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XBL, PSN, WiiWare the "true battle" says Square Enix boss

Yoichi Wada talks casual games and not treating Eidos employees as "slaves"

Square Enix president Yoichi Wada has again spoken of his attempts to pursue "globalisation and a transformation to become network-centric", as he discusses the company's continued attempts to diversify its portfolio.

Speaking in a new interview with website VentureBeat, Wada insisted that of rival Japanese and Western publishers, "nobody has succeeded at globalisation." He attributes this to a tendency for parent companies to maintain too much control over subsidiaries or third parties - a mistake Square Enix does not intend to repeat.

"We acquired Eidos. By doing this, we have incorporated them in our group. They have become part of our family. It was not like we acquired slaves," he said."What I wanted to do is create an environment where completely different ethnic groups can co-exist in the same company. It is important that what’s in America should be handled by Americans. The same goes in Europe and in Japan."

Discussing casual games, such as Zynga's FarmVille, Wada stated again that traditional game developers were largely incapable of making such products." We have to use people who have not been involved in traditional game making," he said. "We try to get people who have not been involved in game studios before. In Japan, we recruited dozens of people as a group from another entity."

Wada also repeated his view, expressed in a recent interview with GamesIndustry.biz, that network services were of far greater importance to the future of the industry than new hardware such as Kinect and the 3DS.

"Frankly, these are not the most essential parts of the console technology," he said. "The key parts of the console technology are Xbox Live, PlayStation Network and WiiWare. The true battle among these things is taking place very quietly. We will see the results of that battle two or three years from now."

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Latest comments (3)

Haven Tso Web-based Game Reviewer 6 years ago
It is always interesting to see Square Enix making such huge statements and then they just publish bad games one after another. Seriously the number of mediocre games that they have published in the last few years have turned away their supporters to see their releases as "must have" items. The issue here is not the mode of delivery but the quality of software. This is particularly obvious with Final Fantasy XIII that Square Enix's efforts to appease to the mass has ended up with a game that doesn't play like Final Fantasy (in terms of quality) but a hybrid of everything that didn't do any good to the franchise. Sure, they sold 5 million units but the lost of confidence in franchise will eclipse future games eventually.
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Matthew Sainsbury Journalist 6 years ago
Do you have anything to back any of that up? Square Enix, to me, look like they're quite on the ball in predicting future market trands, and are doing a good job of setting themselves up to take advantage of those trends.
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@Tso: I agree with you, specially if we refer to FFXII and FFXIII which were total "s**t" (personal point of view). Anyway, I'm giving them a last chance with FFXIII versus. If they mess up the game as they did for the others, they can say bye to my support( and of others ... ).
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