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IGDA adopts zero tolerance policy on harassment

"We cannot succeed, as individuals, artists, or companies, if our industry tolerates harassment"

In the wake of #MeToo trending on social media, the IGDA today released a statement in support of those efforts and adopting a zero tolerance stance toward harassment and violence of any kind among its staff and volunteers, or at its events. The full text of the statement follows:

This week, game developers from around the world used #MeToo on social media to acknowledge their experiences with sexual harassment and assault. The prevalence of sexual harassment and assault in our community is deeply disturbing, and demands action from every game developer to ensure the safety and support of all of our colleagues and community members. We all must do a better job of welcoming, and protecting, all game developers so that our community, craft, and industry can thrive.

Accordingly, the IGDA is announcing a zero-tolerance policy towards all forms of harassment and violence. This position is implied in the IGDA Code of Ethics, and we are stating explicitly that harassment and/or violence of any kind, on the part of any IGDA Board or staff member or volunteer leader, or at any IGDA-affiliated event, will not be tolerated.

All developers play a part in supporting an industry where we can create wonderful things; we cannot succeed, as individuals, artists, or companies, if our industry tolerates harassment. We encourage game developers around the world to join the IGDA in adopting a zero-tolerance policy towards harassment and violence, in committing to swift and fair response and resolution to any complaints, in protecting the safety of anyone who has been the victim of harassment, and in supporting a diverse and inclusive workplace and community.

Together, we can make meaningful change to our industry if we commit to taking immediate and significant steps to develop an industry, and world, that values the contributions of every individual, regardless of gender, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, disability, religion, physical appearance, or any other characteristic.

This is not the first time the IGDA has waded into the issue. In 2013, the group saw veteran developer Brenda Romero resign from her position of co-chair of the IGDA's Women in Games special interest group after an IGDA party featured scantily clad women dancers. In response, the IGDA adopted a series of new policies for its events.

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