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YouTube stands by Content ID system

YouTube stands by Content ID system

Tue 17 Dec 2013 10:56pm GMT / 5:56pm EST / 2:56pm PST
Technology

Video hosting site tells content creators to consider turning off background music to avoid claims

YouTube's crackdown on copyrighted material is entering its second week, and the online video site is sticking to its automated "Content ID" system of managing copyright claims despite widespread criticism from the video creating community. As reported by Kotaku, YouTube sent an e-mail explaining its current program to affected users, but offering no changes in how the system will be applied or enforced.

"Whether gaming, music or comedy is your passion, know that we love what you do," YouTube said. "We've worked hard to design Content ID and other tools to give everyone - from individual creators to media companies - the opportunity to make great videos and earn money. As YouTube grows, we want to make sure we're providing the right product features to ensure that everyone continues to thrive."

When the Content ID system identifies a video that uses images or audio matching YouTube's database of copyrighted material, it flags that content and follows the copyright holder's chosen course of action for such scenarios, which include blocking the content outright or taking the monetization rights from the user and attaching their own ads. However, false positives have been a problem, as game developers and musicians have been receiving claims on videos for which they hold all the rights.

YouTube's e-mail to content creators makes no acknowledgement of such problems, though it does link users to a page detailing options for disputing a Content ID match. The site also suggests that users creating video game content turn off background music for gameplay footage, as that may have been licensed by the publisher, and according to YouTube, the music license-holder is within its rights to block or monetize such videos.

10 Comments

Christopher Bowen
Editor in Chief

419 581 1.4
So all they did was add some fluff, make no changes, and keep the status quo.

Posted:9 months ago

#1

Greg Wilcox
Creator, Destroy All Fanboys!

2,175 1,124 0.5
The site also suggests that users creating video game content turn off background music for gameplay footage, as that may have been licensed by the publisher, and according to YouTube, the music license-holder is within its rights to block or monetize such videos.
Holy s#!t. That's the argument I made something like six or so years ago when I predicted they'd pull this stunt. I need to write stuff down and mail it or email it to myself more. This next one's a joke, but I say look for someone clever to make a mint writing original music for YouTube game channels where people pay a few cents to use a generic tune... or not.

Posted:9 months ago

#2

Alfonso Sexto
Lead Tester

807 637 0.8
"We want to make sure we're providing the right product features to ensure that everyone continues to thrive."

And that is why we are not moving a finger although even big companies are complaining about this policy.
Really lovely if you ask me.

Posted:9 months ago

#3

Steven Wemyss
Senior QA Engineer

33 31 0.9
So how does any of that explain people getting copyright claims from random 3rd parties on trailers for their own games such as Terry Cavanagh's VVVVVVV - https://twitter.com/terrycavanagh/status/413055480315920384

Posted:9 months ago

#4

Yiannis Koumoutzelis
Founder & Creative Director

362 207 0.6
This is an issue here in Germany (and I suspect other countries which take rights seriously as well). Many of these videos simply won't play. I had shot a video from a public location during a feiertag which got blocked by youtube because the song "girl of ipanema" was playing somewhere in the background from the loudspeakers on location. Another similarly during an open air classic music event.

Lately, even the national anthem of Greece was tagged as copyrighted material simply because a company somehow made a claim they owned the rights! :D Anyone using the national anthem of Greece would see their video blocked. Protecting the rights of creators is VERY important and serious, until it reaches levels of ridiculousness such as these! After that, nobody can take it seriously anymore!

Posted:9 months ago

#5

Martin Parker
Studying BSc (Hons) Computer Games Programming

6 13 2.2
Popular Comment
The bees in that hive over there look angry, maybe they'll calm down if I poke them with this stick.

Posted:9 months ago

#6

Klaus Preisinger
Freelance Writing

1,097 1,058 1.0
Popular Comment
Content creators need the opportunity to upload release waivers and other legal documentation. It is as simple as that. Currently, Google's system will smite you, even if you paid money to license a song for your production. That is plain amateurish and the more professional your production is, the more damaged Google's reputation as a platform partner will be. Google needs a system to check their finding against the documentation you attached on the producing end of the Youtube interface.

If you produce a video and spend money on it, only to find that you cannot protect your rights in the face of Google's automated terror. Then Google is no longer a platform of choice for creators of content.

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Klaus Preisinger on 18th December 2013 4:47pm

Posted:9 months ago

#7

Rick Cody
PBnGames-Board Member

144 14 0.1
I like that it prevents reposting of content. It's good for everyone to watch the same version of an original video (both for consumer ease of use and for a more accurate number of hits).
I'd like to be able to do covers of pop songs and allow content owners to run commercials. The content holder's content is a importan part of the reason my videos may be viewed, they should reap rewards for it.

They just needed to launch this copyright thing. It'll get fixed.

Posted:9 months ago

#8

Andreia Quinta
Creative & People Photographer

215 549 2.6
Google's just creating a massive opportunity for another video sharing website to take over. Keep it up, I'll have no problem changing over. Google needs to understand that if people can't find or upload the stuff they want at their place, then they'll go somewhere else's.

Posted:9 months ago

#9

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