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EA investigating virtual reality development

EA investigating virtual reality development

Mon 10 Mar 2014 9:12am GMT / 5:12am EDT / 2:12am PDT
Development

New CEO Andrew Wilson talks "modalities of play"

EA

New Electronic Arts CEO talked virtual reality on a recent panel, and suggested the company is currently considering its options when it comes to new devices like the Oculus Rift.

"The thing I challenge my team to right now is - 'Listen, there's clearly a desire to add a modality of play to the three we're currently focused on,'" he said at SXSW Gaming, as reported by Polygon.

"I don't know who the technology partner is that's going to deliver that modality for us, but let's start thinking now about the experiences [...] so that we can deliver experiences that make sense for you; experiences that deliver on the promise and the fantasy of being inside a video game."

Wilson suggested that understanding how players interact with games now is key to those future platforms, rather than focusing on the specifics of the hardware.

"When we think about making games today, we think less about the technology or the means of experiencing the game, and we think more about the modality of play," he said.

"When I look at any of the VR devices, I look at that not in terms of 'What is that device going to deliver,' but a desire for gamers to have a different type of modality - the 'Get In' type of modality, right. That might be delivered to you through a headset, or through some hologram that evolves out of your living room floor."

1 Comment

David Serrano
Freelancer

299 270 0.9
...let's start thinking now about the experiences [...] so that we can deliver experiences that make sense for you; experiences that deliver on the promise and the fantasy of being inside a video game.
And herein lies the irreconcilable conflict between what video game developers and publishers subjectively believe vs. what the majority of consumers actually desire.

Within the context of interactive VR experiences and consumer demand, what types of experiences will make the most sense? Experiences based on what the largest percentage of consumers will define and embrace as a form of play? Or experiences created to strictly adhere to the formal structure, systems, rules and core concepts of video games instead of what the majority of consumers define as play? The answer is VR play experiences, not VR video game experiences will make the most sense. Because to the average consumer (including the majority of players in the existing market), the concept of play is not inextricably linked to the structure, systems, rules or core concepts of any types of games. Because for every one form of play which involves combat, competition or conflict, there may be thousands of more prevalent forms of play which do not.

So if companies like EA focus on delivering the fantasy of being inside a video game, those future products will be just as unappealing to the average person as the games which currently define their markets.

Edited 2 times. Last edit by David Serrano on 10th March 2014 7:21pm

Posted:5 months ago

#1

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