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Rumble CEO: Tablets will be the clear winner of the console war

Rumble CEO: Tablets will be the clear winner of the console war

Tue 29 Oct 2013 11:45am GMT / 7:45am EDT / 4:45am PDT
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Nexon invests in Rumble Entertainment as it closes a $17.5 million second round of funding.

Nexon

- Specialized in developing, publishing and servicing online games

- Games in service: 17 unique games...

company.nexon.com/en...

Publisher and developer Rumble Entertainment has announced the close of a Series B round of financing totalling $17.5 million. This round was led by free-to-play publisher Nexon, with additional participation from TriplePoint Capital, Google Ventures, and Khosla Ventures. This brings Rumble's total funding to over $35 million.

GamesIndustry International spoke with Rumble founder and CEO Greg Richardson about the company's new investor and how it plans to utilize that funding. We began by asking Richardson what potential he believes Nexon sees in Rumble.

"What they saw in us was a company that was philosophically aligned: at the end of the day, it comes down to building better games," he replied. "For them, that meant games that were more immersive, with 3D, synchronous multiplayer, and fast action. That's not something you see anyone in the West doing. I also think they saw our approach to monetization, built towards long-term retention, instead of quickly extracting as many dollars as possible from player's wallets."

"They realize what makes these things sustainable hits is people playing them for more than a year or two. If you look at their company and where they've been successful - games like Dungeon Fighter and Maple Story - those games have been around forever. Years and years at high player counts."

01

Rumble CEO Greg Richardson

Rumble currently has three titles in development or open beta: KingsRoad, Ballistic, and Nightmare Guardians. KingsRoad is currently in open beta, while the other two are only accepting beta sign ups. Richardson said the funding allows Rumble to be "thoughtfully patient" with all three titles, instead of rushing them to market.

"Being the pioneers of pushing game quality and fun over the business side of free-to-play games, one of the realizations we had is you have to be patient," he explained. "You need a lot of iteration with your product to get it just right. We are constantly looking for great new content. We do have a publishing platform that supports high-scale synchronous multiplayer on the back-end and a bunch of services from registration, to guilds, and leaderboards, so developers can focus on building great games. We'll put some of the money into finding games as high-quality as Ballistic is."

The company will also be using the funding for market expansion, bringing KingsRoad to tablets in the "early part of 2014" and localizing the game for other regions.

"The thing about KingsRoad is we're in open beta, primarily on Facebook, and we've got around a million people playing the game every month," said Richardson. "Our average user spends an hour a day in the game. We get 90 percent of our installs organically, through word of mouth. With all of our games, we have aspirations to be global, cross-device, and cross-channel. Some of this money will allow us to make sure we're reaching every single gamer out there."

"When we were back in the console world, there were a couple of countries: Japan, North America, Europe, and that's it," he added. "Now we can reach those who could never afford a $300 box or $60 piece of software, but are as every bit as rabid about AAA as the folks in the West are. And frankly, they're in growth economies, where they've got disposable income to spend if they fall in love with a game. That includes Russia, the Middle East, China, and Korea; all of those markets are our potential target. It's a matter of making sure you're out there and have great partners to help you."

03

For Rumble Entertainment, the relationship with Nexon doesn't just bring funding, it also brings knowledge. Nexon is a global leader in the free-to-play market and Rumble can learn a lot from its new investor.

"The Nexon guys basically invented the notion of free-to-play microtransactions," said Richardson. "They've been at it for more than a decade. They have leverage and wisdom when it comes to the differences between packaged goods and games-as-a-service. They've been so open and so product-driven that they want to have those discussions with our product people. It wasn't a press release that attracted Nexon, it was playing KingsRoad. Our relationship with them is a lot less investor/entrepreneur and a lot more two companies that are focused on great products."

Richardson said that "you never know what the future's going to bring," when asked about the Nexon/Rumble partnership becoming more concrete, but played down the idea that Nexon would ever acquire Rumble.

"We very much like being an independent company and we set out with big ambitions. I think the nature of the relationship will probably continue in the vein that it started"

"They obviously know some of the Asian markets far better than we do. We think we're more focused on innovating around tablets and phones and they've been traditionally strong in the client world. So I think there's some synergy there," he added. "We very much like being an independent company and we set out with big ambitions. I think the nature of the relationship will probably continue in the vein that it started."

Rumble is also a publisher, with one of its titles, Ballistic, coming from Brazilian developer Aquiris Game Studios. The road to self-publishing is far easier for independent developers in the mobile market, but Richardson said that Rumble still has more to offer, including development capital.

"The kinds of games that we believe are going to be the pillars of this business over the next three years, they require a lot of money," he said. "Second, the vast majority of people that create AAA games are brand-new to the free-to-play world. They haven't thought of games-as-a-service. They haven't thought about high-scale concurrent users, synchronous multiplayer, and all of the different pieces that come into play in order to operate these things 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. We've built that platform."

"Doesn't matter if it's Unity, Flash, or Unreal; we're agnostic on the client, but we'll output to all the different channels and devices. We'll provide you with all the scaling back-end, payments, customer support, and even things like marketing and user acquisition. Game developers can focus on creating the best possible moment-to-moment experience for their players. We can help them everywhere else."

02

The Rumble team is comprised of veterans from console and PC developers like Activision, Bioware, Blizzard, and Electronic Arts. Richardson said that it's been a hard shift developing robust games for social and mobile platforms with high iteration. He likened the packaged good method to "building motion pictures," with a large number of people toiling for years and then releasing a final product. Instead, Rumble wants to make games that improve and become a day-to-day part of a player's life. Richardson said he wants Rumble's games to be like softball for players: with games, discussion over beers, trophies, and a sense of family.

"That changes the way you have to think about your game design and it changes the way you have to think about monetizing," he explained. "For the big packaged goods guys that have made and will continue to make billions of dollars off of $60 retail items... they're in for a very rude awakening as they make that transition. It's a very difficult one to make even if you're a smaller company focused on it exclusively."

"When you think about the next consoles and who's going to be successful in the console war, I think the winner is clearly tablets"

Rumble's mobile push comes at a time when tablets are becoming increasingly powerful and the same internals are being used to power cheap microconsoles which could end up in living rooms everywhere. Richardson is excited about the possibilities created by the growing mobile device market.

"The increasing power and flexibility of all these mobile devices is incredible," he said. "When you think about the next consoles and who's going to be successful in the console war, I think the winner is clearly tablets. The graphic fidelity, the ability to play with anybody on Android or iOS, the ability to carry these things with you wherever you are, and the fundamental use case which allows users to spend a half-hour to an hour playing at a time... all that is really a great match for the kinds of products we're building."

"It's not just the underlying power of the chipsets that's driving this. The increasing flexibility, where we're seeing these things output to television screens with connected game controllers? That's really cool stuff. The games we're making leverage those experiences to the fullest."

34 Comments

Popular Comment
"...people that create AAA games are brand-new to the free-to-play world. They haven't thought of games-as-a-service". We've been hearing this "factoid" from investor-backed start-ups for years and worthy as it is, if you're the 24,867th developer to say it, it doesn't put you ahead of the pack to think it. Why is your game the best in the world? Surely more inspiring & interesting & relevant to hear.

Posted:9 months ago

#1

Bruce Everiss
Marketing Consultant

1,692 594 0.4
The headline is what I have been saying for a long time now.

Posted:9 months ago

#2

Adam Campbell
Associate Producer

1,148 928 0.8
Popular Comment
Maybe, if they were consoles...

Posted:9 months ago

#3

Doug McFarlane
Co-Owner

39 36 0.9
It is inevitable. There will soon come a point where the selection and low price of Android (for example) games, and the low cost of Android hardware, will sway enough console users to tablets (assuming minimum multi-player w/ HDMI out), that creating AAA games and consoles will not be profitable or sustainable. Sure, there will always be people wanting the latest and greatest games and hardware, but at some point there won't be enough demand to continue with this business model. Specialized industries will still need high-end graphics, so that may still drive the r&d. Time will tell.

Posted:9 months ago

#4

Justin Biddle
Software Developer

156 477 3.1
Forgive me for saying this but they are a mobile game company therefore they are bound to say this. It's like a politician saying that their party will definitely win the next election. Doesn't mean they won't turn out to be right but certainly doesn't mean they are correct either. I would be just as skeptical of Sony or Microsoft claiming the opposite

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Justin Biddle on 30th October 2013 10:09am

Posted:9 months ago

#5

Jed Ashforth
Senior Game Designer, Immersive Technology Group

106 178 1.7
Popular Comment
@Bruce Yes you have Bruce ... and we're all still waiting to see it happen!

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Jed Ashforth on 29th October 2013 5:52pm

Posted:9 months ago

#6

Greg Wilcox
Creator, Destroy All Fanboys!

2,152 1,068 0.5
Nope. nope nope nopeity nope nope. Shutting out those millions of users who still can't access digital content on a regular basis isn't going to be the future of anything but articles saying users are getting bored with the lack of variety in these sorts of games (despite millions of them being available, more than on every console ever) and the confusing manner in which they're displayed in some digital stores. Consoles of some sort will continue to sell at least to those who want gaming on their own terms and not a TOS saying sign this, pay that and shut up, you're gaming now, buster...

That and in the case of disc-based gaming/movies, according to my pal here I'm about to kick out of the home office because he nearly made me shoot some hot coffee out of my nose when he said "But you need at least ONE free hand for watching porn!"

That said, it'll be a sad day indeed when choice goes the way of convenience and exclusives are limited to what one can do as far as customizing his or her device. Hollow victory at best, but let time and the consumer decide. Enforced evolution never quite works out the way it's planned because it's usually only a five year plan at best and doesn't take into account buyer's remorse...

Posted:9 months ago

#7

Andrew Jakobs
Lead Programmer

229 88 0.4
BS.. Tablets will be A device on which people will play games, but the controls are really crap on regular tablets and most people like to game on an actual large screen.. I personally hate playing FPS games on tablets, as it's just utter crap..
But ofcourse the man says tablets will be the clear winner, it's their market... What I personally think is that smart-tv's in the end will be the winners (over regular consoles)..

Also, I wonder how the RSI will fare in a longer run, as I already notice my arms and wrist are already acking after using the tablet for a while (they are far from ergonomically safe)..

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Andrew Jakobs on 29th October 2013 8:07pm

Posted:9 months ago

#8

Yannick Boucher
Producer

9 23 2.6
Just like there will (theoretically) come a point where tablets are so powerful, and competition is so stiff, that quality will reach AAA levels, and budgets will start going up and up, and the gap between "console" and "tablet/mobile" will be narrower than ever.

You can say throw the words "console" or "tablet" around all you want, it's still fundamentally a Core vs. Casual debate. As Pachter put it so well recently, mobile devices have picked up where the Wii left, more than anything else, And the current console numbers being stable-to-slightly-downwards are just as much the result of this as they are of the post-2008 economic situation. And I'm not even talking about business models here yet!

Posted:9 months ago

#9

Paul Jace
Merchandiser

894 1,320 1.5
Counterpoint: Consoles will be the clear winner in the tablet war.

Posted:9 months ago

#10

Rick Lopez
Illustrator, Graphic Designer

1,269 941 0.7
@Doug McFarlane
It is inevitable. There will soon come a point where the selection and low price of Android (for example) games, and the low cost of Android hardware, will sway enough console users to tablets (assuming minimum multi-player w/ HDMI out)
When it comes to this, people will probably own a console and a tablet :)

Posted:9 months ago

#11

Carlos Bordeu
Game Designer / Studio Co-Founder

61 82 1.3
@Yannick Boucher: I disagree that a tablet can be a console because I don't understand why no one seems to point out the obvious difference between them being the controls, and not the graphics or processing power. What makes the tablets a casual gaming platform is that you can't play 90% of core-designed games with touch controls. The graphics are irrelevant. No core gamer is going to play a God of War, Call of Duty, Grand Theft Auto or any complex game swiping his finger against a screen.

All the most popular (core) game genres can't be properly done on tablets no matter how many gigaflops they cram into them. You will not convince people to move away from consoles if they cannot experience their games at the level and complexity that can only be provided by dedicated gaming hardware (controllers) ...unless Apple or Google start designing their tablets like WiiU gamepads.

*** Separate/3rd party game controllers for tablets don't solve the problem: No game designer can design his title exclusively for those and will always be limited to the restrictions of a touch based experience.

Posted:9 months ago

#12

Alfonso Sexto
Lead Tester

782 588 0.8
@Bruce

Yes, and for a long time we told you: They are separate markets.

Posted:9 months ago

#13

Andrew Watson
Programmer

92 200 2.2
Why not both?

Posted:9 months ago

#14

Justin Biddle
Software Developer

156 477 3.1
Why not both? Heaven forbid. Bruce really struggles with concepts that aren't zero sum. As do many of these mobile developers who keep saying consoles are dead. Which really makes me wonder. If it is so obviously over for consoles why do they need to keep loudly shouting about it. It's almost as though they are worried that the general public don't believe them. Which is ridiculous. Consoles certainly aren't a threat to them that they should feel the need to make it look as though their days are numbered. Both can survive side by side. It's telling that you don't hear console game makers constantly attacking tablet and mobile games. Perhaps one feels more secure about their market position than the other.

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Justin Biddle on 30th October 2013 10:13am

Posted:9 months ago

#15

Bruce Everiss
Marketing Consultant

1,692 594 0.4
@ Alfonso
Yes, and for a long time we told you: They are separate markets.
They aren't. There is plenty of evidence that ex console gamers now spend much time playing smartphone and tablet games.

But the killer for consoles is the huge critical mass that their business model requires. Already the market decline since 2008 has killed off most mid market console games, some console publishers and many console developers. This will get a lot worse as there is no way the XB1 and PS4 will sell anywhere near as many units as their predecessors. There is far less reason for the average person to buy one.

Posted:9 months ago

#16

Yannick Boucher
Producer

9 23 2.6
@Carlos I'm talking Best Case Scenario here. Of course I am aware of all the points you mention as well.

@Bruce: where's your hard data that says "ex-console gamers" have jumped onto mobile? I just said it, Pachter mentioned it too, the people who jumped from Wii to tablets are the ones. They're not the market targeted by traditional consoles anyways. The market may have shrunk solely on the basis of the Wii's collapse (or should I say, "had bubbled up purely on the Wii's existence"?). If only you could back up your statements with actual cross-referenced data (no "total number of mobile devices out there", or "total revenue from every app ever produced", but actually useful data).

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Yannick Boucher on 30th October 2013 12:29pm

Posted:9 months ago

#17

Christian Slater
DevilBliss Games Consultancy

23 43 1.9
Re: Tablet touch controls. Don't the better tablets let you bluetooth a joypad controller to 'em?

Surely logic dictates though that the necessarily smaller form factor of a tablet will always see a bigger physical-scale console leapfrogging them in raw oomph before too long even when they do catch up in terms of power (which still hasn't really happened with PS3 / X360 vs. current tablets, I'd hazard).

Posted:9 months ago

#18

Sandy Lobban
Founder and Creative Director

313 200 0.6
It doesn't matter where the numbers are getting crunched to play back a movie or music these days. Therefore, there is no reason we can't expect to see the same for games in my opinion. With wireless connection to bigger screens and wireless controllers, is anyone seriously suggesting that you couldn't make an FPS that is sold in lets say the apple app store, bought via a touch device with the intention that it's best played on a bigger screen with a controller? Entirely possible and I tend to agree that this is where the hardware innovations will take place in the next few years. It's far more likely and far easier for tablet and phone based content to transition to big screens than it is for console games to be played on mobile devices. As these devices get faster the opportunity is there to increase the quality of the content as well.

Personally would love to see steam on some sort of tablet from which I could play in big picture mode or explore some mobile games from the same device.

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Sandy Lobban on 30th October 2013 12:31pm

Posted:9 months ago

#19

Carlos Bordeu
Game Designer / Studio Co-Founder

61 82 1.3
@Bruce

"They aren't. There is plenty of evidence that ex console gamers now spend much time playing smartphone and tablet games."

Do we have any evidence that so many gamers are moving away from consoles to smartphones/tablets and that this is the reason for the market decline? I seriously doubt. The market decline can be attributed to several other factors which have been repeated here numerous times. Smartphones/tablets cannot offer the gaming experiences that consoles can, and until they can they are a separate market.

Whether or not the PS4 and XB1 sell as much as their predecessors does not change whether or not mobile gaming and console gaming are the same market or not.

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Carlos Bordeu on 30th October 2013 12:48pm

Posted:9 months ago

#20

Carlos Bordeu
Game Designer / Studio Co-Founder

61 82 1.3
@Christian Slater

But have we seen core mobile games designed specifically to use with controller / joypads? Mobile games are still designed to be playable on touch (even if they have controller support) which is a huge compromise in the type of gameplay you can aim for if you are trying to emulate a console experience.

Maybe in the future joypads / controllers will be a regular thing for mobile devices and AAA projects will be created exclusively for them. But when that happens mobiles will be consoles, and we will call that console gaming.

Posted:9 months ago

#21

Paul Johnson
Managing Director / Lead code monkey

808 1,009 1.2
What I'm more interested in is why they need tens of millions to pull this off.

With our latest Combat Monsters we've done all they talk about on a self funded budget of about a thirtieth of what they seem to need, with a team of five. Our graphics don't look as good as theirs, but that's mainly through choice due to device frag - we could've made them top notch for not much more at a cost of diminishing our audience.

Posted:9 months ago

#22

Alfonso Sexto
Lead Tester

782 588 0.8
@Bruce Everiss

"They aren't. There is plenty of evidence that ex console gamers now spend much time playing smartphone and tablet games."

Show that evidence, please... meanwhile (as a PC and console gamer) I will tell you that Tablets and smartphones offer no "GTAV", No "FIFA", no "Tales of Xillia", no "XCOM Enemy Unknown", no "World of Warcraft", no "Assassins Creed", no "Journey", no "Street Fighter IV". They only offer a small fix against boredom while you are on the bus or metro... and I think that is exactly where the problem of your affirmation is: You believe that console gamers now ONLY play tablets and smartphones, but the truth is that, those who do (most of the ones I know) never stopped playing consoles.

"Already the market decline since 2008 has killed off most mid market console games, some console publishers and many console developers. This will get a lot worse as there is no way the XB1 and PS4 will sell anywhere near as many units as their predecessors."

PS3 and 360 still sell around 100.00 units each month (And nope, we are not buying that those 100k are all replacements). Studios come and go, but you forget the fact that we had a big recession in Europe (to begin with) and the fact that a lot of shops already displayed the "sold out" when it comes to console pre-orders. This is something you can't call "made up" because MS and Sony can say whatever they want, but amazon or best buy would never willingly stop selling stuff.

The only thing you should listen to is the facts. You gave your back to console market out of hate for them (something that I still don't get, honestly). Answer to this questions, please.

Why is that so many tablet and phone games are now in steam's Greenlight?
Why GTA V shipped 29 million copies in 6 weeks?
Why are companies now preparing to release their steam games on PS4? (also on XONE, but a bit less)
Why are you so obsessed with consoles disappearing and the big "uprise" of tablets and smartphones?
Why are so many clone games on tablets and smartphones if the intention is other than making a quick cash-in and not caring about creativity?

Nothing else to say.

Note: no YYSSW in this article, Bruce?

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Alfonso Sexto on 31st October 2013 9:31am

Posted:9 months ago

#23

Bruce Everiss
Marketing Consultant

1,692 594 0.4
@ Alfonso Sexto

There is no doubt that people are playing games a lot on mobile devices INSTEAD of on consoles. This is why consoles are in such sharp decline.

http://yougov.co.uk/news/2013/09/05/phones-and-tablets-now-outstrip-consoles-gaming/

Frequency of playing is also much more pronounced on tablets and smartphones. Of people who play games, nearly half (49%) say they play games on their tablet on a daily basis with an equal number doing the same on their smartphones. This is compared to other gaming devices, where 14% play daily on their Xbox 360, 8% on their PS3, 3% on their Wii and 38% on their laptop.

Additionally, more than one in five (21%) who game on their smartphone but predominantly on their consoles stated that they felt they have bought fewer games as a results of owning a smartphone. This is higher amongst tablet owners where nearly a third (28%) said the same.

http://www.gamespot.com/articles/tablet-owners-gaming-less-on-consoles-study/1100-6338749/

Now, a survey conducted by market research company GfK has revealed that the majority of tablet owners use gaming consoles and handhelds 59 percent less as a result of owning a tablet.

Posted:9 months ago

#24

Keldon Alleyne
Handheld Developer

431 406 0.9
Now, a survey conducted by market research company GfK has revealed that the majority of tablet owners use gaming consoles and handhelds 59 percent less as a result of owning a tablet.
I'm not even going to bother to explain to Bruce what that really means because his job title says, "Marketing Consultant" so it should be immediately apparent that surveying Tablet owners about the fate of consoles is like only surveying men who only shower about their usage of soap bars.

Posted:9 months ago

#25

Bruce Everiss
Marketing Consultant

1,692 594 0.4
@Keldon Alleyne

I use a soap bar in the shower. Half kilo blocks of Savon de Marseille.

Your comment is both ad hominem and silly.

Posted:9 months ago

#26

Keldon Alleyne
Handheld Developer

431 406 0.9
@Bruce: the point I'm making is that you're taking a data set from group A (tablets) about group B (consoles) and drawing conclusions about how many people have gone from group B to group A by only looking at group A.

My comment about soap was an illustration of that, I should have been more clear, my apologies.

In terms of the other figures, I don't think there are enough. To make real conclusions you need to know where data sets intersect and what statistics are independent of each other. Without knowing those figures it's easy to infer just about anything.

When observing statistics you have to acknowledge the core principles of calculus otherwise it's easy to reach incorrect conclusions.

Edited 3 times. Last edit by Keldon Alleyne on 31st October 2013 10:58am

Posted:9 months ago

#27

Bruce Everiss
Marketing Consultant

1,692 594 0.4
@Keldon Alleyne

Go to Google. There is plenty of research on this.
The fact is that console owners who have smartphones (most of them) now spend less time and money on their console gaming.
The fact is also that console owners with tablets (a very high percentage of them) spend even less time and money on their consoles.
Your group A and group B are largely the same people.
This is why the sales of console games has collapsed in recent years.

Obviously this applies to overall populations and there are individuals who are exceptions.
It is self evident that tablets will become the main mid core and hard core gaming platform. For very many reasons. And with $50 Android tablets the consoles are dead as casual gaming platforms.

The last two major console launches bombed. I cannot see any traditional business model console ever succeeding beyond the early adopters and the must haves. The marginal utility of the devices is just too low. There is no good reason to buy one. All the most played games in the world are already on mobile and their market is still exploding.
When observing statistics you have to acknowledge the core principles of calculus otherwise it's easy to reach incorrect conclusions.
I am glad for this elucidation. When I had my formal training in calculus and statistics they were taught as separate disciplines.

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Bruce Everiss on 31st October 2013 11:22am

Posted:9 months ago

#28

Jim Webb
Executive Editor/Community Director

2,242 2,206 1.0
Bruce, the sale of console games fell because the Wii fell. If console games collapsed overall, then how do you explain how the PS3 and X360 gain greater software sales year over year and with an increase in attach rate?

Stop associating the transition from Wii to tablets/mobile as an indicator to the entire console industry.

Has the video game industry expanded to include new markets and new devices? Yes.
Has the Wii market transitioned to ubiquitous devices? Yes.
Has the console market transitioned to ubiquitous devices? No.

Can and do both markets co-exist? Yes.

Why are you the only guy here that cannot grasp this?

Posted:9 months ago

#29

Justin Biddle
Software Developer

156 477 3.1
Because it doesn't fit the world his mind lives in. The link below shows how although the console market declined since 2008 this was because of the Wii whereas xbox 360 and ps3 continuted to grow until 2011 until they started a perfectly natural end of generation drop off. In fact the charts comparing to previous generation cycles are remarkably similar.

http://ignorethecode.net/blog/2013/09/13/the_videogame_sales_cycle/

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Justin Biddle on 31st October 2013 11:32am

Posted:9 months ago

#30

Keldon Alleyne
Handheld Developer

431 406 0.9
I am glad for this elucidation. When I had my formal training in calculus and statistics they were taught as separate disciplines.
I mistyped that a little, what would have better fitted my thoughts would be: when dealing with statistical results from surveys you need to acknowledge the core principles of probability theory, namely conditional probability in this case (and just thinking about the whole picture in general).

I feel that your stance in general ignores the different data groups. For example, how many of those tablet gamers have played nothing but the Wii? A loss of Wii exclusive gamers would say very little, but there has been absolutely no effort to discern what is actually happening. There are far too many relevant unknowns.

In fact does not the fact that most console gamers own a smart phone or a tablet suggest that both markets can happily thrive? Some games are better suited for tablets so they will see their sales there. Some games are better suited for consoles, so they will see their sales there. Some game concepts just do not translate well to tablets. And that aside, console gaming has too much traction.

Give it another generation or two at least and maybe you will see a change in attitudes. But it is those attitudes towards consoles that keep it relevant.

Who knows, perhaps console gaming will become irrelevant for the most part in some distant future. But I've not seen any reason to believe the time is now. Just ask R* or EA.

I have consulted Google, and there are lots of figures, but not enough that can allow for your conclusions. How about sharing your console hardware sale projections for the PS4 and XBone. I'd be curious to see how they compare to the reality. That and the consumer response to the Wii-U when the core Nintendo franchises arrive.

I don't expect the Wii-U to be any more successful than the N64 was and I'd be surprised if it sells as much as the GC, but I do expect it to have some value in it's original games.

As for Sony/MS, I don't know what to expect, good games and Sky Player does it for me.

Posted:9 months ago

#31

Keldon Alleyne
Handheld Developer

431 406 0.9
@Justin: spot on. That is what we've been talking about all along.

Posted:9 months ago

#32

Bruce Everiss
Marketing Consultant

1,692 594 0.4
Another excellent article analysing what people are and will play games on and why: http://techland.time.com/2013/09/10/a-sobering-look-at-mobiles-impact-on-console-and-handheld-gaming/

Posted:9 months ago

#33

Jim Webb
Executive Editor/Community Director

2,242 2,206 1.0
Bruce, I just read his article. his summary is basically what we've all been saying. DS and Wii dropped off and the Wii U hasn't been able to fill that gap while the X360 and PS3 are chugging along just fine with the arrivals of their successors coming this year. He agrees that the PS3 and X360 are not growing the market any further but you can't claim the market is dead simply because it has stagnant growth. That just means you've reach saturation. Which mobile will also one day reach.

Posted:9 months ago

#34

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