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Robot Entertainment selects Trinigy's Vision Engine for new IP

Ex Halo Wars developer signs licensing deal with Trinigy to create multi-platform title

Robot Entertainment, the newly-formed studio made up of former Ensemble employees, has entered into a licensing agreement with Trinigy that will enable the studio use of the Vision Engine on a new unannounced IP it's working on.

Following Microsoft's closure of Ensemble, which created Age of Empire III and Halo Wars, several of its original founders set up Robot Entertainment in February this year. The Dallas-based company currently employs 45 ex-Ensemble developers, and recently announced it will continue working with Microsoft to supply additional online content for its games, alongside creating its own original IP.

The studio's agreement with Trinigy will grant it the rights to develop a multi-platform game using Trinigy's Vision Engine; an engine which out-delivered its rivals according to Robot lead programmer, Vijay Thakkar.

"The Vision Engine has clearly been designed with a focus on a powerful set of engine features that do not compromise full developer flexibility," said Thakkar, in a statement. "Throughout our evaluation of the industry's premium engines, the Vision engine consistently stood out in terms of performance and how quickly our developers could see their ideas running in game. The stellar level of support, integration of third-party technologies and robust architecture made choosing the Vision Engine an easy decision for our studio and has allowed us to quickly build momentum on our new project."

"Robot Entertainment has the experience and talent to make ground-breaking games that set new standards in the industry," added Daniel J Conradie, president and CEO at Trinigy Inc. "Our success and momentum continue to be validated by distinguished AAA teams like the one at Robot Entertainment. We are excited to support this extremely talented team on their next eagerly awaited title."

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