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Nintendo targeting Wii U marketing to kids, families

Nintendo targeting Wii U marketing to kids, families

Wed 18 Dec 2013 7:38pm GMT / 2:38pm EST / 11:38am PST
MobileMarketing

Reggie Fils-Aime lays out holiday plan for latest console, says Nintendo experimenting with mobile experiences

With the Xbox One and PS4 fighting over the core gaming crowd this holiday season, Nintendo is targeting its Wii U marketing elsewhere. In an interview with Seattle NBC affiliate King-5, Nintendo of America president Reggie Fils-Aime said the system is enjoying strong holiday momentum, thanks in part to a renewed and refocused marketing push.

"The marketing has tremendously ramped up," Fils-Aime said. "And really where it comes down to is being crystal clear in who's your target. For us, this holiday with the Wii U, the target is parents and their kids. So if you're watching primetime family entertainment, you're seeing our marketing. If you're a parent watching morning or daytime media, you're seeing our content."

Fils-Aime declined to give specifics about Nintendo's marketing spend, but did expound on the company's overall strategy.

"More than just the dollars, we're putting our product where the consumer can see it, touch it, and feel it," Fils-Aime said. "We're in over 20 malls across the country. We're creating an opportunity for consumers to see the product, because that, for Nintendo, is where the 'wow' happens. It's not when you talk about specs or technology."

Fils-Aime also addressed continued calls for Nintendo to begin making games for smartphones and tablets. While he stressed a corporate philosophy that Nintendo games are best played on Nintendo devices, Fils-Aime said the company has been doing "experimentation" on mobile platforms. However, he cautioned that experimentation is "largely going to be much more marketing activity oriented," and designed to push users to experiences on the 3DS or Wii U rather than serve as stand-alone experiences in themselves.

"What drives us is creating fantastic experiences for consumers that in the end we're able to monetize as a for-profit company," Fils-Aime said. "The issue is that if you have games out there on all of these smart devices for very small amounts of money, it's very difficult to monetize. And if you look at all of these companies who are trying to do it, there aren't many that are doing it long-term, profitably."

41 Comments

Jim Webb
Executive Editor/Community Director

2,210 2,051 0.9
Popular Comment
My Christmas wish this year is for journalists and investors to stop asking/demanding that Nintendo put their IP on something other than their own hardware.

Posted:4 months ago

#1

Techni Myoko
Programmer

24 26 1.1
Noooooo....
Those are the exact people I don't want them focussing on.... Stop making the system worse

Posted:4 months ago

#2

Greg Wilcox
Creator, Destroy All Fanboys!

1,993 902 0.5
Beat me to it, Jim... Yeah, but it'll never happen, those comments stopping...

Posted:4 months ago

#3

Rick Lopez
Illustrator, Graphic Designer

1,205 817 0.7
What Jim said and....

To be honest its a move that may work for them, simply because when i go christmas shopping, I see kids begging for a WiiU or 3DS. And frankly I think its good that kids can have video game products that caters to them. And while Microsoft and Xbox are battling out with the more adult oriented, graphics AAA heavy harcore games, Nintendo has simply aimed for a differant audience. And frankly, their games consistantly get reviews of 8 or higher.

If Nintendo were to release there IP on other platforms the magic will fade away into obscurity, just like most titles on mobile platforms. Having expiriences that people can only find on there products is what will keep them in business for years to come.

However my final wish is that they dont leave out the adult crowd who grew up with them and we get more games like Bayonetta 2 and "X" as well.

Besides, the WiiU is the next console Im gonna purchase.

Posted:4 months ago

#4

Bruce Everiss
Marketing Consultant

1,716 598 0.3
Popular Comment
When you have a lemon, you make lemonade.
Nintendo are spot on in avoiding the new generation consoles in the market.
They have identified the customers who are most likely to buy their box. And how to reach them with the right message.
Classical professional marketing.

Posted:4 months ago

#5

Alfonso Sexto
Lead Tester

716 498 0.7
@Techni
I'm afraid that is the only market they have now.

@Bruce
Basically what I said above but with more detailed words. Agreed.

Posted:4 months ago

#6

Daniel Hughes
Studying PhD Literary Modernism

410 455 1.1
@ Jim

Merry Christmas!! http://www.theverge.com/2013/12/18/5223538/why-the-wii-u-failure-wont-change-nintendo

Not quite what you asked for, but some reasoned analysis that takes into account the fact Nintendo don't operate the way other publishers/manufacturers do.

Posted:4 months ago

#7
Admit that the dev team picked the wrong hardware, wrong market and wrong lineup - then start again with a new team... rather than try and target an audience that you had not planned on originally! either the original plan was right and stay the course, or it was wrong and you have to clear the decks?

Posted:4 months ago

#8

Tom Keresztes
Programmer

632 223 0.4
Admit that the dev team picked the wrong hardware, wrong market and wrong lineup - then start again with a new team.
But then the team wont learn from their past mistakes.

Posted:4 months ago

#9

David Serrano
Freelancer

280 247 0.9
@Bruce Everiss

But if Nintendo adhered to the Blue Ocean / disruptive technology strategy with the Wii U, wouldn't the default goal have been to target consumers who needs and preferences are not being addressed by Sony and Microsoft... mid-core and non-hardcore core players? Consumers who don't need the power or functionality of the PS3 - PS4 or 360 - XBO and or, don't value the game libraries for those systems... but would find value a less powerful system which exclusively offered games and services aligned with their needs, preferences and desires?

So to me, it seems like the Wii U is struggling because it was created for a specific audience but Nintendo inexplicably doesn't have the games and services needed to appeal to that audience. The question is do they understand this but can't publicly acknowledge it? Or are they actually as confused as they seem to be? I suspect it's the first but I'm starting to have doubts.

Edited 2 times. Last edit by David Serrano on 19th December 2013 4:42pm

Posted:4 months ago

#10

Pete Thompson
Owner / Admin

147 63 0.4
I just assumed that with the IP they have that Nintendo always targeted kids and / or families, I've not yet seen a Nintendo exclusive that was aimed at adults or core or casual gamer's.. But I could be wrong..

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Pete Thompson on 19th December 2013 6:12pm

Posted:4 months ago

#11

Klaus Preisinger
Freelance Writing

953 804 0.8
The last sentence is such a nice way of saying "remember, we watch companies go out of business, not the other way around". It is like being slapped by a choked to death puppy with nice glitter and festive decorations all over it; Reggie slapped.

Posted:4 months ago

#12

Mohammed Alsadoon
Staff Writer

19 9 0.5
@Pete Thompson:

On the WiiU specifically? Currently ZombiU could be put there as is the Wonderful 101. In the future, Bayonetta 2 and "X"

Posted:4 months ago

#13

Richard Browne
EVP Gaming and Interactive

77 67 0.9
I don't see how Nintendo has changed tact here ; their audience has and will always be kids and family. Every launch cycle they say they're going to target the core demographic and they never end up hitting it (after all they wanted Saints Row on 3DS for heavens sakes!!!). This time around it was Ubisoft's Zombie game. Both launches were poor because the kids/family Nintendo flagship titles were missing and the price was too high. They did a fantastic job of refocusing the 3DS and got the price down, now they have some of the titles for Wii-U but Reggie can spout to Moms all he likes at $299 it's too expensive. That is not the price of a toy, and Nintendo machines are regarded as toys. They aren't in competition with Microsoft or Sony. The controller is still a disaster that could end up sinking the machine, it makes price reduction extremely difficult and Nintendo has done nothing to tell the consumer WHY it's such a great feature (mostly because I don't think even their engineers have found a hook for it - which for Nintendo is highly unusual). Like the 3D gimmick on 3DS the Wii-U controller, to date, is just seen as a gimmick. Unfortunately for Nintendo this gimmick costs $100 and can't be removed as easily the more titles that come out that use it.

Posted:4 months ago

#14

Greg Wilcox
Creator, Destroy All Fanboys!

1,993 902 0.5
Pete Thompson: First party titles (with third party developers) Eternal Darkness and Geist on the GameCube would disagree with you slightly as would all of the Metroid Prime games (although the latter are in a way "family" oriented because they're not "mature" in any way, shape or form). That's not counting, of course some N64 titles (Conker's Bad Fur Day was DEFINITELY not a family game!), but I'll just bypass anything made in the last century (for now)...

Posted:4 months ago

#15

Jed Ashforth
Senior Game Designer, Immersive Technology Group

90 140 1.6
"We're in over 20 malls across the country."
Is he talking abou the US? That doesn't sound like many?

Posted:4 months ago

#16

Christian Keichel
Journalist

417 565 1.4
Is he talking abou the US? That doesn't sound like many?
I think what he means is, they have 20 teams at the same time in malls all over the country, these teams are in every mall for only a few hours to do their promotionm then go to the next mall.

Posted:4 months ago

#17

Jeff Kleist
Writer, Marketing, Licensing

209 85 0.4
They set up shop for a weekend typically. Remember when the virtua Boy team was in the mall the same day as the aplayStation launch. They were pretty pissed when I told them my master system did better 3d a decade earlier. I hope their teams like babysitting the children, because having run similar events in the past, that's what's going to happen. You must be ever vigilant to keep the parent less kids to a minimum. If I only had $10 a head, I could've mopped up. Typically the temps they hire to run these booths are pretty awful (I carried a knowledgeable crew), so I wish them luck

Posted:4 months ago

#18

Christian Keichel
Journalist

417 565 1.4
I looked it up, it's not like I thought, it's in fact 23 locations, not 23 teams
http://www.nintendo.com/events/holidaymallexperience

I agree, this doesn't sound like a big number to me either.

Posted:4 months ago

#19

Christopher Ingram
Editor-at-Large

36 27 0.8
Had Nintendo not changed its advertisement/marketing strategies on its second E3 reveal, I think the controller would have been better integrated into its games; remember, the Wii U (Wii You) was originally designed as a core gaming console that combined the power of a home console with the unique features of the 3DS.

Once it brought the multitude of controllers and local multiplayer focus aboard, I started stating it publicly that this decision had the potential to be disastrous for the longevity of the console. When the consoles' core design, and the way that its advertised and marketed don't align, you confuse the mainstream media, whom so many of which make purchases based on impulse - pricing plays a great factor here, just as you already stated.

People don't see a tablet and think "local multiplayer and family fun." Parents don't see the Wii U and a images/videos of four people with Wiimotes in their hands and think, "I've got to have that!" Instead, they look at it and wonder how in the world do you hook all of that up and "why does it still use those remotes if its a new system, that's a tablet?"

Slash the price to $199, get rid of the Wiimote and local multiplayer adverts and start showing games that take advantage of the GamePad's unique control features and this will start moving units a bit better in my opinion - retain the family oriented marketing, of course. I thought that the indie market would shine on this console with its unique control interfaces, but the support just hasn't been there, sadly.

Do remember though, the Wii in a nutshell was a gimmick, just as Kinect is. Gimmicks that are properly marketed have the potential to sell extremely well.

Posted:4 months ago

#20

Richard Browne
EVP Gaming and Interactive

77 67 0.9
Two problems with that Christopher, the tablet controller restricts them being able to reduce the price to $199 and local family co-op is Nintendo's strongest suit and appeal. Dump the tablet (which nobody has used effectively anyway, it's the least integrated hardware/software feature Nintendo's ever launched IMHO) and ship the thing at $199 with four classic controllers and Mario. That'd shift units! Would need to be Wii-U2 at that point though. Wii-U jr.?

Posted:3 months ago

#21

Christian Keichel
Journalist

417 565 1.4
Dump the tablet (which nobody has used effectively anyway, it's the least integrated hardware/software feature Nintendo's ever launched IMHO)
I couldn't disagree more, during the last days I played a lot Super Mario 3D World while lying on my Sofa, the TV turned off. Off TV play is a major feature of the console and only possible with the Gamepad. The same goes for the Miiverse, something which Nintendo clearly plans to expand over the following years (I am sure we will see the Miiverse on any upcoming handheld and console from NIntendo from now on).
The Miiverse is only possible when you have a touchscreen in your hand while playing, it allows a seamless integration of a social network into every game. Nintendo is making interesting use of this integration. In Super Mario 3D World, you have the possibility to comment on every level and you can decorate your posts with stamps you find hidden within the levels. In Zelda WW HD you can post messages or pictures from within the game, that can be found be other players online in bottles swimming in the ocean, these messages can be calls for help or pictures that you can use in the game to built miniature statues. Both features are used heavily by players all over the world, you constantly find new messages, drawings, screenshots in Zelda and after finishing a stage in Super Mario 3D world, there are hundreds of comments that can be read how much people (dis)liked the stage and what they think in general of the game. Sometimes I find myself not playing the game anymore but browsing the Miiverse, just realising, that I can go back anytime into the game with the touch of a single button.
These features show that even apart from second screen gaming, the Gamepad is integrated in the whole Wii U system, take it away and a lot of things would suddenly collapse.

Edited 2 times. Last edit by Christian Keichel on 23rd December 2013 10:14pm

Posted:3 months ago

#22

Art C. Jones
Writer / Blogger

58 75 1.3
The tablet is the swiss knife of controllers.
It makes game play possible that can not be replicated by the other consoles.
What Nintendo should do is double-down on the tablet, not step away from it. You go where you are unique. Running to be like everyone else is a losing strategy.

Posted:3 months ago

#23

Greg Wilcox
Creator, Destroy All Fanboys!

1,993 902 0.5
All that and hell, Microsoft and Sony are more or less copying that GamePad by making you buy a second system or a tablet or other device if you don't have one just to enjoy 2nd screen experiences on their hardware. The Wii U still works the best with games made for that GamePad in terms of a LOT less noticeable lag, period.

Posted:3 months ago

#24

Richard Browne
EVP Gaming and Interactive

77 67 0.9
Christian - if that's the USP of the Wii-U no wonder it's failing so badly. Social features? For a core 7-10 year old market??? The Gamepad is keeping the cost of the machine out of the Classic Nintendo demographic, and in effect breaks equality of the multiplayer experience - plus anyone with children will appreciate the difficulties of telling child B they have to use a wii mote in Mario rather than the fancy Gamepad! To me it's a feature polar opposite to their audience.

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Richard Browne on 24th December 2013 4:45pm

Posted:3 months ago

#25

Paul Jace
Merchandiser

770 1,005 1.3
When have Nintendo not marketed their systems and handhelds towards kids and families?

Posted:3 months ago

#26

Christian Keichel
Journalist

417 565 1.4
Social features? For a core 7-10 year old market???
It may surprise you, 7-10 year olds are social beings too. Seriously, kids love to exchange messages and drawings with their friends, that's hardly a new discovery.

Posted:3 months ago

#27

Richard Browne
EVP Gaming and Interactive

77 67 0.9
And as a parent I bar my children from any social online interaction unless explicitly known as safe.

Posted:3 months ago

#28

Christian Keichel
Journalist

417 565 1.4
And as a parent I bar my children from any social online interaction unless explicitly known as safe.
And that's the reason Nintendo created Miiverse, because they think a social network created by Nintendo is something parents would consider as "safe".
Just out of interest, did you ever tried the Miiverse and know how it works? I ask, because I don't see how the Miiverse can be considered as unsafe for children, but maybe I am overlooking something.

EDIT: Besides, why do you think the statement "For us, this holiday with the Wii U, the target is parents and their kids." means Nintendo*s core target group is 7-10 year old? Most families I know consist of parents who like video games as well and many families I know have children in the range of 10-14 that also like to play video games and they find Mario Kart, Super Mario Bros., Smash Bros., Pokemon, etc. appealing as well.

Edited 5 times. Last edit by Christian Keichel on 25th December 2013 11:16am

Posted:3 months ago

#29

Jeff Kleist
Writer, Marketing, Licensing

209 85 0.4
@Christian

Here's the issue with the WiiPad. The off-TV play was designed primarily for Japan, as is pretty much everything Nintendo does. In Japan, many families sleep in the "living room" together, and as such have one TV. While many in the core gamer audience find the off-TV feature attractive, it's designed so little Akira can play his games while Mom and dad watch the news. In the USA, kids often have their own TV, and those that don't wouldn't be allowed to take this into their room either more often than not. The ones who are curling up witht the family are on their phones, tablets or DS already, so they don't need something new.

The Pad costs about $80 to build, and does not contain parts that Nintendo owns or manufactures for the most part. It's a huge cost albatross around their neck that is bringing very little benefit. Simply allowing the DS to connect for the same purpose solves a lot of the same issues. The res a reason why 360/PS4 are still $199, and that's because they're having a lot of trouble reducing the costs on them further. The WiiU has the same problem, as it's already "slim", and applies many of the lessons learned by those consoles. Dropping the price any further any time soon is simply going to cost them a ton of money.

Nintendo needs to get out of the console business, and fast. There is nothing they offer but overpriced technologically ancient boxes without anything close to the kind if features the competition enjoyed 5 years ago. Continuing to sell to the faithful isn't sustainable that much longer, and the $1.5 billion or so it takes to launch a console is better spent on training your programming teams to handle HD development, the requirements of which they should have known from the rest of the world doing it for close to a decade.

I'm sure the "Nintendo is fine" brigade will be out in force soon. But they're not, they've got a decade of losing money, tops, without a radical restructuring of their entire company from the top down, installing people who aren't stuck in the 90s, or merging with someone like Apple, Nintendo is going to continue to bleed out, selling rehashes of Games whose core play hasn't changed since N64 to the ever shrinking circle of the faithful. It's not that they aren't good games, it's that they aren't system sellers in the slightest. To those outside the faith.

Posted:3 months ago

#30

Christian Keichel
Journalist

417 565 1.4
In Japan, many families sleep in the "living room" together, and as such have one TV. While many in the core gamer audience find the off-TV feature attractive, it's designed so little Akira can play his games while Mom and dad watch the news.
Leaves me clueless, why it's a bad thing to incorporate a feature that "many in the core gamer audience find [...] attractive"?
The Pad costs about $80 to build, and does not contain parts that Nintendo owns or manufactures for the most part.
Source?
Simply allowing the DS to connect for the same purpose solves a lot of the same issues.
No it doesn't, first of all, a single DS screen has a resolution of 320*200, hardly enough to see anything, if you stream a game rendered in 720p or 1080p and second, the PS4/PS Vita combo clearly shows the limits of simply pairing 2 devices. Even when the PS4 and the PS Vita both are much more powerful, when it comes to raw processing power, remote play has more artifacts then Off TV Play and runs only with 30 FPS.
The res a reason why 360/PS4 are still $199, and that's because they're having a lot of trouble reducing the costs on them further.
The PS3 and the 360 were subsidised by Sony and MS since day 1, profitability of the hardware wasn't a concern for them in 2005/2006, it isn't a concern for them in 2013, that's the reason, why you get the 360 frequently for $99.
Nintendo needs to get out of the console business, and fast.
Engadget.com June 2005:"Speculation amongst the gaming community has everyone wondering whether Nintendo might go the way of Sega and exit the console business entirely if the Revolution doesn't work out for them."
http://www.engadget.com/2005/05/17/engadget-amp-joystiqs-live-coverage-of-nintendos-revolution/

NGC Magazine #70, 2002, P.40 "Is Gamecube Nintendo's last console?"

People calling NIntendo to exit the console business are around for more then a decade now.
There is nothing they offer but overpriced technologically ancient boxes without anything close to the kind if features the competition enjoyed 5 years ago.
There wasn't motion controls before the Wii, there isn't second screen gaming outside the Wii U, there is no working Off TV-Play besides the Wii U, so your claim they are "technologically ancient boxes" is plain wrong. In fact every modern gaming PC is more powerful than the XBox One or PS4, are these "technologically ancient boxes" too? And if not, why?
and the $1.5 billion or so it takes to launch a console is better spent on training your programming teams to handle HD development
Source for this number? Source for the costs on "training your programming teams to handle HD development"? This sounds like Nintendo didn't released a single HD game in the last 12 months and it sounds like games from other developers never get pushed back. Both is wrong,
I'm sure the "Nintendo is fine" brigade will be out in force soon. But they're not, they've got a decade of losing money, tops, without a radical restructuring of their entire company from the top down, installing people who aren't stuck in the 90s, or merging with someone like Apple, Nintendo is going to continue to bleed out, selling rehashes of Games whose core play hasn't changed since N64 to the ever shrinking circle of the faithful. It's not that they aren't good games, it's that they aren't system sellers in the slightest. To those outside the faith.
A decade of losing money? You don't seem to be very familiar with Nintendo's financial reports, chances are good, that the company will stay out of the red in the current fiscal year.

Overall you sound like somebody who just doesn't like Nintendo games, that's fine, but if your argument boils down to Nintendo is " selling rehashes of Games whose core play hasn't changed since N64" it shows, that you obiously haven't played many Nintendo games after the N64 era (e.g. Pikmin, Wii Sports, Wii Fit, Nintendogs, Brain Train, Metroid Prime, Nintendoland, Luigi's Mansion, Super Mario Galaxy, Super Mario 3D Land, Kid Icarus: Uprising)

Edited 2 times. Last edit by Christian Keichel on 26th December 2013 10:45pm

Posted:3 months ago

#31

Greg Wilcox
Creator, Destroy All Fanboys!

1,993 902 0.5
Nice post/rubuttal, Christian, but a "Wii" bit of game history to add for your research: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/XaviXPort_gaming_console This came out about two years before the Wii and while nowhere near as popular, was a pioneer of sorts at getting asses up of the couch and active. I think they still sell these online, too.

Posted:3 months ago

#32

Richard Browne
EVP Gaming and Interactive

77 67 0.9
Christian ; I've played around with the Mii-verse a bit, but my kids (6/9) have never shown any interest in it whatsoever. Nintendo and online is pretty much an oxymoron. 7-10 is Nintendo's core audience, 10-14 is probably secondary, you're definitely moving into Microsoft and Sony territory at that juncture.

I don't think Nintendo are in that much difficulty, their brands and games will carry them when the price is right. The 3DS/2DS is doing great business again this Christmas because the pricepoint and quality of the content is compelling. The problem with the Wii-U is the price, it's $100 too expensive - and Jeff is right about the cost of the gamepad, in fact he may be a bit light given I heard directly from Redmond that if they were to retail it they couldn't do so for less than $100. Buying a replacement from Nintendo if you lost one costs $140.

Posted:3 months ago

#33

Christian Keichel
Journalist

417 565 1.4
7-10 is Nintendo's core audience, 10-14 is probably secondary, you're definitely moving into Microsoft and Sony territory at that juncture.
As you can see in the data Nintendo published for the Wii and the Nintendo DS a few years back, this isn't the case, the group 7-10 is the single largest group, but by no means the core audience, because the group of players older than 10 years is multiple times as big, as the group of 7-10 year old players:
http://www.nintendo.co.jp/ir/en/library/events/090508/05.html
in fact he may be a bit light given I heard directly from Redmond that if they were to retail it they couldn't do so for less than $100
Selling a product in retail and the production costs this product makes up in a bundle are by no means comparable.
Besides looking at the interiors of a Gamepad, I don't see, where the $80-$100 should come from. Every low end Android tablet has more expensive components (The Gamepad has no CPU, GPU or Memory) and the entry price for such a tablet is $50.

@ Greg
You are completely right, there were motion controls before the Wii.

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Christian Keichel on 27th December 2013 12:29am

Posted:3 months ago

#34

Richard Browne
EVP Gaming and Interactive

77 67 0.9
The single largest group isn't the core audience? Odd statement. Nintendo appeals to all ranges, 7-10 is their dominant place which is why the vast majority of their games ensure that age group can play them. With regards to the price of the gamepad, I've not broken one down, but if Nintendo is charging $140 to replace one, and announced they would sell them separately in Japan at 13,440 yen (about $128 today. $172 at the time) then either they're having a laugh at consumers expense or they're expensive to make. Which is exactly what they told me first hand, so I'm not really going to doubt them.

Posted:3 months ago

#35

Christian Keichel
Journalist

417 565 1.4
The single largest group isn't the core audience? Odd statement.
If the single largest group makes up about 10% of your customers (that's what the graphs suggest), it's of course not the core audience.
With regards to the price of the gamepad, I've not broken one down, but if Nintendo is charging $140 to replace one, and announced they would sell them separately in Japan at 13,440 yen (about $128 today. $172 at the time) then either they're having a laugh at consumers expense or they're expensive to make
And just because Apple is charging $600 for the iPhone 5 it means, it costs them so much money? Additionally, taking Yen retail prices and converting them into Dollar prices to get an idea of production costs for something, that isn't announced in retail in the US is not working.

Edited 2 times. Last edit by Christian Keichel on 27th December 2013 1:19am

Posted:3 months ago

#36

Richard Browne
EVP Gaming and Interactive

77 67 0.9
Christian for the last time mate, Nintendo themselves expressed the retail cost would be over $100, Nintendo themselves sell replacements for $140.

Core is the entry point, it's where Nintendo drive their customer base from. They don't go out advertising and selling to middle aged men or 15-35 year old males that make up Sony and Microsoft's core base.

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Richard Browne on 27th December 2013 1:58am

Posted:3 months ago

#37

Christian Keichel
Journalist

417 565 1.4
Christian for the last time mate, Nintendo themselves expressed the retail cost would be over $100, Nintendo themselves sell replacements for $140.
Richard, agaiin, a) the retail price of a product has not necessarily much to do with the production costs. The price of a product is mostly driven by what consumers are willing to pay and b) to say because Nintendo charges $140 for a single Gamepad when they replace it means the production costs of the Gamepad in a Wii U/Gamepad bundle are $100+ is pure speculation.
Core is the entry point
Core is core - Entry point is entry point
They don't go out advertising and selling to middle aged men or 15-35 year old males that make up Sony and Microsoft's core base.
Have you seen their commercials lately? Do you want to tell me the 4 Kids in this Super Mario World Commercial are 7-10 year olds and not teenagers?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eBbcUQyvXQw

In this commercial Nintendo clearly targets the whole family consisting of Kids and Adults:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bso27e3Inzc

Don't get me wrong, the kids market is important for Nintendo, but to say, it's their core market is plain wrong, Nintendo's core market is families, not kids.

Edited 3 times. Last edit by Christian Keichel on 27th December 2013 10:18am

Posted:3 months ago

#38

Richard Browne
EVP Gaming and Interactive

77 67 0.9
Christian last time x 2 ; directly from Nintendo the cost of the Gamepad (at the time of launch) was about $100. Straight from Nintendo. It's why they've not launched add on Gamepads, because they know they couldn't sell them. It's why they're not developing software to utilize two gamepads. It's why they can't price reduce the machine to $199 where it needs to be. Besides, you're a journalist Christian, phone up Steve Okimoto or Reggie and ask them. :)

And the kids in that second commercial most certainly are 7-10. First, no, but there's a thing called aspiration marketing - young kids look up to older, just as a 14 year aspires to play Halo and Call of Duty (and often is these days). I guess we can settled on 7-14 if you like, but from personal experience boys 10+ are already moving toward Microsoft/Sony, by 14 they're absolutely on those platforms.

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Richard Browne on 27th December 2013 5:54pm

Posted:3 months ago

#39

Christian Keichel
Journalist

417 565 1.4
Straight from Nintendo.
Sorry, not "straight from Nintendo", unless you can show me where anybody at Nintendo said in public that the costs of the Gamepad are $100, it's only straight from you.
Again (second time), what components do you think are included in the Gamepad, that would justify such production costs? No CPU, no GPU, no Ram and aside from the Broadcom Chip only standard components.Maybe you should take a look at the teardown of the Gamepad
http://www.ifixit.com/Teardown/Nintendo+Wii+U+Teardown/11796

I asked it before, 7 inch tablets with a similar display are sold for $50 and these tablets feature a CPU, GPU and Ram, if anything in the Gamepad would be so expensive it drives production costs to $100 like you suggest, you should be able tell me what it is.
And the kids in that second commercial most certainly are 7-10. First, no, but there's a thing called aspiration marketing - young kids look up to older, just as a 14 year aspires to play Halo and Call of Duty (and often is these days). I guess we can settled on 7-14 if you like, but from personal experience boys 10+ are already moving toward Microsoft/Sony, by 14 they're absolutely on those platforms.
Nice try, but your words where:
They don't go out advertising and selling to middle aged men or 15-35 year old males that make up Sony and Microsoft's core base.
And when I show you, they do exactly this, you say the commercial is aimed at 7 year olds, it only looks like it is aimed at older kids? Sounds odd at least.
Apart from this, you tend to ignore what I said about targeting families instead of Kids, maybe it helps to quote the article we are both commenting on:
For us, this holiday with the Wii U, the target is parents and their kids. So if you're watching primetime family entertainment, you're seeing our marketing. If you're a parent watching morning or daytime media, you're seeing our content.
The focus of Nintendo's US marketing lies on parents AND their kids, not only parents, not only kids, but both.
For what you said about male kids 10+, I can only again recommend you to take a look at the demographic data Nintendo published, that I linked in a previous comment.

Additionally your use of the term "core audience" is very loose, with Nintendo you say the core audience is 7-10, because it's the entry point for the audience and with Sony and Microsoft you say it's" 15-35 year old males that make up Sony and Microsoft's core base", in the first case you take a ridiculous small group of the overall audience, that makes up about 10% of the whole and in the second case you take an age group, that is so big, that it makes up an estimated 40%+ of all US gamers (not sure, why you insist on excluding female players, when 40% of all XBox Live users are female). This shows your use of the term "core audience" isn't very consistent and not based on facts, but on opinions.

Sources:
http://www.gamesindustry.biz/articles/2013-09-20-40-percent-of-xbox-live-users-female
http://www.theesa.com/facts/pdfs/ESA_EF_2013.pdf

Edited 2 times. Last edit by Christian Keichel on 28th December 2013 9:39am

Posted:3 months ago

#40

Andy Samson
QA Supervisor

223 170 0.8
Nintendo, rated "E" for everyone.

Posted:3 months ago

#41

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