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Trion, XSEED join the ESA

Mon 20 Apr 2009 10:04pm GMT / 6:04pm EDT / 3:04pm PDT
PoliticsPublishing

Two new publishers become members of trade organisation

Internet game company Trion World Network and game publisher XSEED Games have joined the Entertainment Software Association, a press release issued today said.

"The ESA will benefit greatly from the addition of Trion World Network, and XSEED Games, two truly innovative companies that are at the leading edge of the computer and video game movement," ESA CEO Michael D Gallagher. "We look forward to supporting their efforts through our work on the key public policy issues facing the entertainment software industry, including piracy, intellectual property rights and freedom of speech."

Trion World Network, formed in 2006 by EA vet Lars Buttler and Might & Magic creator Jon Van Caneghem, acts as both publisher and developer of "server-based games and original entertainment for the connected world."

XSEED Games is a traditional games publisher founded in 2004 "to cross pollinate the avid gaming cultures of Japan and North America." Titles released by XSEED include Retro Game Challenge and Shadow Hearts: From the New World.

"The association is dedicated to bolstering the interests of organizations within the interactive entertainment arena and with its support we will continue to develop and publish dynamic, connected games on the Trion Platform, as Trion strives to lead our industry in its transformation from packaged goods software to games as a service," said Trion CEO Lars Buttler.

"This will be a critical year for gamers, so we look forward to working together to deliver quality products and experiences that further supports and validates the games industry’s position within the entertainment sector," said XSEED president Jun Iwasaki.

The ESA acts as a trade organisation for US game publishers, and owns the popular Electronic Entertainment Expo (E3). The organisation recently revisited its association fees, which had reportedly prevented many publishers from becoming members.

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