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A word about commenting on GamesIndustry International

A word about commenting on GamesIndustry International

Wed 29 Jan 2014 4:11pm GMT / 11:11am EST / 8:11am PST

We're taking steps to ensure that our comments remains a thoughtful, respectful and engaging place for discussion among industry professionals

GamesIndustry International has been and will continue to be the source for game business news and discussion. But we're more than just a resource - we're a community. Our registered user base is filled with tens of thousands of industry professionals, and most are smart, opinionated and respectful of their peers.

But we've noticed in recent months that more unverified users have slipped through the cracks, so in the coming weeks we'll be taking steps to ameliorate the commenting environment. This will involve an analysis of our user database to ensure that everyone on the registered list is clearly a member of the games business - or studying to enter it. We're not changing the rules, we're simply enforcing them.

As a reminder, anyone can read our articles or comments made on our stories, but in order to join in the discussion, you must fall into one of three provable categories: 1) a working member of the games industry; 2) an individual with working history in the games business and still looking to be involved; or 3) a student currently studying game design (or related field) who is seeking to join the industry.

What this means is that in the near future, as we comb through the database, some registered members may lose commenting privileges. If this has been done in error, and we are wrong about a member's status, then by all means contact us at contact@gamesindustry.biz and we'll do our best to sort out the situation.

GamesIndustry International regularly sees participation from developers and executives at all levels, and when people in the industry share their thoughts in our comments section, they are doing so on the belief that they are engaging with others in the business they are in. It's our job to keep it that way.

Thanks for listening, and as always, we welcome your feedback.

132 Comments

Panagiotis Kouvelis Founder & CEO, Blueface Games

7 10 1.4
A very thoughtful move, kudos for thinking on a lower level and ensuring a healthy environment that we all can trust and share.

Posted:9 months ago

#1

Morville O'Driscoll Blogger & Critic

1,613 1,476 0.9
Fair fair... That does make sense. :) Though...
2) an individual with working history in the games business and still looking to be involved;
I am curious how the bolded part will be determined. I haven't published anything in a good long while (too busy trying to pay-down my debt with non-industry admin jobs :( ), but I am still looking to be involved. *shrugs*

Posted:9 months ago

#2

James Brightman Editor in Chief, GamesIndustry.biz

259 457 1.8
There will definitely be some borderline cases, but if an individual is no longer actively working in the industry and wants to be a commenter, then we'd simply ask to be pointed in the direction of their work history (publications, a linkedin page, etc)

Posted:9 months ago

#3

Adam Jordan Community Management/Moderation

119 70 0.6
Nice to hear that you are looking out for us ;)

Furthermore I am particularly pleased with number 2 on your list there as currently I am not actively working in the games industry but I sure as hell working my ass off to get back into it, which losing a portion of GIBiz, would hinder the experience; especially since the community part is the important part for me as explained under my name :P

Posted:9 months ago

#4

Mario Tommadich Technical Requirements & Compliance, Keywords International

32 28 0.9
It's a good idea. There are too many good websites already suffering from bad commenting.

Posted:9 months ago

#5

Jon Airhart Production Manager, Capcom

3 11 3.7
Popular Comment
This makes the lurkers among us happy as well.

Posted:9 months ago

#6
Popular Comment
Great move, too many articles always have comments from the same three people who have no real connection to our industry!

Posted:9 months ago

#7

Christopher Bowen Editor in Chief, Gaming Bus

459 738 1.6
I think there's a difference between someone who works in (or worked in; I'm the latter, in that I still write, but not professionally anymore) the industry and someone just looking to spew. We have heated discussions on these boards, but even those we disagree with, we know it's coming from a position of both knowledge, and interest; this is an industry we all care for, warts and all.

This is a good move.

Posted:9 months ago

#8

Patrick Frost QA Project Monitor

407 205 0.5
I'm ex-industry now so I'll guess I'll see you later. I will say that I think I'll miss old GamesIndustry.biz rather than the current one.

Just a quick note to say thanks for flagging Special Effect as an organisation. Very local to me and we will be raising some money for them shortly. I think it was Dan that wrote the article that first brought it to my attention.

Posted:9 months ago

#9

Gregory Hommel writer

91 53 0.6
Well gentlemen. Allow me to step up to the gallos first. I am no more connected to the games industry than the passion that I share and the dollars that I spend, which should actually put me fairly high on the "connection" list. I find this perplexing as the comments on these articles never get nasty or out of control. Mostly just taking the author to task over a slanted viewpoint or a personal agenda inserted into an otherwise unrelated story.

If the environment you seek is a place where you can say whatever you want, no matter how bent or inaccurate your article, without anyone offering a rebuttal or differing opinion then oust me first as I will never allow propaganda or personal agendas to slip by unnoticed.

There is no opinion more important than that of a passionate, intelligent, respectful consumer. I have never used inappropriate language or become belligerent in any comment. I have never posted a comment that was arbitrary or unrelated to the issue being discussed. I have never enjoyed the conversation more on any blog or thread I have contributed to.

In the absence of people like myself, I encourage and expect someone to involve themselves in these discussions so that no biased opinion or false information can flow freely and without resistance from these forums as it so often does. This site should not exist to mold and shape the narrative of the interactive entertainment industry. Only to report and discuss. Perhaps that is the rule that should be enforced, not changed.

Posted:9 months ago

#10
All well and good but what about all the poor fanboy flamer trolls? Where will they go now? no consideration for the real gamers! ;)

A few other considerations...
1) I appreciate your intentions but I think it should also be judged on merit of contribution not just 'are they tall enough to take the ride'. There will be many non-professionals who could provide valid comments. In fact, there are a few professionals (I'm thinking of a particular high profile 'analyst' / 'future predictor' ) who I have no interest in their opinion at all but they get a lot of exposure (on here).

2) I think you are doing a great job but every now and then it feels like some articles are written to accommodate non-professionals and entertain the people you are now looking to remove. I think the term is link-bait?

3) Xbone sucks. PS4 roolz! etc

Posted:9 months ago

#11
erm Gregory, sorry are you 'just' a consumer? can you please leave? thanks. ;)

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Benn Achilleas on 29th January 2014 6:01pm

Posted:9 months ago

#12

Morville O'Driscoll Blogger & Critic

1,613 1,476 0.9
I think there's a difference between someone who works in (or worked in; I'm the latter, in that I still write, but not professionally anymore) the industry and someone just looking to spew.
This is true. The issue I have is that some who work in the industry professionally (as indicated by their avatar/bio) have acted incredibly unprofessionally in the past. You only have to look at how Bruce Everiss (as an example) has been treated in the past to see how... thoughtless people can be. And I've had ad hominem remarks come at me here which I've never experienced on the pro-piracy forums I've hung out on.

All of which is to say that status within an industry is not the be-all-and-end-all.

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Morville O'Driscoll on 29th January 2014 6:34pm

Posted:9 months ago

#13

Nicholas Pantazis Senior Editor, VGChartz Ltd

1,020 1,467 1.4
Ultimately probably a good change. :)

Posted:9 months ago

#14

Todd Weidner Founder, Big Daddy Game Studio

420 1,000 2.4
The community here is a very cordial, mature and respectful one. Its an internet oasis of sorts

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Todd Weidner on 2nd February 2014 8:19pm

Posted:9 months ago

#15

Richard DeBarry Programmer

10 20 2.0
I don't comment much but to have that taken away just because I'm not considered industry isn't very fair. This is the only place I go where I feel I even have a voice and can learn about what goes on in the business.

I can get the same news elsewhere and also be able to talk about it so tell me what would be the point of staying?

So in conclusion you might as well just make the site private and invite only. What's the point of posting articles if only a certain group of people can even talk about it?

Posted:9 months ago

#16

Steve Wetz Reviewer/Assistant Editor, Gamer's Glance

213 529 2.5
If there's some sort of nastiness going on, I fail to see it. This site is more polite than the Victorian Era when considered against the rest of the Internet.

Having said that, I think there have been recent opinion pieces (the "Violent Video Games Debate is Dead/Alive" articles come to mind) where there was going to be a strong reaction and big differences in opinion. Some heated comments there should have been expected. Obviously your site, your rules, this isn't a democracy, etc. But it seems somewhat counterintuitive to attempt to limit what is "industry" and what isn't - something that sure seems like a transparent attempt at eliminating overly vocal commenters - when you publish articles which are virtually guaranteed to get strong reactions from anyone who reads them.

I hope I'm misinterpreting the situation though, and this is no more than your normal policing of the user database.

Posted:9 months ago

#17

Jim Webb Executive Editor/Community Director, E-mpire Ltd. Co.

2,284 2,493 1.1
"If I'm not back again this time tomorrow, carry on...carry on."

I hope I carry through to the next round with you but if not, it's been a pleasure, ladies and gentlemen. Yes, Bruce, even you.

Posted:9 months ago

#18

Darren Adams Managing Director, ChaosTrend

273 624 2.3
I don't agree with this and think it is a very ham fisted way of dealing with a very few idiots who personally I have never seen. From what I can tell most of the people that comment here are pretty well mannered and apart from the odd loud disagreement (which I think are essential to some threads to get perspectives from both sides) is very tame in comparison to other professional industry sites.

Surely your job as owners of a website is to moderate on a day to day basis, not black list certain individuals because they don't have direct links to the industry. This smells very much of the same shit that happened on the IGDA and was one of the reasons I stopped posting/visiting. Well that and the fact that Langdell was appointed a director, but that is another story.

Bad move if you ask me.

Edited 2 times. Last edit by Darren Adams on 29th January 2014 8:40pm

Posted:9 months ago

#19

Mbuso Radebe Associate Producer, Smoking Gun Interactive Inc.

55 23 0.4
@Jim I hope so too. I seldom comment, but I've usually found your input insightful and balanced.

Posted:9 months ago

#20

James Brightman Editor in Chief, GamesIndustry.biz

259 457 1.8
I think some of you are misunderstanding. We're not doing anything drastic here. GI has always been a site for the industry to participate in and we want to make sure that the people who are registered are who they say they are and that they belong. This isn't IGN, this isn't a site for consumers. It's for the people connected to the games business. So as I said in the post, we're simply looking to enforce the rules. It's not about "black listing" and it doesn't replace moderation either. Also, having a user base of people actually in the industry is valuable to us and we'll be looking to you for some participation in other things that will be announced soon.

Posted:9 months ago

#21

Morville O'Driscoll Blogger & Critic

1,613 1,476 0.9
Also, having a user base of people actually in the industry is valuable to us and we'll be looking to you for some participation in other things that will be announced soon.
...

That doesn't sound... good.

Posted:9 months ago

#22

Justin Shuard J - E translator

47 180 3.8
I still think it would be easier to just ban/suspend accounts when an insensitive comment crops up. As for me, some of my clients are game companies but seeing as I have no real way to prove it I guess my neck is on the chopping block. So long and thanks for all the fish it is then, I guess.

Posted:9 months ago

#23

Darren Adams Managing Director, ChaosTrend

273 624 2.3
@James

Don't get me wrong I get the intent behind "enforcing the rules", but I still think there is no need to do it. When has it ever been that bad here that we now have to stop people who aren't industry linked commenting on articles?

You may wonder why I am so against this seeing as I run a game development company and this wouldn't apply to me. But the point I am trying to make is that when I was trying to break into the industry, sites like this were a goldmine of information and let me litmus test ideas or express opinions. I was so appreciative of the discussions I could get into with real developers not being one myself at the time.

Look, I would be right behind you if it was like IGN in here, but I have never noticed anything get so bad as to warrant this 'enforcement'. Am I missing something?

Edited 2 times. Last edit by Darren Adams on 29th January 2014 10:05pm

Posted:9 months ago

#24

Christopher Bowen Editor in Chief, Gaming Bus

459 738 1.6
Popular Comment
James - the more I think about this, the less I like it.

The problem is that a lot of us either have worked, or are working, in the industry in some way, shape or form. Just because I no longer take a paycheque from the industry doesn't mean I'm any less knowledgeable about it than I was when I was reporting on it every day. And I feel that I, and others that might be affected, are largely positive contributors to the discussions.

I'm not comfortable with two things:

1) This indication that we always have to validate our industry's credentials. It feels like we're always renewing a membership, which is a little uncomfortable in an industry - both on the dev/pub side and on the media side - that has such high turnover.

2) What will be the dividing line be? I'm not sure I'm comfortable having someone from a site I've been a member of since well before it merged with your old stomping grounds (IG) determining my "street cred", so to speak.

Posted:9 months ago

#25

Morville O'Driscoll Blogger & Critic

1,613 1,476 0.9
@ Darren and Christopher

There's not much I can add to either of your comments, but I thought adding a Star to both was a weak way of showing how much I agree with you both. (Yes, useless comment maybe, but you both said what I've been trying to put into words for hours. :) )

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Morville O'Driscoll on 29th January 2014 10:14pm

Posted:9 months ago

#26

Morgan King Animator

48 92 1.9
I've really enjoyed the conversations I've had here, but I'd be the first to say that, as a freelancer, I'm a bit peripheral to the heart of the industry itself - these days I'm probably more in the film industry than the game industry (though there's a been a bit of Machinima overlap).

Posted:9 months ago

#27

Donald Dalley Freelance writer

52 38 0.7
When a forum / web site has a certain focus, sometimes the managers need to do a culling.

Posted:9 months ago

#28

Robin Clarke Producer, AppyNation Ltd

26 50 1.9
Popular Comment
This is a good start, but really you need to actively moderate comments as well. Comments that aren't relevant or don't add anything to the discussion should be pruned with extreme prejudice. You'll quickly see a much more diverse group of readers encouraged to participate as a result.

The main reason the commenting culture here is stuck in the shallow end isn't because people are explicitly breaking etiquette - it's because it's frankly tedious to have to wade through the same micro-community rehashing the same scripts over and over. You don't need to bark the same slogans in slightly different arrangements below a hundred different articles. You don't need twenty unspaced paragraphs to get to the point. You don't need to chip in to just say you agree/disagree or spit out a one-line generalisation about how everything's crap/great/better in the old days. Hit delete every time you see crap, and the offenders will soon be house trained.

I don't think 'having previously worked in the industry' should be a free pass either.

Conversely, there are a few writers with no professional links to the industry (afaik) whose opinions I value more than full-time analysts and consultants. (Bill Harris, Daniel Hughes and Ross Foubister spring to mind.)

Posted:9 months ago

#29

Paul Jace Merchandiser

945 1,433 1.5
As a merch who does third party work for various companies such as Gamestop, Sony, Microsoft, Activision and Disney I think I'm safe....for now. While I don't understand the full context of all the changes that will be implemented I think that removing the posting privileges of atleast some of the non-industry commenters is a good move. Nothing has gotten super out of hand yet but theres definitely been some serious trolling going on lately, something you'd expect from the non-industry sites. I also like Robin's idea of actively moderating the comments section.

Posted:9 months ago

#30

Sean Kauppinen Founder & CEO, IDEA

49 49 1.0
There are plenty of sites for consumers to comment on the industry (NeoGaf, Kotaku, IGN, etc.). GI is for the industry to discuss itself and news relevant to those within it. @James - you're doing the right thing enforcing the rules.

Posted:9 months ago

#31

Luke Kemp Editor, Critical Gamer

7 12 1.7
"This isn't IGN, this isn't a site for consumers. It's for the people connected to the games business."

So presumably only verified accounts will be able to access the site at all, to avoid unwanted pageviews from dirty plebs?

Posted:9 months ago

#32

Alfonso Sexto Lead Tester, Ubisoft Germany

837 671 0.8
Can't say I disagree with the idea of keeping this website from becoming a braindead-fanboy-wasteland like Gamespot's comment section is (still far from that,m nonetheless)

My question is where the line is going to be, particularly when it comes to independent press and bloggers. The opinion regarding if they are an actual part of the industry has been divided for years already.

Edited 2 times. Last edit by Alfonso Sexto on 30th January 2014 3:02pm

Posted:9 months ago

#33

Jakub Mikyska CEO, Grip Digital

208 1,126 5.4
A lot of discussions here get pretty intense, but that's part of the charm. I wouldn't even bother to comment if this site was full of people who agree with me. Instead I like having my opinions challenged. Sometimes, it seems like there are only a few people actively commenting regularly. I like diversity of comments and if they sometimes come from people who are only partly attached to the industry, so be it.

Posted:9 months ago

#34

Jason Schroder Senior Programmer, Io Interactive

19 38 2.0
Popular Comment
I often find the comments section more insightful than the article itself. Occasionally skimming articles entirely looking for any real meat before seeing what if anything interesting has been commented on. Many of the regular contributors from what I can gather are on the outskirts of the industry, without them though it would get rather dull around here ;)

And yes sometimes there's a bit of harmless dribble which could be curtailed, but overall I think GI would be shooting themselves in the foot if they decide to strictly enforce their rules.

Simply reminding your users what your expectations are for the comments section would probably suffice as the majority of visitors are professionals in one capacity or another. Warn/moderate/add a report button; there are other ways to keep this community humming constructively along.

Posted:9 months ago

#35

Rafa Ferrer Localisation Manager, Red Comet Media

65 125 1.9
@Jason - My thoughts exactly.
And yes, a Report button should do the trick to ensure everyone's comfortable around here.

Posted:9 months ago

#36

Lewis Brown Snr Sourcer/Recruiter, Electronic Arts

203 57 0.3
If a report button is added I can think of one member who is in trouble :-).

I would agree that its important for this site to retain the professional air that is missing in so many other consumer sites, but I would say it pretty much does apart from the odd headed discussion things remain very cordial.

Posted:9 months ago

#37

Shane Sweeney Academic

401 418 1.0
I'll pass especially with my recent work on the Stanley Parable... but I've been here maybe 8 years now?

I can't imagine how sad it would be if Jim Webb or other voices like him were culled.

Posted:9 months ago

#38

Daniel Hughes Studying PhD Literary Modernism, Bangor University

436 496 1.1
Well, I can't see me passing! I hope to do some kind of research into videogame narrative in the future (I always thought Mass Effect and the friction between the creative vision and EA's commercial vision would be fascinating to do), but that definitely doesn't allow me to qualify for continued commenting.

So thank you for allowing me to comment on, and interact with, the community for as long as I have done. I have a lot of respect for GI and particularly its robust, engaging and thoughtful community. Best wishes to you all in the future, I'll still be lurking somewhere on the sidelines and keeping an eye on the debates.

Posted:9 months ago

#39

Morville O'Driscoll Blogger & Critic

1,613 1,476 0.9
I always thought Mass Effect and the friction between the creative vision and EA's commercial vision would be fascinating to do
Ohhh, I'd definitely read that. :)

Posted:9 months ago

#40

Nick Parker Consultant

300 177 0.6
As long as Bruce is happy to receive our loving debate (abuse?) ;-)

Posted:9 months ago

#41

James Brightman Editor in Chief, GamesIndustry.biz

259 457 1.8
So a few things... 1) We are looking into adding a "report" button actually, and moderation is becoming a more active role for all GI staff. 2) @Alfonso, as for where we draw the line, we're making it pretty broad actually, so yes we include press (debate about whether press are a part of the industry notwithstanding). I had an educator in game design asking me if that qualifies - yes, game education definitely counts. 3) We're going to be using a bit of rule-bending for just a few select cases who have been a very active part of the community on this site for years and have acted professionally.

Edited 1 times. Last edit by James Brightman on 30th January 2014 3:31pm

Posted:9 months ago

#42

Justin Biddle Software Developer

163 493 3.0
I'm guessing I may well not survive the cut. Will be sorry to no longer be able to contribute but will still very much enjoy reading all your comments. Be nice if we're still able to star comments we like though. So, so long and thanks for all the fish :)

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Justin Biddle on 30th January 2014 3:31pm

Posted:9 months ago

#43

Jim Webb Executive Editor/Community Director, E-mpire Ltd. Co.

2,284 2,493 1.1
James, I trust the efforts put forth will be fair. I think many of us that have taken up residence here were initially worried they'd become excommunicated from what I perceive to be an equally important and interesting aspect of Gibiz: the community. But I believe you and others in charge are also aware of that and would not take such drastic action as to endanger that community.

I'm also incredibly curious about "we'll be looking to you for some participation in other things that will be announced soon." As you can imagine, I am intrigued with concepts of community engagement.

Posted:9 months ago

#44

Tom Keresztes Programmer

695 351 0.5
I am not too fond of censorship. But I could only register as an industry professional if i register with a company email address, which changes from time to time.

Posted:9 months ago

#45

Barrie Tingle Live Producer, Maxis

391 211 0.5
@Gregory

While I see your view point, however going by your own definition, anyone that plays games should be able to sign up to GamesIndustry and comment which would have the likely effect of taking this site into the often dismal realms of Eurogamer's comment threads. This site set out with targeting those of us involved in the industry or working their way towards it via study etc. Whether that is the right way to go isn't for us to decide but for the site owners.

There have been comments I have disagreed with from others within the Industry just as I'm sure people have disagreed with mine. I think valid dialogue on all sides will still occur after the change/enforcement and writers will still be pulled up on being biased if that comes across in their articles.

All I can say is, we'll have to wait and see who gets hit with the enforcement hammer.

Posted:9 months ago

#46

Steve Wetz Reviewer/Assistant Editor, Gamer's Glance

213 529 2.5
"yes we include press" - James

Glad to hear it. It would have been pretty ironic for a games-industry-centric press outlet to eliminate gaming press members from its ranks.

Posted:9 months ago

#47

Roland Austinat roland austinat media productions|consulting, IDG, Computec, Spiegel Online

138 81 0.6
I really enjoy the eclectic mix of comments here - and I hope you don't kill those insights with your new plan. Ofentimes the comments bring up new points and insights that the main story can barely touch.

Posted:9 months ago

#48

Tim Carter Designer - Writer - Producer

582 322 0.6
Maybe, GamesIIndustryInterational, you could tell us what game industry figurehead put pressure on you, and for what comments?

Posted:9 months ago

#49

Nicholas Lovell Founder, Gamesbrief

204 236 1.2
This is a marvellous idea. You should do it. I find myself in agreement with Robin (#30) which almost never happens.

The same old people rehashing the same old arguments is dull. People arguing when they are no longer connected with the game industry is dull (because the industry is ever evolving). Hurray for this move.

Posted:9 months ago

#50

Morville O'Driscoll Blogger & Critic

1,613 1,476 0.9
@ Nicholas

That presupposes that being within the industry automatically confers knowledge and reasoned debating skills. As an example of how that isn't quite correct, I dare say that there's many pirates who don't have an industry job but who do have a better grasp of the reasons and motivations for piracy than some within the industry. :)

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Morville O'Driscoll on 30th January 2014 7:43pm

Posted:9 months ago

#51

Nick Wofford Hobbyist

180 190 1.1
I probably won't make the cut. I will say that I love the community, but if GI doesn't want the traffic, I'll take it somewhere else.

See y'all around! :)

Posted:9 months ago

#52

Axel Cushing Writer / Blogger

107 132 1.2
I'd like to think I've kept myself to a reasonably high standard of behavior, but my "press" background as far as the games entirely web based, and a pretty small (though well established) site at that. It's enough to get me into E3 (generally), but I'm suddenly feeling very self-conscious and not just a little worried. I like the community here. I may not always agree with some of the comments or commentors, but I do like the conversations. If it happens, it happens, but I would rather it didn't happen.

Posted:9 months ago

#53

Keldon Alleyne Handheld Developer, Avasopht Ltd

455 443 1.0
What did I miss?

Posted:9 months ago

#54

Paul Jace Merchandiser

945 1,433 1.5
But we've noticed in recent months that more unverified users have slipped through the cracks, so in the coming weeks we'll be taking steps to ameliorate the commenting environment.
While alot of people are worried about being banned from commenting I think that the first to go will be the unverfied users. Theres been atleast three occassions in the year I've been here that I've seen users with no actual user name commenting on articles. And am I the only person who noticed that we had "Adolf Hitler" commenting on a story the other week? I suspect that those members will be the first to go.

Posted:9 months ago

#55

Tim Ogul Illustrator

335 466 1.4
Proper soundproofing is vital to any echo chamber. You don't want to let any white noise disrupt the harmonics.

Posted:9 months ago

#56

Rick Lopez Illustrator, Graphic Designer

1,269 941 0.7
You know, its fine that you want to keep the forums on a good note. The wierd thing is that I find these forums to be a pretty good place compared to most gaming sites. Comments here are usually constructive and in tune to what is going on in the industry and for the most part I find the people who comment here to be pretty good people and level headed. It would suck to get rid of any of the "regulars" the people who have posted a considerable amount of time and havent gone out of line. If your going to impose these new rules, do it for the new people and for the ones who have been here a long time, simply be straight with certain rules, no disrespectful comments, no trolling and no commenting off topic.

There are a few regulars here that will be missed if they get axed, and these forums are very good because of the users who helped shape it. And defining what it is to work in the video games industry is pretty relevant, especially with how unstable it is. I mean indie developers often create games from there bedroom, garage or basement and the only thing that drives them is not an extensive resume or a huge portfolio, but a strong passion for games and the game industry. So what now? You have to have 5 years working in the industry and has to at least have work on at least 3 published tirles, or if your indie created a game.

One thing I know about the game industry is that its HARD, its hard to get into, what about those people who are seriouse about being in the game industry and got turned down or were down on there luck. Lets give them the axe because they were not good enough and have only elite members. I mean what defines a game developer.

I just thing that if a persons comments are not productive, bring nothing to the table and add nothing to the forums in a repetitive continuos its fine to give them the axe. But not everyone has the same luck working in the industry. And the industry is made up of people with different skills, what defines a game developer if all the person does is record voce overs or does just character designs or textures in photoshop? I think skilled and educated people should also have the right to comment on these forums. And what about those people who got hired and then got layed off in 6 months and never really had time to do anything cause the company had some bad financial mishap? They get to be on these forums? Does that make them a profesional?

I mean Im already familiar with a few users, users that I actually enjoy reading posts from, like Jim Webb, Greg Wilcox, Dr. Chee something, Morville O'Driscoll, Andread gervais(something like that)... hell... I even enjoy reading Bruces comments as outlandish as they are sometimes and even if I disagree with most of what he says ( except maybe one time, ok maybe twice), I actually enjoy reading his comments.

i belive what makes these forums a great place is that you often get so many differant perspectives coming together. And I think that though not everyone may have had a huge role in the games biz, there is a fair amount of people that is very passionate about it. At times they may be a bit off on what they are saying, but in many cases an industry proffesional will step up to share their knowlage.

I mean you can put a flag button, however that can be abused by someone who simply disagrees with the comments. So i just think as long as users dont disrespect one another, dont troll and keep there comments constructive and relevant to the topic, I think it should be ok to let them stay, even if there proffesion in the game industry is "Blogger".

I know alot of my posts are long, I try to make em short. I hope I dont get the axe for that, as I dont recall disrespecting anyone. The only TWO people Ive seen being disrespectful here are actually Industry profesionals, as far as what they claim and I can mention their names and to whom there comments were directed to.

I dont think people should be penalized by being honest about what they think and I find these forums to be very good when it comes to how far people can express that. Most of the time its in good spirits.

TO END THIS: I agree there should not be tolerance for disrespectful people, trolls or people who dont give constructive comments or open up constructive debates. And two features id like to see is the ability to send private messages to users and the ability to comment directly on someones post and a better profile section allowing people to show there work and added details.

Edited 4 times. Last edit by Rick Lopez on 31st January 2014 4:35am

Posted:9 months ago

#57

Greg Wilcox Creator, Destroy All Fanboys!

2,195 1,169 0.5
I'm not dead (or banned, hopefully) Rick. Just getting some stuff done on the site and storing up energy for what's turning into a busy Toy Fair next month (my poor inbox is about to blow up in my face with a few thousand emails to pore over)...

Posted:9 months ago

#58

Brook Davidson Artist / 3D design

84 225 2.7
I never seen this sites comments as being bad in anyway, shape, or form. Actually, it's pretty funny cause I just assumed everyone here was an industry professional. Didn't even know you all got lenient.

However, as some have clearly pointed out, what is an industry professional? Where is the line drawn? What about Youtubers who have gaming channels? What about those who have been part of the industry in the past? Just because they no longer work directly in the industry doesn't mean they lost all their knowledge of the industry. What about those who have an interest in it and want to be part of the industry in the future but are yet in college or have yet to gain work experience? What about those who mod games?

Personally, I am a youtuber with a gaming channel. A 3D game modeler, level designer, and have gone to college for game art. I have done many other things related to the industry as well. Also have been planning on getting back into making mods, specifically for Skyrim and Kerbal Space Program.

The question I have, is that enough? I don't currently "work" in the industry but I certainly do take part in it. I also plan to continue to be part of it and hopefully will find more work as well. Also, would you consider youtube as work?

Things in this industry have changed. The line is currently blurred greatly on who you can consider a professional.

Posted:9 months ago

#59

Morville O'Driscoll Blogger & Critic

1,613 1,476 0.9
However, as some have clearly pointed out, what is an industry professional? Where is the line drawn?
Obviously, the criteria don't have to be released, but I am certainly curious...

The site I mostly contributed to is no longer operating. I plan on posting articles on my Tumblr and on a friend's gaming website. Would that count as "industry professional"?

Interestingly (at least, to me :) ), if you went back 20 years, industry professional would mean something different than it does now. Equally, though, go back 30 years and it would mean something closer to what it is now, with the (somewhat amateur) formation of Crash and CVG, and bedroom coders.

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Morville O'Driscoll on 31st January 2014 6:37am

Posted:9 months ago

#60

James Prendergast Research Chemist

736 434 0.6
I would be sad to have to leave the site - as people have said, it's GI's to do with as they wish. However, I do see harm to the community with the potential of having a one-sided echo chamber of confirmation bias on all issues. Sure, this isn't a consumer site, but the consumer does make an important part of the games industry (i.e. they make it exist). Like Morville mentioned up thread, just because you have a position, doesn't make you knowledgeable and or intelligent. Having feedback from different sections of the industry (yes, that includes the people you're selling ideas and products to) is very important and you won't get that or those sorts of discussions on sites like Eurogamer or IGN et al. because that's not their remit... it is Game Industry's though.

Posted:9 months ago

#61

Yiannis Koumoutzelis Founder & Creative Director, Neriad Games

363 208 0.6
"I find these forums to be a pretty good place compared to most gaming sites"

This is not a gaming site. This is a professional site for game developers.

I fully agree with this move. GI had recently started becoming more like a consumer site, and apart from reducing commenting I have also reduced my visits for that very reason. Too many people barely relevant to the reality of game business today commenting. The sad thing is their comments had some times been taken as "professional concerns" and have even been used by external sources to "prove" a point.

Looking forward to a new, more professional, and less opinionated GI. Please stick to reporting news. Opinions can be offered in the comments.

Thank you.

Posted:9 months ago

#62

Morville O'Driscoll Blogger & Critic

1,613 1,476 0.9
Further to James's and Yiannis's comments...

It's fairly obvious that commenters here have their own biases. That's to be expected, from anyone passionate about their industry. It's also fairly obvious that the industry, generally speaking, lacks awareness in some areas - booth babes, sexism, price-points for games, sexual harassment, piracy, second-hand sales, genres-that-sell, crunch, etc..

I would not expect this site to have the same awareness of the issues mentioned above as we - the community as it has been up to now - have had here in the past.

I hope I'll be proven wrong, though. I really do.

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Morville O'Driscoll on 31st January 2014 10:27am

Posted:9 months ago

#63

Adam Jordan Community Management/Moderation

119 70 0.6
I'm not sure why some people are getting uppity about this. GBiz have already stated that if you have games industry experience and can prove it (For example I have worked for EA and it is proven) then you are fine to be here.

The issue is essentially those without gaming industry experience or those that aren't working towards a career within the industry. As it has been stated GBiz is a place for game developers and industry workers alike. Not "another" gaming site.

As to losing vocal, opinionated members or having one-sided arguments...if you are even remotely stating that here then you haven't bothered to either a) read people's comments or b) not been here very long.

GBiz members are probably the most vocal members I have ever seen upon a website that can actually write without insults or resorting to childish remarks and actions. Arguments and discussions are NEVER one sided (Look through these very comments and you will see that)

But at the end of the day, GBiz have one type of audience they have in mind, just like the majority of sites and companies and it's that focus on the one type of audience that defines them from other gaming news...after all, their articles are freely available to everyone, it's just they are focusing the comments to be more towards actual games industry employees. That's all, nothing fancy or devastating

Posted:9 months ago

#64
It's also fairly obvious that the industry, generally speaking, lacks awareness in some areas - booth babes, sexism, price-points for games, sexual harassment, piracy, second-hand sales, genres-that-sell, crunch, etc..
This is the kind of insulting, consumer biased commenting I would rather see banished to gaming sites.

Posted:9 months ago

#65

Morville O'Driscoll Blogger & Critic

1,613 1,476 0.9
Mmhhmmm

No offense was meant, but you only have to look at Dickwolves, the fallout over EA Spouse, Brendan McNamara's attitudes over crunch and a recent story about a journo being sexually inappropriate to a female professional on Facebook to see what I meant.

Also, note that I said "lacks awareness in", not "is filled with". If you cannot see the truth in that statement...

Edited 2 times. Last edit by Morville O'Driscoll on 31st January 2014 10:40am

Posted:9 months ago

#66

Kingman Cheng Illustrator and Animator

956 184 0.2
Hmm that's a bit of a shame, I'm a freelancer and I've always wanted to work in games industry, but I'm not a student so it means I don't quite fall into any of the categories sadly.

So I guess that's the end of my commenting days, it was really good speaking to loads of great people on here. As mentioned before the comments in the articles are often sometimes more insightful than the actual article itself.

It was great to speak to loads of great people here, especially Morville, Chee, Fran and many others! Maybe sometime in future I'll be able to return to commenting. Good luck to all developers and games folk in here, keep the industry alive! :)

Posted:9 months ago

#67

Morville O'Driscoll Blogger & Critic

1,613 1,476 0.9
Aye, I don't think I'll fall into any of the catagories either, and since this is turning into a "So long and thanks for all the fish" thread...

It's been a definite pleasure to comment here, with some genuinely interesting conversations from all parts of the industry. There's people who have changed my views on why companies and people have done what they've done, and said what they've said, and I hope that I've at least raised some thought-provoking issues every now and then. There's also some here who I'll genuinely miss conversing with, but I hope paths will cross in the future. :) (Which reminds me @ Greg Wilcox: I still haven't got around to reading that article about pinball. :( )

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Morville O'Driscoll on 31st January 2014 1:01pm

Posted:9 months ago

#68

Darren Adams Managing Director, ChaosTrend

273 624 2.3
Well I don't want to reiterate what I have said already, you should know my stance and reasoning. But reading the comments after mine I can see how close minded and protective some people here are of their precious 'game industry' status and disdain of anyone who isn't "in the club".

Its embarrassing, really embarrassing.

Posted:9 months ago

#69

Adam Jordan Community Management/Moderation

119 70 0.6
@Morville: The games industry as a whole lacks awareness but I wouldn't say the developers on here do. However I don't think having a "consumer" voice would change any part of the awareness factor of any of the examples you gave.

Now if your examples were more towards the future of gaming, Free to Play, Prices, Value for Money and so on and so forth then I would entirely agree with you.

Me, I personally look at both sides and sit on the fence before adding my 2 cents, purely because that's what happens within debates and executing opinions. But the fact that generalising is being thrown out here just because some of us are developers is kind of one of the reasons why I feel this is a good move for GBiz.

Also it's not just the games industry that "lack awareness"...turning the tables, so do consumers. In fact I was watching an all girl Counter Strike team streaming the finals of a tournament. The twitch chat was full of moronic comments like "Oh my god, you have a PC in your kitchen!" and "Screw the game, put webcam on and show us your breasts!"

My point is, while the silly marketing of the games industry doesn't help the situation, neither do the gamers themselves and to bring us back to full circle, I don't understand how or why voice(s) from the consumer's point of view would change much within these comment sections.

However, turning the tables once again, I feel that all developers should at least play their own games and understand what it's like to be a consumer of their game. It's something so simple yet constantly disregarded. Obviously if that happened then there would be a Dev/Consumer voice...such as my own since I am not only someone that has worked in and still wanting to work in the games industry but I am also a gamer and actually talk with gamers upon a daily basis.

Going back to GBiz changing things around. The only issue I see with the move is the fact those like Kingman Cheng and others wanting to get into the gaming industry will suffer because they don't fit into the category (I would assume those retired or not working within the industry any more will still be able to comment since the stipulation is "Having worked in the industry and able to prove it") but those that want to get into the industry have nothing, which as someone who is still seeking for their next position within the games industry, it's something I sympathize with.

Posted:9 months ago

#70

Morville O'Driscoll Blogger & Critic

1,613 1,476 0.9
@ Adam

Funny you should say a lot of that... The original "draft" of that post began "Whilst I wouldn't want this site to turn into a fully open consumer site..." :)

I agree that consumers lack awareness, about so many aspects of the industry, and that they can be stupid arses, but I also wholeheartedly agree that there should be a Dev/Consumer voice. If my commenting privileges are revoked it'll pain me to come here and read comments that ignore that aspect of the industry, unable to argue (if I wished to) that "no, the consumer pays your bills!" But c'est la vie.
Now if your examples were more towards the future of gaming, Free to Play, Prices, Value for Money and so on and so forth then I would entirely agree with you.
2 things here. 1) I was composing that post on a phone in a coffee shop, so it wasn't as long as it could be, and 2) any more examples would've felt like I was kicking the industry whilst it was down. That said, I feel "price-points for games" covers all your examples above. :)
The only issue I see with the move is the fact those like Kingman Cheng and others wanting to get into the gaming industry will suffer because they don't fit into the category [...] those that want to get into the industry have nothing, which as someone who is still seeking for their next position within the games industry, it's something I sympathize with.
Yeah, considering my past work has disappeared into the ether, and I'm back to going "Woo!Tumblr!", having commenting privileges removed is pretty damaging. In that sense, this is less a news website, and more a networking tool for people in and on-the-outskirts of the industry.

Edit:

Noticing Rick's edit below me, I, too shall throw my email out there: m_odriscoll[at]yahoo.co.uk. And feel free to add me on Steam (Pixieking) or Twitter (Pixiemorv). :)

Edited 4 times. Last edit by Morville O'Driscoll on 31st January 2014 2:43pm

Posted:9 months ago

#71

Rick Lopez Illustrator, Graphic Designer

1,269 941 0.7
@... Jim Webb, Greg Wilcox, Dr. Chee something, Morville O'Driscoll, Andread gervais(something like that), Bruce (the mobile device guy), Jade Law... If I get axed, it was nice knowing you... Anyway im posting my email for you guys and anyone who liked reading my posts or thought I was a pretty cool guy.... rickboy79@yahoo.com or djrickboy@gmail.com... just let me know your name from the forums and that we met here. Im also on PSN and Nintendo network with the same gamer tag.... "Fairbourne"
------------------------------

I find this as a move to silence those whos comments challenges or disagree with current industry trends. I bet lots of people working for big companies see what happens here and are not to happy and now games industry. biz is feeling the heat.... I hope Im wrong. As these forums are reltively pleasant and I really dont find many cases of disrespect, trolling or unconstructive comments.

I find myself in the same boat as Kingmen Cheng (comment#70), I do have a steady job. But I also do freelance work and Ive always wanted to work in the video game industry and at least in my case studied Graphic design with that purpose in mind. Im also an illustrator with a strength for charater design, I have an education and a masters degree, gave class to students from 18 to adult. I was a professor teaching, Photoshop, Illustrator, After Effects and advertising. I find myself learning Maya and Zbrush now. Because the industry is ever changing and new technologies emerge, so I gotta keep up. So what now, i need to get a job at game stop to be in the games industry, blogger, youtubber to stay here? What about the merch at Gamestop who is surrounded by games everyday, were does he fit? But like wise those people engaged in blogs, Vlogs, youtube channles, should they go as well???? This is soooo messed up.

Im in the process of applying for enrollement in GNOMON and the Academy of Art University of San Francisco. Im not in the industry but have very close ties with people that do. Ive been activily up to date with industry news for over 20 years. If there is a merger, a company going bust, employee's getting laid off an industry proffesional retiring or new technologies emerging, I probably know about it before most people do. As with such emerging technologies like the use of Memristors, Super Capacitors, Graphine, Holographic Veristile Disks, Im very well informed. I knew about the Nintendo motion controller before it even came out and the second screen WiiU gamepad and solid state data storage. I take all the bits of news, rumors and peaces of information I dig up from variouse sources and piece them together and I can get a pretty clear picture of things to come. And its the reason I joined these forums. Its the reason i like being here and commenting. And for the most part I like that i can get a thought through without being trolled, cursed at or have some biased XBOX or SONY fanboy making shallow statements.

Conversations are usually very engaging and provide much insight to the inner workings of the game industry and that is why Im here. I dont really bother with any other forums. I come here because I actually love being here. But if you give me the axe go ahead, if you have a problem with long comments than limit them like Twitter does. But that would lead to incomplete statements.

I dont agree with that nore with the statements of Robin @ comment #30 or Nicholas Lovell. And I will explain and your welcome to challenge my statements if I sound outlandish or wrong...
The same old people rehashing the same old arguments is dull. People arguing when they are no longer connected with the game industry is dull (because the industry is ever evolving). Hurray for this move.
If gamesindustry . biz agrees with that statement than people like Bruce who have been here for a while and comments regularly should have got to go? Simply because he belives in his statements and speaks with the conviction that its true, even though others dont agree. Or what about those people that have lost there jobs? They should go too? Right... they are no longer tied to the games industry, ironic since half the articles here is about people losing there jobs. What about those indie developers who work from there bedroom or garage. They are not considered industry unless they release a game????

Its nice that people should get straight to the point, however everyone expresses themselves differently. I tend to be very critical of my thoughts because I got that drive and am very passionate about the game industry and all of its aspects. So I often have trouble getting my thoughts though in few words. But if you knew me in real life, thats part of my charm and why people like talking to me. I hardly find my statements to be shallow.

If I wanted to comment on Video games or make fanboy biased statements favoring one platform I would go to IGN. This is the ONLY forum I spend time engaging in productive and constructive industry related articles and I like engaging with industry profesionals simply because I strive to be in there shoes and make games one day.

Just because my field of study was not a game design specific course, the game industry employs, Graphic Designers, Sound Engineers, Animators and 3D artists. So I really thought It was appropriate for me to be here, because I consider myself to be a profesional. While Im not actively employed in a game industry position I DO HAVE SKILLS WHICH ARE RELEVANT. I mean Keiji Inafune started out as a Graphic artist at Capcom and lots of well known video game proffesionals are reknowned for their illustration work such as Akiman.

So what is your definition of someone studying video game design and game industry profesional? When the video game industry is made up of people with variouse skills working together.

Anyway I hope the changes are fair and critical, and not met with an Iron fist. It would be nice if you sent an email to people, trying to work things out with them and maybe allow them to remain on the forums, I know I would like that.

Edited 7 times. Last edit by Rick Lopez on 31st January 2014 2:18pm

Posted:9 months ago

#72

Kingman Cheng Illustrator and Animator

956 184 0.2
I agree with you there Rick on every point. I do think the specifications outlined are a little rigid, especially considering examples like Bruce who just adds the same opinion to every discussion. There are lots of contributors around here who don't work in the games industry as defined in this article but so often I feel they/we all bring up very valid and good points with regards to the discussions.

The reason I joined and registered here in the first place years ago is to not only keep up with the industry's latest news, but also to join the discussion myself as I am one of the many 'non-professionals' here who have been following the games industry for an awful long time.

But anyway I also hope the changes are fair too. To anyone else who is in the same situation as me and Rick, good luck breaking into the industry, hope to see you all in the same studio one day. :)

P.S. whilst I'm here, extra shout out to Greg Wilcox, Alfonso Sexto and Jim Webb, always enjoyed reading your opinions!

Posted:9 months ago

#73

Jim Webb Executive Editor/Community Director, E-mpire Ltd. Co.

2,284 2,493 1.1
To the Community:
Thanks to those that have mentioned me by name as being a respected member. I appreciate the sentiment and hold the same to each of you. You don't find this level of professional and mannerly interaction in this industry anywhere else on the web. It would be shame to no longer be able to participate in it with all of you.

To GIbiz:
Like many have noted, the community here has become as important as the content published. That's a rarity for a comments section. An established forum can reach such esteemed levels but a simple comments section usually doesn't have the cohesion of users combined with the quality of comments to reach that level. Remember that. You don't have a comments section...you have a community. I trust you'll take that into account when applying, or enforcing, the rules.

And since it seems we're listing our CV's ahead of time to help ensure we qualify enough to maintain our existence here, I'll list mine.
EIC and Community Director for a long standing video game network (12 years). I'm also a student studying Networking Technology to be applied toward cloud gaming and services infrastructure.

Posted:9 months ago

#74

David Spender Lead Programmer

129 54 0.4
I've been here for years - very occasionally commenting. I sometimes freelance but do not always work full-time in the game industry. I appreciate being part of the community. I agree that comments aren't up to their previously high standards as when I first joined, hope things can be worked out in a way that doesn't throw the baby out with the bathwater so to speak.

Posted:9 months ago

#75

Kyle Rowley Senior Gameplay Designer, Remedy Entertainment

26 17 0.7
I imagine the number of comments on any given article will be reduced with any kind of culling. Unfortunately, while there are a significant number of users signed up who actively work at a publisher / developer, there participation in discussing industry related matters is hampered by the transparency required in order to post here :).

My views are not necessarily the views of the company I worked for at the time of posting, so fear of misrepresenting the company come before my desire to share opinions and debate. Having the ability to hide my name and the company I work for would probably help in that regard - but AFAIK I'm unable to do that?

Posted:9 months ago

#76

Daniel Garcia QA Tester, Crytek

4 2 0.5
I don't get it why this site is making this move. It's one of the very few websites that is free of fanboy posts/trolling.

Until it isn't so I wouldn't start to enforce and check the users.

Posted:9 months ago

#77

Nick Ferguson Senior Producer, Microsoft

49 11 0.2
Please also consider a shorter cap on comment lengths.

The saying "I didn't have time to write a short letter, so I wrote you a long one" often springs into mind on GI.biz threads.

Posted:9 months ago

#78

Craig Page Programmer

386 220 0.6
I don't see anything good coming from this, you're trying to solve a problem that doesn't exist.

If you don't believe me that you have the best commenters in the history of the internet, then spend 10 minutes going through comments on youtube videos or from any newspaper.

I enjoy the comments here because they usually provide the rest of the story, the stuff that wasn't included in the press release, and they point out things that the writer was either unaware of or unable to say.

Posted:9 months ago

#79

Rick Lopez Illustrator, Graphic Designer

1,269 941 0.7
@Nick Ferguson

...OR....long comments can collapse as done in IGN, Yahoo and Facebook. And each comment can present the first 3000 characters allowing people to preview the post and to view the rest if they wish to do so, with a "show more" button. This will provide a much cleaner visuals for the forum and keep members from needing to scroll down so much. Nothing gained by putting a handicap on peoples ability to express themselves.

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Rick Lopez on 31st January 2014 4:20pm

Posted:9 months ago

#80
As has already been alluded too; which executive complained about what comment?

Seriously, with any change in editorial oversight, a more critical eye to the "voices off message" will be paid. Also as we are talking about multi-billion operations, any non scripted voices will be shunned, or attacked.

As one that sits so far on the fence regarding acceptability that I can taste the splinters, I would just like to say in what may be my last post, it was a pleasure to read Bruce's rants, and to make some good cyber-friends and I wish you all well - in serious times of change for this industry.

Posted:9 months ago

#81

Spencer Franklin Concept Artist

100 140 1.4
@Nicholas Lovell
"The same old people rehashing the same old arguments is dull. People arguing when they are no longer connected with the game industry is dull (because the industry is ever evolving). Hurray for this move."

This would seem to be predicated on the fact that those "same old people rehashing the same old arguments..", are in fact non industry and that culling them would somehow reinvigorate the comments section with new, fresh thoughts and perspectives...
wrong. It just means that you will still have those "same old people rehashing the same old arguments..", just fewer of them perhaps. this is really the only site I post to, when i do post, and it was because of the quality of the insights I often get when reading... whatever sparked this sudden need to enforce a rule that has been very lax for some time, must have been major
.
Also, just because someone is not currently active int he industry after spending X amount of time in it, doesn't suddenly invalidate their thoughts and opinions, much less their personal experience and knowledge on the subject, which is what I infer from your last line. In the end, industry "pros" can argue their side till blue in the face, it's the consumer that ultimately decides. I find it a bit sad that (except for the chosen few) the intelligent consumer opinion will be squashed.. even though I'd say they are just as much a part of "industry" as any journalist who simply reports on industry happenings.

I'll just seek professional insight somewhere a bit less restrictive, if I should have to go elsewhere after this "culling". I thought I had joined a community, but it's looking like GI and certain others simply want it to be a comments section for the currently anointed. Best of luck to GI.Biz in any case.

Edited 2 times. Last edit by Spencer Franklin on 31st January 2014 6:27pm

Posted:9 months ago

#82

Al Nelson Producer, Tripwire Interactive

36 61 1.7
There are other sites and forums I go to, to interact with players.
One of the unique features of this site, IMO, is the industry-heavy demographic and business focus.

Posted:9 months ago

#83

Yiannis Koumoutzelis Founder & Creative Director, Neriad Games

363 208 0.6
Indeed there are so many other communities and forums we can discuss and exchange opinions with gamers. Most of us already do and very often too! Even undercover without mentioning we are developers so we get an honest response.

I can't think of a developer who respects himself who doesn't! I think those who don't are missing on a lot, and lose touch with what people like and play out there! It is an insult to imply that we don't, it is an insult to draw parallels with some sort of "ethnical cleansing" after this announcement. It is wrong to believe that an "echo chamber" is in the making. We all have so diverse opinions and points of view based on our experience with development over the years. If that notion was true, that would mean that industry forums and events like GDC are huge echo chambers?

It is true that many non industry commenters have been a pleasure to read. I would very much like to know where they frequent so I continue reading their educated opinion.

Posted:9 months ago

#84

Morville O'Driscoll Blogger & Critic

1,613 1,476 0.9
I would very much like to know where they frequent so I continue reading their educated opinion.
Mmmm... Whilst there's a couple of developers over on the pro-piracy board I hang out on, I seriously doubt that many people here could stomach the attitude that a lot of the regulars there exhibit, just to read the more intelligent posts (from myself and a few others). And that place and here are, actually, my only two regular hangouts.

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Morville O'Driscoll on 1st February 2014 8:34am

Posted:9 months ago

#85

Rafa Ferrer Localisation Manager, Red Comet Media

65 125 1.9
Like Jim said:
Remember that. You don't have a comments section...you have a community. I trust you'll take that into account when applying, or enforcing, the rules.
That pretty much sums it up.

I don't know, I may make the cut since my company has been working on a fair amount of games as a localisation provider for quite a few years now, but this site wouldn't feel the same without many of you folks. I don't comment a lot, sometimes because I get beaten to it and I try not to spam with redundant comments, and sometimes because I find myself on the receiving end of the knowledge exchange that goes on every day around here. Funny thing is, I'm pretty sure I've gained a lot of insight from people who wouldn't make this cut.

Anyway, you people are my morning coffee and I really enjoy reading you every day. I hope GI.biz will keep it that way.

Posted:9 months ago

#86

Darren Adams Managing Director, ChaosTrend

273 624 2.3
Well, to sum up then;

- This suggested action is not well received by most here.

- The general feeling here is that there is no problem that needs fixing.

- It looks and feels like external pressure has something to do with this move.

- I (and others) would be sad if some of the more fringe elements were removed.

- There are many alternatives that could be used to fix "the problems" and still keep the majority of great people here that aren't directly linked to the industry.

- This is a decision that GI.biz have to really weigh up what is most important. The current community or ticking some boxes for whatever reason.


Remember this is a choice, not a necessity.

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Darren Adams on 1st February 2014 10:49am

Posted:9 months ago

#87
- It looks and feels like external pressure has something to do with this move.
I think it would be useful for the new editorial direction at GI.biz to confirm that they have, or have not, received external pressure form certain corporations and its executive teams to "censure" the comments made. And as-wage concerns that million dollar corporations do not want to see their announcements "critiqued" by "ill informed trolls" on this webside.

We have to remember that MCV had also come under extreme pressure to delete and suspend discussion to particular news stories - recently seen with the suspension of comments to Microsoft and EA news reports. And MCV news site has paid a high price in lost readership and a moral backlash for this undertaking.

The ball is back with the new editorial team at GI.biz to confirm or disprove there has been external pressure.

Posted:9 months ago

#88

Jim Webb Executive Editor/Community Director, E-mpire Ltd. Co.

2,284 2,493 1.1
For those that wish to remain in contact, make sure your email address is updated in your user accounts. Click the gear icon near your username at the top of the page then click the email tab.
For those looking for a place to regularly communicate on the industry if you are removed from this community, please see my user account. We'll gladly take you; anonymously or not. Though hopefully it never has to come to that for any of you.

Posted:9 months ago

#89

Gareth Eckley Commercial Analyst

88 68 0.8
I've probably made one scathing remark too many and spoilt things for everyone. Sorry.

@ Andrea - The capacity to hide remarks not made by people with a currently verified industry email address seems a good idea for everyone, except possibly small developers who may have to jump through more hoops to be recognised as "legitimate". That drawback aside, it seems like the best compromise (assuming the motivation is to improve the signal to noise ratio).

If the pressure to do this is external. then just don't allow non-authorised posters to post at all. That should ensure that anyone who doesn't play ball can be blacklisted.

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Gareth Eckley on 1st February 2014 10:42pm

Posted:9 months ago

#90
@Andrea, interesting speculation - and like wise my speculation would be that in trying to redress the business model with a new editorial lead pressure has been applied, kinda like "..hey if you want our advertising support of your business model you will have to stop all those guys slagging off our press announcements!!"

Posted:9 months ago

#91

James Prendergast Research Chemist

736 434 0.6
@ Andrea Pipparolo, Kevin Williams,

That was my thought as well in a blog post I had about the issue. However, according to James Grant, who I previously had a bit of contact with when we were going through the unannounced re-verification process late last year after writing my blog post:

"As for the old registration wall, our readership was very strong during that period and was demonstrably games industry centric. This was a positive period and a strategy that really helped establish the core community and tone of the site.

As we grew, we wanted to share our content more socially and organically, so moving to a more open, but moderated, model has been a great balanced way to retain informed and accountable debate, without the suffering from the walled garden / echo chamber effect you are rightly cautious of from too heavy-handed control.
"

Posted:9 months ago

#92

Bruce Everiss Marketing Consultant

1,692 594 0.4
To me there seem to be two problems.

1) Uneducated people who think that making an ad hominem attack against someone with whom they disagree is acceptable.
People who have historically done this here tend to be just as much industry professionals as not. So the new rules won't help much.

2) Irrational excessive brand allegiance. Fanboyism. People who attack Microsoft because they have a huge emotional investment in Sony. So we get abusive schoolboy level rants. These are very common on the consumer websites and are mostly brought here by non industry professionals.

The answer, of course, is a report button. And someone on the editorial side with good judgement to maintain the quality of the discussion.

Posted:9 months ago

#93

Darren Adams Managing Director, ChaosTrend

273 624 2.3
One of these rare occasions where I agree with Bruce on point 1, especially the second paragraph.

Though I have to laugh at the irony of point 2 Bruce. :D

Edited 2 times. Last edit by Darren Adams on 2nd February 2014 11:16am

Posted:9 months ago

#94

Klaus Preisinger Freelance Writing

1,162 1,232 1.1
Personal attacks -> Delete
Heated argument driven discussions -> Allow
Personal Fanboyism -> Respect
Perspectives -> Accept their existence

There is nothing wrong with being a fan of something, or defending a concept/product/company because you believe in it. There are always two sides to a coin which can be argued about in such a way that it turns into an interesting and valuable community interaction. Nobody needs to be attacked on a personal level to validate his own opinion, or invalidate an argument brought forth by another person.

This community comments on games and events surrounding the industry. In many ways, such a game is like a large black box we sit around in a circle. In any case, we can observe the black box in the middle and have different amounts of knowledge what the origins of its existence were. Maybe you are in a position to have seen what influenced the black box, because you could observe the person sitting next to you make a decision that affected the thing. Maybe you sat on the other side of the table with no chance of seeing what was going on. Such is the nature of the games industry and no level of involvement shall turn you into an all-seeing observer. The nature of this community is bringing together people of various levels of insights on each given topic. This often spawns discussions interpreting a news item from different perspectives.

Sometimes, and I do not want to absolve myself of that either, we "play" this community like a game. Sid Meier once said that a game was a series of interesting decision. We are presented with a scenario and make decisions hoping it will produce the outcome we desire. On weekends, we do that playing Civilization or something. During the week, this community can sometimes turn into a text driven video game called "Games Industry Manager 2014". Wherein we absorb the situation given by the news item and toss our own brand of decisions we would have made in that scenario into the round. It then becomes flurry messages trying to tell what Nintendo, Sony, Microsoft or Coca Cola should do about the topic raised in the news item. I can see how that can be frustrating and infuriating for the companies that are at the receiving end.

While these last types of posts do not present a threat to anybody and are anything but the end of the civilized world itself, there might be an argument here to split them off into something else. Mark the post, have a second thread focusing on the dimension of reader reacting by suggestion or something. One thread for one news items can only do so much. It's like trying to draw a 3D picture on a piece of paper with no line ever crossing, because that is how it is in real life. For better or worse this entire culture of commenting will be part of the user experience of this site as long as commenting exists.

Posted:9 months ago

#95

Bruce Everiss Marketing Consultant

1,692 594 0.4
@Darren Adams
Though I have to laugh at the irony of point 2 Bruce. :D
My contribution to various debates is erudite, well thought out, based on vast experience and is usually right.
I never denigrate anything irrationally or because it is a brand that competes with the brand I am emotionally engaged with.

So when I said a long time ago that WiiU= Dreamcast there was no fanboyism involved at all. Just incisive analysis.
Back then I suffered personal abuse for this view. Now only Nintendo fanboys don't agree.

Posted:9 months ago

#96

Dan Wood Visual Effects Artist

36 59 1.6
Like a few others here, I'll admit to having had no direct professional involvement with the games industry (aside from working on the effects for an E3 trailer of Trials Fusion/Frontier last year). I'm a visual effects industry pro with 10 years experience, but while I've considered dipping my professional toe in the games industry on occasion, my interest at this point only amounts to a hobbiest-level interest in game design.

I'll certainly fully understand if you take the decision to revoke my commenting rights, but I'll cross my fingers that it doesn't happen. I rather value the chance this website gives me to have rational, considered discussions with thoughtful and experienced professionals. There aren't many places like it on the internet these days.

Posted:9 months ago

#97

Anthony Gowland Lead Designer, Outplay Entertainment

214 752 3.5
- This suggested action is not well received by most here.
If you assume that the opinions of the most vocal section of your audience match the opinions of the majority, I can see how you'd reach that conclusion. It's not really a safe assumption, though.

Rather than a mass culling it'd be nice to be able to set accounts to "ignore" to not see them. It'd make it very easy to tune comments threads to your own personal interpretation of signal/noise.

Posted:9 months ago

#98

Dan Wood Visual Effects Artist

36 59 1.6
@Bruce Everiss
Surely using the word "erudite" in a discussion should be considered cheating. It's just too juicy and powerful, there really should be a rule against it.

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Dan Wood on 2nd February 2014 1:57pm

Posted:9 months ago

#99

Darren Adams Managing Director, ChaosTrend

273 624 2.3
Really Bruce? Really???

Playing the "I am always right because I am oh so experienced" card when all you have to do is look back at all your Zynga fanboyism to glimpse the irony as I pointed out. Deny it if you want, but those who have read your posts before know what I am on about.

Anyway I am not here to pander to your ego, there are more important things that need discussing.

@Anthony Gowland
Sure, an ignore poster button would be great, it has been mentioned before and it is a good alternative to mass culling.

Edited 2 times. Last edit by Darren Adams on 2nd February 2014 2:56pm

Posted:9 months ago

#100

Dan Howdle Head of Content, Existent

281 814 2.9
Be mature and contributive - that's all I'm reading here, and that's all to the good.

Those who aren't are poopy-pants pooheads anyway.

Posted:9 months ago

#101

Alfonso Sexto Lead Tester, Ubisoft Germany

837 671 0.8
@James:
"Alfonso, as for where we draw the line, we're making it pretty broad actually, so yes we include press (debate about whether press are a part of the industry notwithstanding). I had an educator in game design asking me if that qualifies - yes, game education definitely counts."
Exactly the kind of complete answer that I expected. Thanks :)

Posted:9 months ago

#102

Alfonso Sexto Lead Tester, Ubisoft Germany

837 671 0.8
@Bruce

"My contribution to various debates is erudite, well thought out, based on vast experience and is usually right."

Bruce, you qualified 7million consoles sold in two weeks (a record for the console market, let's remember that) as "worthless" really sorry but considering how beneficial that was for the industry as a whole (yes, even mobile) I think that was far from "well thought" field and more into "passionate" one.

I don't like fanboys either, I tend to ignore them too. But sound ironic because you get quite close to be one of mobile devices and your dislike for everything related to consoles is easily spotted for everyone here. One thing is not liking something, like me with mobile games, but I would never call the work of companies lie Zynga as "worthless".

Just saying man.

Posted:9 months ago

#103

Bruce Everiss Marketing Consultant

1,692 594 0.4
@Darren Adams
look back at all your Zynga fanboyism
The anti Zynga vitriol on here is disgusting.
All I have ever done is to bring balance.
Zynga are a huge player in the game industry, this alone commands respect.
They also developed the whole science of metrics which massively advanced the industry.

@Alfonso Sexto
you qualified 7million consoles sold in two weeks (a record for the console market, let's remember that) as "worthless"
7 million in the whole world (they were released into far more markets than previous generations) is sating game hobbyist demand. They have to do far more than this to reach critical mass. Successive audiences will be more difficult to acquire.
And active smartphones will surpass two thousand million this year. If they haven't already. Getting past 7 million users for a smartphone game is a common event.
Smartphones are heading for ubiquity, for 7 billion active devices. It is up to us as an industry to work out how to provide experiences that this audience wants.

Posted:9 months ago

#104

Morville O'Driscoll Blogger & Critic

1,613 1,476 0.9
Without wishing to be rude, I think this is exactly what is meant when people say "more moderation is needed". This is an article (and feedback thread) about commenting on this website. To veer so dramatically off-topic is not useful.

Posted:9 months ago

#105

Darren Adams Managing Director, ChaosTrend

273 624 2.3
I agree Morville. My one throwaway line was never intended as an opportunity for Bruce to make it about him.

Anyway, back on topic.

I do like the idea of a report/thumbs down and ignore user button (please implement an ignore user button!!). I think this would be a great way to keep the balance without having to resort to anything drastic. Those would allow people to cut off the pointless posts, like the ones that have appeared in the last few comments (yes, Bruce's & my comments from 100 down are pointless).

Maybe the thumbs down button has some kind of limit of say 10 negs to have your post automatically minimised. I think there should be a maximise button so if people want to read it they can, but to all others who read the comments their posts stay minimised on page launch.

Posted:9 months ago

#106

Renaud Charpentier Lead Designer, The Creative Assembly

66 144 2.2
We don't need political correctness as long as this remains a debate between specialists and, precisely, it is not done in front of the entire world. So yes, GI should be selective on who can contribute and read, not to segregate, but on the contrary to offer a special place to exchange with peers. As many already said, if you want to talk about video game with everyone, fine, there are already plenty of web space to do so, and it's great.

But in these spaces I wouldn't/couldn't say the same things under my real name and title as I would always risk a "public" and potentially damaging controversy. If some wants to address the entire world, for any reasons, there are blogs and twitter for that.

It's not moderation we need, we are grown up enough, it's freedom of speech, and nowadays it comes only in private places, not public ones.

Posted:9 months ago

#107

Robin Clarke Producer, AppyNation Ltd

331 784 2.4
This suggested action is not well received by most here.
You think a handful of commenters represents the entire readership of the site?

...

Can posts that get reported a lot be automatically hidden? Or better still the option to mute specific users? With utterly tiresome predictability the behaviours I've pointed out as ripe for moderation have shown up in this thread.

Posted:9 months ago

#108

Darren Adams Managing Director, ChaosTrend

273 624 2.3
@Robin

Certainly not, it is from the comments in this thread. And besides it is my opinion on the mood of the 100+ comments, so it is open for interpretation of course. No problem if you disagree, you are entitled to your opinion as am I.

I agree with your second paragraph as it is pretty much what I said two posts above.

Posted:9 months ago

#109

James Prendergast Research Chemist

736 434 0.6
@Renaud Charpentier

I think you have a good point. I think your point is misplaced though, as GI is a public-facing site (unless they block it like that "secret developers site" back in the early 2000s - not sure if that's still going) and unless it becomes less so (i.e. even more locked down than might be technically taken from the above article, I can't see how you would feel any better about expressing yourself with your real name as people from other entities within the industry will still be able to see your expressed beliefs.

On the other hand - there are already developer-focused forums, as much as there are game focused forums for consumers. Those respective discussions belong on both of those respective types of sites. GI, as far as I can tell and am aware of, is neither. Like you and others have expressed the wish to do so, should not those discussions be taken from here? GI can never be a private place unless it gets locked down completely. That means no public-facing news either.

Posted:9 months ago

#110

Iain Stanford Experienced Software Engineer, Tinderstone

36 140 3.9
I don't think we should be muting people just because of their differing opinions or because they don't express those opinions how we'd like.

This shouldn't become a site with a reputation of muting people that don't adhere to the status quo.

Posted:9 months ago

#111

Keldon Alleyne Handheld Developer, Avasopht Ltd

455 443 1.0
So when I said a long time ago that WiiU= Dreamcast there was no fanboyism involved at all. Just incisive analysis.
Back then I suffered personal abuse for this view. Now only Nintendo fanboys don't agree.
I don't think you experienced abuse because you expected the Wii-U to fail. I'll bet you I could have made the same claim without a backlash, it's just a matter of how it's perceived by the commenters.

Personally I expected the Wii to fail hard. Bad name, underpowered hardware and a lack of HD. Then I played it and realised I was wrong. I did that while being appreciative of Nintendo, and I imagine many did the same.

I felt too many bad decisions were made on the Wii-U. Too little power at too high of a price for not enough of a unique gaming experience - at least not without killer apps. I think a lot of people were just of the mind of reserving judgement. I recall that being stated in just about every discussion. People were just agnostic, but you went Full Gloom - you never go Full Gloom!

---

Personally I think the problem (particularly with threads derailing) has nothing to do with people's role in the industry and it is just a matter of individuals failing to discuss peacefully. It's as simple as that. Once people respect others ideas and acknowledge each other as individuals you will see people getting along and having great discussions.

People don't have to have the same point of view and people don't even have to agree to disagree. All that people need to do is think about how they can add to the conversation and treat it as a conversation rather than a soap box to profess their love for Nintendo or their optimism for the PS4.

---
My contribution to various debates is erudite, well thought out, based on vast experience and is usually right.
Personally I found that quite funny. Nobody else has had the guts to make such a claim.

But that is what I came here for, not so much in the comments but the articles until I discovered the comments had even more. I was amazed that so many senior figures were sharing ideas with independent developers and students, and that it all seemed to result in a greater collective commentary on the industry.

---

One more time I'll repeat, it's mostly a battle of wills.

Edited 2 times. Last edit by Keldon Alleyne on 3rd February 2014 10:34pm

Posted:9 months ago

#112

Robin Clarke Producer, AppyNation Ltd

331 784 2.4
I don't think we should be muting people just because of their differing opinions or because they don't express those opinions how we'd like.
No, I'm suggesting muting people who don't add anything interesting or relevant to the discussion.

Posted:9 months ago

#113

Bruce Everiss Marketing Consultant

1,692 594 0.4
@Robin Clarke
No, I'm suggesting muting people who don't add anything interesting or relevant to the discussion.
And who will the arbiter be? You?

Posted:9 months ago

#114

Shane Sweeney Academic

401 418 1.0
@Bruce Everiss
So when I said a long time ago that WiiU= Dreamcast there was no fanboyism involved at all. Just incisive analysis.
Back then I suffered personal abuse for this view. Now only Nintendo fanboys don't agree.
I think it wasn't for your view, more the inflammatory nature in the way you stated it. Calling a platform "a dreamcast" has been a pejorative used online by the gaming community since... well the Dreamcast.

When the comparison is made it's done in bad faith and not very constructive to proper discourse. Language matters.

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Shane Sweeney on 3rd February 2014 1:48pm

Posted:9 months ago

#115

Anthony Gowland Lead Designer, Outplay Entertainment

214 752 3.5
And who will the arbiter be? You?
Each individual. You log in, you can choose who you see and don't see. Bliss.

Just implement the comments system from your sister sites.

Posted:9 months ago

#116

Darren Adams Managing Director, ChaosTrend

273 624 2.3
It definitely makes sense for users to self moderate what users posts they don't want to see. Seems like one of the simplest solutions and hopefully easiest to implement.

Posted:9 months ago

#117
Moderation is just another form of censorship. Enforcing the rules is a good thing because it is supposed to be an industry website.

For everyone who has a problem with the sound to noise ratio with the comments then GamesIndustry.biz could implement a system to automatically prune the comments section to the users specification. At it's most basic level you could just prune all comments by certain users. If you want to censor what you hear then it's up to you.

Frankly I have found myself being drawn into the same kind of discussion over and over again so obviously I don't have the will power to resist so that may be a big benefit to me.

Posted:9 months ago

#118

Aaron Johnson

24 40 1.7
@ Iain
This shouldn't become a site with a reputation of muting people that don't adhere to the status quo.
Nor should it become a platform for those pushing thinly-veiled agendas. Not only do these damage the credibility of the poster, but, by degrees, that of GI.biz.

I do enjoy reading the comments section. While I've come across many viewpoints both enlightened and grossly misinformed, I always come away with a better understanding of the industry. The author-participation is also a big plus. Like others, I've held multiple roles in the industry but hesitate to post for fear of my past experiences being seen as representing my current employer. How to solve that? I'm not sure.

Better moderation would be welcome, if only to keep threads on-topic and friendly. Condensing walls of text and an Ignore button are both good ideas. Personal messaging may also help keep down the tangential posts and conversations.

Posted:9 months ago

#119

James Prendergast Research Chemist

736 434 0.6
@Aaron Johnson: I've always held that "real names" and publicising/pushing the position and employer of the person interferes with the ideas and messages they present. That's the only way to solve it, for sure. If GI wanted to privately verify people's status and then allow them to post semi-anonymously that would work in the best interests of the majority I feel.

Unfortunately, there has been a push over the last few years to de-anonymize opinions and ideas through the misconception that doing so provides accountability*. I've yet to see any evidence that it does.

[edit]

*And I'm not talking solely about GI.biz here. Even certain writers on RPS, Blizzard's missteps into their current account systems and Google's emphasis on "identity" etc. are what I'm talking about. The cultivation of a good environment does not come from the identity of the poster/person, it comes from the identity of the social group - which is an entirely different thing.

Edited 2 times. Last edit by James Prendergast on 3rd February 2014 2:45pm

Posted:9 months ago

#120
Aaron you hit the nail on the head regarding the problem although ironically I'm not sure what side you're on.

You highlight the fact that your problem is that you can't post because you don't want your opinion to be associated with your current employer which in today's world is totally understandable but also that people shouldn't post or even be allowed to post if they don't agree with the established view or in other words one their employer would take issue with.

The only direction that will lead to is having no comments.

Comments, ideas and opinions should not be feared, moderated or censored. If you want to do that then fine but I think people should simply be allowed to express what they think and have that tested. You don't speak for your company and shouldn't be held as if you do and quite frankly I think it's wrong that companies do this, they should be there to make a product or provide a service nothing more and certainly not to intrude upon personal freedoms in this way.

Posted:9 months ago

#121

Justin Biddle Software Developer

163 493 3.0
There's something ironic about a thread about the attempt to adjust how commenting works that has, to the best of my knowledge, the highest comment count of any post I've seen on here :D Not surprising though

Edited 2 times. Last edit by Justin Biddle on 3rd February 2014 3:34pm

Posted:9 months ago

#122

James Brightman Editor in Chief, GamesIndustry.biz

259 457 1.8
Once the Report button gets implemented (soon...) what should happen is any time one of you reports a comment, the GI staff will get an email notifying us that it's been reported. Then we can take a look and delete it or take other actions. Of course, if there's abuse of the Report button just because you disagree with someone's viewpoint, that itself is going to be a problem. So fingers crossed it's used judiciously.

As for the ridiculous assertions that some external pressures are making us enforce the rules, all I can say is that's not the case and feel free to believe me or not. We want our user base to be industry. This is one reason why: http://www.gamesindustry.biz/articles/2014-02-03-announcing-the-gamesindustry-innovation-awards

Posted:9 months ago

#123

Rick Lopez Illustrator, Graphic Designer

1,269 941 0.7
I dont agree with putting caps on comments nore about muting comments. I think if you want to go a place and speak you should also be available to listen and the community can grow by the exchange of thoughts and ideas. Its not proper to silenece those who dont adhere to your point of view. I dont agree with the views of some people here, but at times, they will say something I can learn from or think is right. But these are just my opinions.

I come here for the forums. Its the only place I bother commenting, because I initially was looking for a games business oriented website, without all the kids, trolls and fanboys. And this forum should be directed towards like minded individuals and proffesionals. Ive compiled a list of recommendations for rules and features that may come in handy.

RULES:
1) Forums are directed at seriouse game industry oriented threads and any individual that is not engaged in these topics or continuosly posts comments not related them shall be banned.
2) No disrespectful comments towards individuals and products. - you can state that you disagree without being a jerk.
3) No cursing or swear words towards individuals or products - not because you may not be right but it closes the door for people feeling offended, as there better ways to get your thoughts through without cursing.
4) No trolling or fanboyism - No comments like: "PS4 is better than XB1" or "WiiU sucks". If your going to say something like that, explain why thats all.
5) Rules should be very black and white without being Ambiguous

FEATURES:
1) A private message feature - Alot of times I find myself wanting to address a specific individual on something specific to them in which case I need to recure to the forums instead. This often leads to off topic comments. This feature would allow members to interact on a more private note, able to share emails and contact information and this feature would quite the noise there is in the forums.This feature is also good for discussing any mishaps or heated discussions privately. For Example, if in a heated discussion an individual seems offended, you can send a private message saying your sorry, you didnt mean it and no hard feelings, rather than do it on the forums. This feature is good if you want to discuss things that are off topic with other individuals.
2) Collapse-able comments - Only the first 3000 or 5000 characters will be displayed. Any comments that are longer will be followed by a "Show More"/ "Show Less" button. This will help quite the noise in the forums and keeping members from having to scroll down so much when a long comment is posted.
3) The ability to comment directly at a users comments - I often find myself wanting to comment on a users comments, but I arrive after 20 other users comment on the thread and what happens is my comment will be all the way at the bottom and it it most likely wont be seen by the individual it was directed at or even remain relevant. These may also be collapsed.
4) A Report Button - This will allow users to report on comments they deam offensive or disrespectful. However individuals who report must also explain why. As this report feature may also be abused, by people who simply disagree with anothers views, because there are people who have there own agendas and want to promote certain products and this button can be easily abused in order to "oust" said user who does not agree with them. It can also be abused by members of large companies who's sole purpose is to filter out comments that are directed against their own agenda. EXAMPLE: Microsofts online policies regarding XBOX1 and kinect. What will keep members of microsoft from reporting every comment that doesnt speak in favor of their company policies.
5)A follow button - Id like to be able to follow certain threads and not have to dig through all the articles in order to find a specific thread.

Finally - these suggestion will serve to lower the "noise" people are complaining about but will keep the "openess" and ability for people to comment freely. It will also serve to segregate and direct comments towards an individual person, without disrupting the flow of a thread.

Edited 8 times. Last edit by Rick Lopez on 3rd February 2014 7:28pm

Posted:9 months ago

#124

Robin Clarke Producer, AppyNation Ltd

331 784 2.4
And who will the arbiter be? You?
No, the point of a "Mute" function is that any user can decide whose comments they want to see.

Posted:9 months ago

#125

Darren Adams Managing Director, ChaosTrend

273 624 2.3
Once the Report button gets implemented (soon...) what should happen is any time one of you reports a comment, the GI staff will get an email notifying us that it's been reported.
That is great to know James, thank you for listening to the suggestions put forward.

Posted:9 months ago

#126
@James.

Once something has been reported is there going to be a policy that GamesIndustry.biz moderators have to adhere to and is that going to be made public?

Are we going to be allowed to comment on that. :-)

Edited 1 times. Last edit by John Owens on 3rd February 2014 4:39pm

Posted:9 months ago

#127

Aaron Johnson

24 40 1.7
@ John Owens
Aaron you hit the nail on the head regarding the problem although ironically I'm not sure what side you're on.
I'm 100% for transperancy, it keeps everyone honest and spares us from all the vitriol and one-liners found on other sites.

What I'm struggling with is having to predicate every post with "Back when I was a buyer for so-and-so..." and not coming off as boorish. In most cases though, someone else comes along and posts what I was going to say anyway (much more articulately), so I throw them a star.

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Aaron Johnson on 3rd February 2014 5:09pm

Posted:9 months ago

#128
Ok that cleared that up Aaron. I misunderstood what you meant when you said you feared being seen that it represented your current employer.

I appreciate the benefits of transparency and overall I agree but perhaps not 100% as I also appreciate the difficulty it may put people in and wouldn't want to see censorship because of it.

Edited 1 times. Last edit by John Owens on 3rd February 2014 9:07pm

Posted:9 months ago

#129

Eric Leisy VR Production Designer, Nike

117 127 1.1
This horse seems to be dead and bloodied beyond recognition, but I appreciate the effort that this site is going through to keep the site on message. This web site is a nice oasis and respite from the other gaming sites out there, for the most part. This site is not immune to flame wars and vitriolic comments simply because it is developer focused, but it is nice to "cross swords" with people who at least have a background in this industry. I think few gamers understand or appreciate the pressures of deadlines and what the "crunch" is beyond just a word, and it can be difficult to have a truly level discussion with people who don't have that connection.

I can appreciate people being worried about getting booted "from the club," especially especially if they've been here for a while. This site has a great community, and I always look forward to visiting this site daily, and am happy that I've been able to be a part of this community for a few years now, even if I mostly just lurk.

Posted:9 months ago

#130

Eyal Teler Programmer

93 99 1.1
A lot has been said, and my own opinion will just repeat a subset of it. So I'll just say one thing:

When you decide which people are going to lose commenting privileges, please let them know in advance, and set up a topic where they can post their goodbyes. I think that would be much better than the preemptive "I might not make it, so I'll say goodbye" type of messages.

Posted:9 months ago

#131

Jim Webb Executive Editor/Community Director, E-mpire Ltd. Co.

2,284 2,493 1.1
Bravo, James and team.

I like the changes I've seen recently. Post count, star count, star to post ratio and long post cut off.

If I may add one more suggestion. When you click the Reply icon, can you make it so that it automatically quotes who you are replying to? Currently you need to copy and past their text and then use quote tags or the quote icon.

Posted:9 months ago

#132

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