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Rebellion "disappointed" with Australia's banning of AvP

Refuses to censor the title, which has become latest refused rating

Rebellion has said it is disappointed with the decision of Australia's classification board to ban the release of Aliens vs Predator but that it won't release a censored version in its place.

The game has become the latest to be refused a rating by the board for its violent content. The board's full report released to Gamespot, stated: "The game contains first-person perspective, close-up depictions of human characters being subjected to various types of violence, including explicit decapitation and dismemberment as well as locational damage such as stabbing through the chest, mouth, throat, or eyes."

In a statement, Rebellion CEO Jason Kingsley said the company was disappointed its upcoming title had been banned in the country, but he added he was in agreement the game was not suitable for minors.

"As we understand the law in that country the authorities had no choice as we agree strongly that our game is not suitable for game players who are not adults," he said.

"The content of AvP is based on some of the most innovative and iconic horror movies, and as such we wanted to create a title that was true to the source material. It is for adults, and it is bloody and frightening, that was our intent.

"We will not be releasing a sanitised or cut down version for territories where adults are not considered by their governments to be able to make their own entertainment choices."

The banning of the game closely follows that of Left 4 Dead 2. After losing an appeal to release the full, uncensored game, Valve released a censored version in Australia. However subsequent reviews of the cut game were unfavourable.

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Latest comments (1)

Mat Bettinson Business Development Manager, Tantalus Media7 years ago
Hey look, just make the game available on some digital distribution system somewhere in the world that doesn't care if it sells to Australia and doesn't worry too hard about what version it's distributing (unlike the way Steam has gone).

Then the entire market will just buy from that. Same sort of deal as Germany really.

Otherwise though, good to see Jason pointing out it's not an authority problem, it's a law problem. Which obviously in turn is a Michael Atkinson problem but I'll try avoid sounding like a broken record on that matter...
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