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Far Cry 4 to also skip playable female character due to workload

Far Cry 4 to also skip playable female character due to workload

Wed 11 Jun 2014 9:19pm GMT / 5:19pm EDT / 2:19pm PDT

"It's really depressing because we almost... we were inches away from having you be able to select a girl or a guy as your co-op buddy"

While many in the industry continue to discuss the unfortunate exclusion of a playable female character in Assassin's Creed Unity, it's now been revealed that another hotly anticipated Ubisoft game will also miss out on having a playable female character. Far Cry 4 director Alex Hutchinson told Polygon that his team was only "inches away" from being able to include a selectable co-op female character.

"It's really depressing because we almost... we were inches away from having you be able to select a girl or a guy as your co-op buddy when you invite someone in. And it was purely a workload issue because we don't have a female reading for the character, we don't have all the animations," he explained. "And so it was this weird issue where you could have a female model that walked and talked and jumped like a dude."

It's a similar explanation to the one given by Ubisoft technical director James Therien, who said that adding a female character to the new Assassin's Creed would "double the work" and that "it was a question of focus and a question of production."

For its part, Ubisoft did comment that "We look forward to introducing you to some of the strong female characters in Assassin's Creed Unity," even though they won't be playable, and Hutchinson, too, promised, "I can guarantee you that in the future, moving forward, this sort of stuff will go away. As we get better technology and we plan for it in advance and we don't have a history on one rig and all this sort of stuff. We had very strong voices on the team pushing for that and I really wanted to do it, we just couldn't squeeze it in in time. But on the other hand we managed to get more of the other story characters to be women."

Far Cry 4 is shipping on November 18 for current-gen and next-gen consoles and PC.

42 Comments

Greg Wilcox
Creator, Destroy All Fanboys!

2,175 1,124 0.5
Well, there's always Rainbow Six Siege and The Division, which both allow for playable female characters...

Posted:3 months ago

#1

Aaron Johnson

22 34 1.5
Don't forget X-Com. My whole team is female. I'm just waiting for someone to mod the Council Spokesman's voice into John Forsythe's from Charlie's Angels.

Posted:3 months ago

#2

Rick Lopez
Illustrator, Graphic Designer

1,269 942 0.7
Whelp.... UbiSoft is totally screwed now...

... first Assasins creed and now this game... lets hate, crucify and scorn ubisoft for doing this. they are evil I tell ya'

I guess with games like rayman, valient hearts and child of light, ubisoft isnt doing enough to diversify its catalog of games... Well is the dog in Valient hearts male or female?... wonder if people are gonna argue over that too.

Anyway, Im still praying they give us a "Beyond Good and Evil 2"... if anybody remembers that game... that had a female character...

Edited 2 times. Last edit by Rick Lopez on 12th June 2014 2:19am

Posted:3 months ago

#3

Paul Jace
Merchandiser

925 1,381 1.5
Whats next, a Tomb Raider game where Lara is a dude?

Posted:3 months ago

#4

Greg Wilcox
Creator, Destroy All Fanboys!

2,175 1,124 0.5
Popular Comment
Heh, that would kind of be what Uncharted is, Paul... :D

Posted:3 months ago

#5

Bonnie Patterson
Freelance Narrative Designer

159 431 2.7
Popular Comment
I'm going to skip Far Cry 4 due to workload.

Posted:3 months ago

#6

Julian Beck
HR Consultant

39 45 1.2
Popular Comment
Is that kind of "debate" now added to all upcoming games???
ok, let's see...
Uncharted! Change to female Drake, asap.
Super Mario! Change to female, asap.
Bioshock Infinite! main character to female, sidekick to male, asap.
Tomb Raider!...wait, oh, it's already female, so change to male, asap.
Mirror's Edge! Change to male Faith, asap.

And most important do the changes with no sense in mind, do it only because :)). Forget the story, forget your original character development and setting. Just change every male to female and vice versa...ASAP.
...
When does this madness end?

Edited 3 times. Last edit by Julian Beck on 12th June 2014 8:50am

Posted:3 months ago

#7

Alfonso Sexto
Lead Tester

807 637 0.8
I can't believe I am reading this again...

Posted:3 months ago

#8

Alfonso Sexto
Lead Tester

807 637 0.8
"we were inches away from having you be able to select a girl or a guy as your co-op buddy"

Guess recycling the simplistic animation from FC3 Co-op was too much workload too

Posted:3 months ago

#9

Christian Keichel
Journalist

679 925 1.4
Asking for playable female characters in Far Cry or Assassin's Creed obviously is just asking for the double ammount of animation data, because these pixel puppets aren't characters. regardless if they are male of female.
Some of the best written characters in video games are females: Cate Archer in No One Lives Forever, Heather Mason in Silent Hill 3 or Jade in Beyond Good and Evil. These characters are so interesting not because they are female, but because they are well written and believable, they stand next to Max Payne and Solid Snake. But that's the problem, characters like Jade AND charcters like Max Payne aren't made any more.
I wish there would be more interesting and believable characters in video games, to be more precise, I wish there would be more characters in video games at all.
But the call for having an optional playable female pixel puppet in every video game is the exact opposite. It's the idea, that video game characters only exist to project your power fantasies to the screen, nothing I am interested in.

I wish video games would give me characters like Katniss Everdeen or Wonder Woman, but obviously games aren't as mature as Young Adult novels and Super Hero comics.

Edited 2 times. Last edit by Christian Keichel on 12th June 2014 9:34am

Posted:3 months ago

#10

Morville O'Driscoll
Blogger & Critic

1,536 1,338 0.9
@ Julian

The thing is, the character was all set to be a man or woman. This wasn't a senseless change due to any outside pressure:
we were inches away from having you be able to select a girl or a guy as your co-op buddy when you invite someone in. And it was purely a workload issue
Edit:
"And so it was this weird issue where you could have a female model that walked and talked and jumped like a dude."
Genuine question: Would anyone have cared? Okay, it would look a bit jarring, but... I honestly think the positives ("woman as possible co-op character") would have offset the negatives ("Weird looking movement"). When half the industry doesn't care about 1080p/60fps and optimising for PC, discarding a woman as co-op character because the animations would've been janky is a bit much. (imo :) )

Edited 2 times. Last edit by Morville O'Driscoll on 12th June 2014 9:25am

Posted:3 months ago

#11
So, the conclusion is - for all UBisoft products, there is one awesome recycled animation set for any Male avatar, but less so for a female

Posted:3 months ago

#12

Darren Adams
Managing Director

240 436 1.8

Posted:3 months ago

#13

Andrew Watson
Programmer

92 200 2.2
Popular Comment
@Samuel:
I don't know about GI, but gender issues generate tons more views for articles on other sites = more ad views = more money.

All I care about is how the gameplay is. What's different since the last far cry? What are some cool new things you can do in it that you couldn't in the last ones? What does it offer over other open world adventure games? Nobody reports on this.

I don't really care what gender the protagonist is since all I'm going to be seeing is their backs most of the time since there's more important stuff going on like being shot at

No matter what you do there's always going to be people complaining about the main character and representation. Okay so you add a gender choice. Now you're a racist. Okay so now you add some race options as well. Now you're supporting thin privilege or some other crap. If you keep catering to every complaint then going to be cutting so much actual game development time that there's not going to be much game left.

Posted:3 months ago

#14
Samuel, you are surrounded by a community of your peers, and I think you do yourself a great disservice with comments of that nature. It's not necessary to post a comment, so please refrain if that's all you have to offer.

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Matthew Handrahan on 12th June 2014 10:52am

Posted:3 months ago

#15

Julian Beck
HR Consultant

39 45 1.2
to quote my own comment:
Uncharted! Change to female Drake, asap.
Super Mario! Change to female, asap.
Bioshock Infinite! main character to female, sidekick to male, asap.
Tomb Raider!...wait, oh, it's already female, so change to male, asap.
Mirror's Edge! Change to male Faith, asap.
yes, that's all ironic content. Bottom line for me:
Developers and Publishers, just choose in refer to game story or game philosophy if male or female characters fit better. I'd like to play games which offer a coherent game experience more than just a character which was generated by a gender battle.

Posted:3 months ago

#16

Paolo Giunti
Narrative Designer

36 73 2.0
Hold it there, Julian.
There's a difference between a character with a defined role within a story (which is designed to match the feel and atmosphere of the game's narrative) and one that only serves as an avatar for the player (which are representative of the players themselves).

Arguing about the gender choice of the first is absolutely silly, but for the second there actually is a point: by reducing the variety of available avatars you're limiting the number of players that feel properly represented in online game ...and kinda sends the message that those who are not are less important.

Posted:3 months ago

#17

Tim Ogul
Illustrator

335 462 1.4
Heh, that would kind of be what Uncharted is, Paul... :D
Yeah, but Uncharted doesn't sell as well as Tomb Raider, so clearly they're doing it wrong.
Genuine question: Would anyone have cared? Okay, it would look a bit jarring, but... I honestly think the positives ("woman as possible co-op character")
Every single person who is complaining now would be complaining then too. It's not a battle you can win as a developer so it's best to ignore the issue entirely. Even Bioware catches heat.
Arguing about the gender choice of the first is absolutely silly, but for the second there actually is a point: by reducing the variety of available avatars you're limiting the number of players that feel properly represented in online game ...and kinda sends the message that those who are not are less important.
Not really. It depends on how much work is involved. If the avatar options they give you are just the basic NPCs, and the NPCs served a purpose in the solo campaign and perform the same tasks in MP, then it stands to reason that the selection will be just what the NPCs already exist, and that may not always be a representative batch. If they go out of their way to create multiple bespoke characters with unique models, skeletons, animation sets, etc. then they should probably give consideration to gender and racial variety. It's not always so simple though as just "oh, if they can do this, then doing that should be no problem," sometimes it's a problem, and deserves to be respected as such. You don't know.

Posted:3 months ago

#18

Morville O'Driscoll
Blogger & Critic

1,536 1,338 0.9
Every single person who is complaining now would be complaining then too.
But about a different thing, surely? Complaining about the "masculinity" of an animation might be tangentially related to the points being raised here, but it would be hard to complain quite so vociferously when the developer/publisher has actually included a woman.
It's not a battle you can win as a developer so it's best to ignore the issue entirely.
Ignorance doesn't work. Not for any industry. Certainly you might be correct on the first point - there's a certain damned-if-you-do, damed-if-you-don't implication to all this - but that doesn't mean devs/pubs should ignore the issue, or "no comment" to the press. Change is hard, but worthwhile.
Even Bioware catches heat.
In my opinion, BioWare catches heat because a lot of what they do is badly written, lacking finesse or subtlety. I was actually thinking of complaints against BioWare when I made my "dudebro" comment in the other thread - straight male gamer, complaining about having LGBT options "rammed down their throats", and wanting to just play a dude who gets off with women. (There's been multiple threads on the social.bioware.com forums in the past, saying/implying this exact thing).

Posted:3 months ago

#19

Paolo Giunti
Narrative Designer

36 73 2.0
It's not always so simple though as just "oh, if they can do this, then doing that should be no problem," sometimes it's a problem, and deserves to be respected as such. You don't know.
As i mentioned in another comment, i don't know what particular challenges they might have encountered and I'm keen on giving them the benefit of the doubt regarding the claim that the lack of female characters is due to technical reasons (although, when this happens on two distinct games developed by different teams i start to wonder: "is it, really?").

Point is that, whatever the reason, they're missing out on an important feature. And if you consider the fact that this feature was actually present in previous installments of the game it adds a lot to the general disappointment.

Posted:3 months ago

#20

Greg Wilcox
Creator, Destroy All Fanboys!

2,175 1,124 0.5
Call me crazy, but I thought this was a gag by Ubisoft when I first read it. Why? Call me crazy again, but I've NEVER thought of Far Cry as a game that (*gasp*) NEEDED a female lead (*Yikes!*).

Explain: I tend to turn my brain off except for concentrating on the environments and stuff they keeps trying to kill my character in those FC games and other shooters, just like in any game I play as a female (by choice or because it's a game with a female in it as a lead), I end up focusing on surviving.

Then again, given the story driven nature (and first person view, save for cut scenes) of far Cry, it would be interesting to see a female lead outside of MP just to see how she's written. Say, a female soldier or mercenary trapped behind enemy lines who doesn't want to be seen as a victim by her enemies, some of whom will underestimate her because she's a woman (because, you know - we men do that on occasion)? An ex-soldier on a holiday who gets caught up in a revolution and has to get out alive using her skills and wits? A normal civilian forced to take up arms against the people raiding the village she's in? I'd play a game with those ladies in it and enjoy it if it was done well.

Off topic (and not even serious, but true): I think the main thing that bugs me in some games is outfit coordination. Like why the hell does my demon hunter (or hell any character in Diablo III) end up looking as if she's/he's dressed herself/himself in a dark room while blindfolded? Green and black pants, gold armor, brown boots, copper colored crown, spiked two-tone shoulder pads and blue/silver gloves? Blech!

Posted:3 months ago

#21
@Andrew Watson

Hi Andrew, I've written a few articles for GI about gender issues, and I can promise you that my motives for doing so are never "ad views." If that was our motive for anything it would be wall to wall GTA and COD all year round. As a female gamer I'm interested in how I'm represented (or not) in the games I love and the issues surrounding that.

I care about gameplay too, Far Cry 3 was a brilliant game, but the issue here is that for both Far Cry and Unity Ubisoft itself has raised the point that it considered playable female characters, and decided against them. That decision is what's interesting and merits further discussion, not just which gender they settled on for the hero.

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Rachel Weber on 12th June 2014 3:25pm

Posted:3 months ago

#22

Mikko Heikkilä
Game Artist / 3D modeler

12 20 1.7
So, the team didn't have time to polish a feature to a sufficiently high standard and decided to cut it. The team was probably on a fixed deadline and something had to give. Whether or not the developers should have given us a virtual Conchita Wurst, or omitted some other feature instead, is a matter of opinion, and I won't discuss it here.

Having a choice of multiple genders, while important, is not a core feature in this genre. You can still play the game and experience all the content regardless of what kind of plumbing the game character has. If someone feels his/her enjoyment is connected to the gender of his/her avatar, I can respect that stance. And he/she is free to vote with his/her wallet. But I still hope developers continue to prioritize features that add to the game experience regardless of gender.

Posted:3 months ago

#23

James Brightman
Editor in Chief

228 272 1.2
I always love when people accuse us of doing things for ad impressions. We're not a very attractive site for impressions compared to consumer publications like IGN or Gamespot. They dwarf our traffic and get tons of impressions for advertisers.

Posted:3 months ago

#24

Andrew Watson
Programmer

92 200 2.2
@Rachel
I've written a few articles for GI about gender issues, and I can promise you that my motives for doing so are never "ad views."
That's good to hear. I think some other sites are very suspect of doing that though but at least GI isn't (I'm not going to name names though)

@James
I did not accuse you

Posted:3 months ago

#25

Bo Larsen
Reviewer

4 0 0.0
Well, with statements like that from Ubisoft they are really setting themselves up. It almost seems like a tactic to drum up attention to your game in the middle of all the E3 buzz.

They could just as well had gone out and said "Our original vision for Far Cry 4 is that your co-op partner will be the memorable character Hurk"

Yes, they actually marketed one of their characters as "memorable" in Far Cry 3. Here's the press text from that pre-order DLC:



Anyway, if I was a proper marketing scumbag, I'd probably be of the opinion that "There is no such thing as bad publicity" and then throw out bait like this to be gobbled up by the gaming press, because gender issues are HUGE right now... and I bet there are some people out there who are out to capitalize on that fact.

Edited 2 times. Last edit by Bo Larsen on 12th June 2014 5:00pm

Posted:3 months ago

#26

Emily Knox
Associate Designer

47 96 2.0
The original question to Therien about why there aren't playable female characters in AC: Unity, could have been posed to a number of developers at E3 who haven't chosen to make female playable characters, and I dare to say you would get a similar answer and all the flak would be aimed at another studio.

We can guess and argue about how much work it would be to do, the interesting aspect to me is the choice not to do it. It is inarguably "some" amount of work and it is their choice. In a slightly similar vein I remember how disappointed I was to see female names disappear from Grid 2 after being present previously, someone chose to do that, too.

Posted:3 months ago

#27

Greg Wilcox
Creator, Destroy All Fanboys!

2,175 1,124 0.5
@Emily: I wonder if that Grid 2 decision was based on info gathered from wherever it's gathered as to the actual user base? Granted, I've played racing games that allowed the choice of female drivers/co-drivers/navigators for quite a while, but I have the feeling that some companies may be using player data as a way to streamline games to their target demographic as a means of cutting development costs and time.

This could be one of the things Ubisoft considered without fully grasping the ramifications, but that's more a wild guess on my part. Still, I guess it's kind of easy to hop over about a segment of your base when you turn them all into numbers and see one side of that chart with the line up to the ceiling and the other somewhat lower...

Posted:3 months ago

#28

Gil Salvado
3D/2D Artist

33 37 1.1
*cough* "We invent when we need to invent" *cough*

Posted:3 months ago

#29

Tim Ogul
Illustrator

335 462 1.4
But about a different thing, surely? Complaining about the "masculinity" of an animation might be tangentially related to the points being raised here, but it would be hard to complain quite so vociferously when the developer/publisher has actually included a woman.
You would think, but no, the people that are complaining now would complain just as viciously. The subject doesn't really matter, they just want something to complain about. Look at the reaction Tomb Raider got two years ago for presenting a female character that might not be 100% on top of everything.
Ignorance doesn't work. Not for any industry. Certainly you might be correct on the first point - there's a certain damned-if-you-do, damed-if-you-don't implication to all this - but that doesn't mean devs/pubs should ignore the issue, or "no comment" to the press. Change is hard, but worthwhile.
Well look, if they can add female characters and stuff, then that's fine, nobody's saying that they shouldn't, but if they can't then they can't, and there's no words they can say that will make the gender trolls fine with that, so there's no point engaging them. If a reporter insists on grilling you about the gender inclusivity of your game then you've already lost the narrative, don't give them any soundbites to run with.
As i mentioned in another comment, i don't know what particular challenges they might have encountered and I'm keen on giving them the benefit of the doubt regarding the claim that the lack of female characters is due to technical reasons (although, when this happens on two distinct games developed by different teams i start to wonder: "is it, really?").
Yes, because when the same issue occurs with two different but similar projects, the rational response IS to assume that both developers are just full of ####, rather than that they both share the same technical hurdles because they are similar products. It's these sorts of assumptions that prove my point about the no-win nature of this issue.
Hi Andrew, I've written a few articles for GI about gender issues, and I can promise you that my motives for doing so are never "ad views." If that was our motive for anything it would be wall to wall GTA and COD all year round.
Well at the very least there are four of these stories in your pinned "top six" stories, and the last two likely dabble in the topic as well. During E3, the biggest source of game industry news for the year, you have stuffed the most prominent place on your site with stories about Ubisoft's limited inclusion of female characters, rather than with stories about the games that DO feature female characters or DO innovate, such as Splatoon or RotTR. I don't have internal metrics like you do, but my assumption is that these gender issues threads drive a lot more pageviews than stories about how well GTA sells, just because while the latter game may be fun, the stories about the game are not. A story about GTA selling a zillion copies is just dog bites man, it's something that should be noted, but is not exactly thrilling news, and people can get the gist of it from the headline. A good gender controversy though, that's sexy, it gets eyes on the page, gets them coming back for more. If you hadn't realized that by now, you've been missing out.
I care about gameplay too, Far Cry 3 was a brilliant game, but the issue here is that for both Far Cry and Unity Ubisoft itself has raised the point that it considered playable female characters, and decided against them. That decision is what's interesting and merits further discussion, not just which gender they settled on for the hero.
But the way you phrased that is basically inflammatory. You want to make this into an "issue." A more neutral way to present the same facts is that they both feature male leads, and have chosen not to put the work into adding a completely different secondary model and animation set. The gender of that secondary model and animation set is incidental to their reasons.

Posted:3 months ago

#30

Morville O'Driscoll
Blogger & Critic

1,536 1,338 0.9
You would think, but no, the people that are complaining now would complain just as viciously.
As I note on one of the other threads, this is just going round and round... I would like to say, though, that the above sentence does no-one any favours. Generalising isn't useful, and I know for a fact that I, personally, wouldn't complain in the example I gave, even though I am complaining now.

(Not meant to be argumentative, btw. Peace. :) )

Edited 3 times. Last edit by Morville O'Driscoll on 12th June 2014 9:27pm

Posted:3 months ago

#31

Paolo Giunti
Narrative Designer

36 73 2.0
Yes, because when the same issue occurs with two different but similar projects, the rational response IS to assume that both developers are just full of ####, rather than that they both share the same technical hurdles because they are similar products. It's these sorts of assumptions that prove my point about the no-win nature of this issue.
For a fact, i didn't assume anything. That's what YOU are saying, not me ...and i would really appreciate if you don't lever my words in order to have them carry a different weight that the one i meant, thankyouverymuch.

With the line between brackets I was pointing out how we have two teams on two separate projects and both deemed the same feature expendable. It might be an unfortunate coincidence, but it's not that unreasonable to wonder if there's something else behind these decisions.
And to make this abundantly clear, Tim, I am not drawing any conclusions here. I'm just not taking for granted what they said either.

Posted:3 months ago

#32

Tim Ogul
Illustrator

335 462 1.4
With the line between brackets I was pointing out how we have two teams on two separate projects and both deemed the same feature expendable. It might be an unfortunate coincidence, but it's not that unreasonable to wonder if there's something else behind these decisions.
And to make this abundantly clear, Tim, I am not drawing any conclusions here. I'm just not taking for granted what they said either.
So rather than taking a position that you would be forced to stand behind, you merely imply impure motives on their part, suggest it as a possibility without lending it any support yourself. . . aside from that you saw fit to bring it up not once, but twice. Yes, you are entirely without blame here.

Posted:3 months ago

#33

Paolo Giunti
Narrative Designer

36 73 2.0
Tim, are you familiar with the concept of "insufficient data to commit to a verdict"?
I don't have enough information to properly judge, therefore i'll refrain to do so.
I have doubts, however, and i don't see why i shouldn't express them.

Posted:3 months ago

#34

Tim Ogul
Illustrator

335 462 1.4
Tim, are you familiar with the concept of "insufficient data to commit to a verdict"?
I don't have enough information to properly judge, therefore i'll refrain to do so.
I have doubts, however, and i don't see why i shouldn't express them.
Benghazi.

Posted:3 months ago

#35

Rick Lopez
Illustrator, Graphic Designer

1,269 942 0.7
i highly doubt many woman were interested in playing FarCry4 from the get go and changing a co-op player to a female I dont think will change that or the gameplay. And for a single player game I doubt the Co-op aspect is that important. I myself dont play online much. I Dont blame UbiSoft for not putting too many resources there. multiplayer aspects of most games, unless its competitive multiplayer or MMO... usually fill out a niche hole in the game for the few that do care. i mean who plays Uncharted 2 or Ninja gaiden 3 multiplayer now a days? Even for new games like last of Us and tomb raider.

And 3 month delay on a game of this scale is a few extra million dollars they have to spend.

I also must add that as a first person shooter you really dont see the character... so I dont know what people are so fired up about.

Edited 2 times. Last edit by Rick Lopez on 13th June 2014 2:19am

Posted:3 months ago

#36

Tim Ogul
Illustrator

335 462 1.4
And let's also not forget that Ubi uses rolling development teams, so the team making Farcry would also be the team scheduled to make Farcry2017 or so? As soon as a team is done what they're doing on Farcry 4 they probably move to the next one. If the modeling and animation teams get stuck making female models work in the game, they are holding up the next game too. Meanwhile, most of the rest of the staff has nothing more to do. Who on the outside could say how disruptive that might be?

Posted:3 months ago

#37

Curt Sampson
Sofware Developer

596 360 0.6
@Morville:
Would anyone have cared? Okay, it would look a bit jarring...When half the industry doesn't care about 1080p/60fps and optimising for PC, discarding a woman as co-op character because the animations would've been janky is a bit much. (imo :) )
There's a reasonable artistic argument to be made that if the animations of one character would be quite poor in comparison to those of the rest of the game, you might want to leave that character out rather than compromise the experience. Even subtle things that are not explicitly noticed by players can still have an effect on their enjoyment of the game.

That said, I'd say that having the female character speak entirely in a male voice would be the deal-breaker here.

Given the fairly close release date of this game, I can understand the lack of a female character. The game design no doubt started long before the lack of female characters in games became such a big issue, and at this point they probably have had all of the mocap and voice acting in the can for quite a while, meaning that a change at this point would be considerably more expensive than if it had been designed in in the first place. (Not to mention the question of what design elements might break with the introduction of a female character.)

I think that the studio should at least be given credit for admitting that they made a mistake by not designing for this from the start, and committing to design for this in the future.

On a broader note, I would really like to see Ubisoft put a bit more work into the character development of their lead characters in general. I found the protagonist in Far Cry 3 rather jarring, actually: privileged suburban white boy turns in to mass killer with almost no emotional reaction to this aside from remaining whiny. To me, this was considerably less believable and more immersion-breaking than the protagonist from Far Cry 2, who at least had a more consistent and believable persona through the game.

Posted:3 months ago

#38

Morville O'Driscoll
Blogger & Critic

1,536 1,338 0.9
There's a reasonable artistic argument to be made that if the animations of one character would be quite poor in comparison to those of the rest of the game, you might want to leave that character out rather than compromise the experience. Even subtle things that are not explicitly noticed by players can still have an effect on their enjoyment of the game.

That said, I'd say that having the female character speak entirely in a male voice would be the deal-breaker here.
Yeah, I would agree, in a way. I've seen some very rough animations in Watch_Dogs, for example, but i don't care that much - no game is perfect - but a male-voiced woman? Then again, they could live with the poor animations and hire a voice actor and it would be an interesting compromise. :)

Posted:3 months ago

#39

Gary Riccio
Socio-Technical R&D

10 9 0.9
@D_IGR New studios without any baggage would love to part of the solution by having a vision and mission for games that has appeal across gender, race, ethnicity, religion, location, and socioeconomic privilege. Articles and authors like this will help us get on the right track. Thank you. The number of articles on this issue in the last few days, and the comments on this article clearly indicates that there is a gap in an industry that has much to offer the world. http://bit.ly/IGR_inclusion

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Gary Riccio on 13th June 2014 1:19pm

Posted:3 months ago

#40

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