If the modders don't like it, they're free to either just create free mods, as they have been doing so far, or go mod some other game. Obviously, not all devs will make smart choices here, but that's ok. I'm pretty sure Bethesda will have considered the ramifications of asking for such a big cut and possibly appearing greedy.
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Brook Davidson Artist / 3D design 6 years ago
@David
I also don't think it's an issue of modders want to charge. I am more irritated in the way it was done and the current system.

But hey, maybe I am over reacting even now. Can only wait and see.
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Morville O'Driscoll Blogger & Critic 6 years ago
Heh. :) I wasn't using that as an example of why donations don't work at all, more an example of why they aren't the be-all-and-end-all. I'm sure the fact that he didn't promote donations more is as much to blame as people being selfish, but that raises the question of how much promotion is too much? (Not trying to be argumentative, btw. :) ).
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Brook Davidson Artist / 3D design 6 years ago
@Morville
On the contrary, he didn't promote donations at all. So it's clear he didn't do too much, because he didn't do any at all XD. I also doubt selfishness is to blame for him not getting any donations because he never asked or mentioned it.

Just because someone isn't getting paid, doesn't mean it's because people are selfish. There are many ways to be grateful other than giving money. So unless the person makes it known they are accepting donations, then that is the only thing that can be blamed. He didn't ask, and people don't read minds.

Also, no worries, I like a good discussion and don't see it as argumentative.
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Robert Mac-Donald Game Designer, Lethe Games6 years ago
Edit: Regarding "Oh, just have donation links", this comment is interesting: https://www.reddit.com/r/gaming/comments/33uplp/mods_and_steam/cqolxym
It is a very different scenario when Valve supports donations directly on their software, and they give you proper feedback for it. Thatīs the point.

Thatīs like saying donations don't work because you made your own website and asked for it, dismissing services like Kickstarter and Patreon. They are different platforms that work really well to give development funding/donations to creators.
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David Canela Game & Audio Designer 6 years ago
@Brook

I guess we'll see how it evolves and for how many modders going the commercial route is actually attractive, and how devs react to this (wouldn't be surprised if we saw a wide range of revenue share decisions from them, from 0% to Bethesda's 45%). But even if it's just 1% percent of modders for whom selling their mods makes sense, as long as the other 99% aren't impaired by that new possibility somehow, I believe we'll have gained something. Although I'll agree it makes for s a lot of potential conflict between modders with unauthorized uses etc., revenue sharing disputes etc.
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