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Siobhan Reddy: Girls, Games and GTA

Siobhan Reddy: Girls, Games and GTA

Wed 09 Oct 2013 10:25am GMT / 6:25am EDT / 3:25am PDT
Developer

"I wouldn't work in a band making music I hated with people that I thought were horrible"

Media Molecule

Media Molecule was founded by a small troupe of Lionhead veterans who, bolstered by their work together...

mediamolecule.com

Siobhan Reddy might be from Media Molecule, but like everyone in the gaming world when she sits down with GamesIndustry International the conversation somehow drifts onto the topic of Grand Theft Auto V.

"I think GTA is GTA, it's an amazingly huge incredible achievement from that team, I would have loved there to be a female character but maybe there will be one? And I would rather they spend the time getting something right than just changing the skin," she says.

"I think it would be really fascinating to see them create a deeply flawed and amazing woman - I don't know what her character would be - but I'd love to see it because I think they are a really really incredible studio."

"But they don't have to though, that's the thing. They just don't have to, and they could just choose to do that forever and we'd all be like that's a shame, but they don't actually have too. But they're so influential it would be really great."

The lack of a female character (who isn't a whore, drunk or stripper) in one of the year's biggest titles is a fitting topic of discussion given that Reddy has just given her keynote speech at the Women In Games conference in London, where she spoke about the responsibility of women in the industry to stand up and be heard, and to make a difference by changing games they're unhappy with, or not working on them at all.

1

"I think that we have a choice. It's like the band analogy, and it's like I wouldn't work in a band making music I hated with people that I thought were horrible. Because you just have to take too many leaps of faith," she says.

"I do know that we who make games have choices, and that we make creative decisions every single day, thousands every day in a team, and I would love to get people within teams, both men and women. It's not just about women. And there's so many games that get that right, and there are so many games doing it which are really good, but then there are some that just do it so poorly."

Reddy made her own stand at Media Molecule. It's not a studio you would expect to think struggled with issues of sexism any more than you'd expect Santa Claus to have a crack habit, but Reddy says questioning everything is important. Including why the lead character in the studio's latest game, Tearaway, was automatically designed as male.

After some discussion with the team and some concept art gender reassignment, players can now choose from two main characters, Iota and Atoi. Reddy thinks more women can make changes like this, if they can just find the confidence to stand up.

"I don't work with anyone who was making any decisions based on being sexist, but they immediately felt that that's what I was saying," she explains.

"And I'm a big believer that if someone had come back and said, 'You know what? This is the story of Iota, this is why it is a male story', then I would have been like okay, that's cool. But we can't just walk into it without saying why didn't we choose to draw a female character? Is it just because we drew a picture? We should at least question it."

And when she did question it she found that, like most of us, artists draw on their own experiences, and their experience just happened to be being a dude.

Reddy is also trying to influence the games industry for the better in a wider context, talking at Women In Games, working with BAFTA's Games Committee and collaborating with Belinda Parmar of Lady Geek to help encourage young women to explore careers in technology.

"There are a lot of women who are here today who are all people trying to instrument big changes, in terms of perception issues or education or actually actively getting out there and exposing young girls to technology and games," she says of Women In Games, name checking Parmar and Marie Claire Isaaman of Norwich University.

"When I was looking around I was really impressed by that. Because I think what has become clear to me is that there are a lot of women who are influential, who want to do things, but actually we all just need to meet each other."

"What has become clear to me is that there are a lot of women who are influential, who want to do things, but actually we all just need to meet each other"

The decision to become more involved in helping other women in the games industry has been a fairly recent one for Reddy, but probably not an unexpected one given her riot grrl past and a brilliant sounding feminist mother. For her getting involved was about confidence, and overcoming her nerves when it comes to public speaking.

"I'm on the GDC Advisory Board and so Meggan [Scavio] asked me to be a part of that a few years ago, which is an amazing honour. So that was one thing, I just started to do more of that, I've done a producer boot camp and I did a talk last year and I realised it's my own nerves. Everyone has them, and they shouldn't be really debilitating," she smiles.

Asked if she thought there was a culture of female developers and executives being uncomfortable about putting themselves forward when it came to promoting games, she has mixed feelings.

"I think that's very real... I find that I don't talk externally for the studio for two reasons. One is I believe that when it comes to talking about our games I'm not the creative director or the designer," she explains.

"And it's so easy to say Alex [Evans] and Mark [Healey] and Kareem [Ettouney] are so amazing, they're so good at it. Alex is so comfortable on stage that sometimes you just put the best person forward. And what I've learnt is that that's fine in that context but when there are events like today or I'm doing a talk at GDC or if there are events where I am actually the best person for it and I'm choosing to put someone else forward, that's wrong."

She says people at the studio find it strange to think she might suffer from nerves, and in person it's easy to see why. To use the words of a 50 year-old advertising executive she's feisty and forthright, and you get the sense that she's very used to managing Media Molecule's mix of characters, dogs and occasionally small children.

"We've always wanted somewhere where people who have kids can actually continue to work, rather than having children and then having to go somewhere else. And that environment has been important in being flexible."

"Do we want to have dogs in the office? Well I have a dog, so yes! Are we going to have children in the office? Well, people have kids and we want them to come in! I've always liked the idea of the family thing."

In some ways Media Molecule sounds like a bit of a wonderland for developers, late nights are rare, the vibe is one of creativity and collaboration rather than crunch periods and Mountain Dew addictions.

2

"I think we just have a really great team actually. And there's so many different types of people. When I look at LittleBigPlanet and Tearaway - they might seem really different but they share creative gaming - everybody there is united around the idea of making things and then making games which are about making things."

Add to that a shared sense of humour, "the best medicine in a crisis" a good respect level even when things are getting a bit shouty and a team of not one, not two, but five directors, and you have at least part of the Media Molecule recipe for success mapped out. Success that means LittleBigPlanet, the studio's first game, is still going strong, and has impacted the studio beyond sales figures and awards.

"We've hired like a third of our company from the community. It's probably not a third now, but at one point it was a third of people came from LBP," says Reddy.

"With both LBP and Tearaway the game has a life outside of just 'the game.' One of the new things people have had to get used to in game design or think about in game design, is the world of what your making no longer just finishes. It never finishes, ever. I remember with LBP just thinking, when do we ever go on holiday? Because you're just basically constantly working with customer support and community management and all the emails."

"The positivity you get fuels everybody wanting to do more."

Tearaway is due for release on November 22 on PlayStation Vita, and the team currently has an unannounced PlayStation 4 project in the works.

28 Comments

Mario Tommadich
Technical Requirements & Compliance

31 28 0.9
Popular Comment
Why do people even care if the main character in a game is male or female? It shouldn't matter as long as the game plays well and has an immersive story. Isn't the very core of being "sexist" that one constantly has to differentiate between male/female/undecided rather than backing off from the topic and just letting a game being a game rather than a publicist instrument?

Posted:10 months ago

#1
Popular Comment
@Mario Says...a bloke. ;)

Edited 1 times. Last edit by David Newman on 9th October 2013 5:35pm

Posted:10 months ago

#2

Edward Buffery
Pre-production Manager

148 96 0.6
Popular Comment
There are tons of reasons why people might care about the gender of a main character. Some players want to relate to the main character as much as possible, so prefer playing the same gender. Other people are more interested in games (or entertainment media in general) as a way to experience things that the viewer couldn't, so a main character of a different gender (or age / race / etc) provides a more interesting experience. Some people like looking at whichever gender they are more attracted to. Some people like seeing stereotypes being challenged, broken, or re-enforced. Some people look for same-gender role models to take inspiration from.

I could go on but the point is that because there are actually a lot of reasons why the main character's gender might make a difference to the user experience. As Siobhan stated, she's fine with characters being male if that was a decision following a thought process and actual reasons are involved. However, more often than not, designing a game character as male is merely the default setting and doesn't necessarily bring any benefit at all, which is a shame. I don't see how considering the impact of a character's gender and / or offering a choice is sexist in any way.

Posted:10 months ago

#3

Del Hartin
Senior Designer

9 24 2.7
Popular Comment
Media Molecule really do seem to have a good thing going on with regards to their environment. Well done to them.

I like the way they approached the Tearaway character gender choice, not simply for the gender issue but for the thinking about choice itself. Questioning why a choice was made can give you real insight into the design. Did we just make this choice because it was easy? Was this a choice that was initially a placeholder that just got pulled into the full design without any extra thought involved. It's not something that needs to be done JUST for equality but it's something that SHOULD be done to avoid inequality. It will also help you avoid sloppy design decisions.

Posted:10 months ago

#4

John McCann
Designer

2 1 0.5
I assumed that GTA5 doesn't have a female character for technical reasons. ie they couldn't reuse the skeleton & most of the animations from the other main characters; so they'd create a massive amount of extra animation work.

Posted:10 months ago

#5

Bonnie Patterson
Freelance Narrative Designer

158 425 2.7
@John McCann There's an article on here somewhere where they were interviewed about it, and they said they went with all-male lead characters because the story they're telling centres on very masculine themes

Posted:10 months ago

#6

David Serrano
Freelancer

299 270 0.9
@Bonnie Patterson

If their story centered on very masculine themes, why did they make Trevor bi-sexual? Just saying....

Edited 1 times. Last edit by David Serrano on 9th October 2013 8:07pm

Posted:10 months ago

#7

Rick Lopez
Illustrator, Graphic Designer

1,269 941 0.7
Look... I like Media Molecule. I own and have played All little Big Planet titles and am looking foward to Tear away, wether the main character is male or female.

"I wouldn't work in a band making music I hated with people that I thought were horrible"

Well thats everybody regardless of gender... nothing new their... you gotta start somewhere... I remember trying to be part of a band and it was hell, and when I started as a DJ, taking gigs I hated with little or no pay... but I belive that you sometimes have to go through these things in order to reap the benefits later on. Those crappy gigs are the ones that enabled me to get the better ones. It also builds character and makes you wiser. I just think a newbie, regardless of sex, will find the same obsticles and frustrations when starting out in the game industry... So which ones are exclusive to woman? That they feel nobody listens to them? co-workers are jerks to them? fire away...

Oh this artical popped up... regarding mark cerny that might be relevant to what I just said. He states that he had to work on alot of shovelware, before he could get on to working on better projects.

http://www.gamesindustry.biz/articles/2013-10-09-good-old-days-werent-so-good-cerny

Regarding GTA...

Woman in GTA... maybe one day, just not today. I dont think it cant be done or shouldnt be done, in fact I would have wanted a female character, I just think its not what they wanted at the moment and its not relevant to the story they wanted to tell... and just because the game doesnt have one doesnt mean its flawed.

Finally in video games the most important aspect... at least to me... is its gameplay. It needs to be something fun to play. And wether the main character is male or female or if the game is made by men or woman... i really dont give a rats ass. Ill give little big planet, Animal crossing and saints row 4 a go simply because they are fun to play. Same thing with tearaway.

Edited 6 times. Last edit by Rick Lopez on 10th October 2013 12:54pm

Posted:10 months ago

#8

Paul Jace
Merchandiser

896 1,325 1.5
Popular Comment
@David Serrano
If their story centered on very masculine themes, why did they make Trevor bi-sexual? Just saying....
What makes you think a bi-sexual man can't be masculine?

Posted:10 months ago

#9

Bonnie Patterson
Freelance Narrative Designer

158 425 2.7
Ha! Don't ask me, I'm not Rockstar!

At least that's a new facet on the "tough guy" narrative.

Posted:10 months ago

#10

Justin Shuard
J - E translator

42 167 4.0
I would like to see more women in games as much as anyone else, but at the same time I have to admit I don't really care much for the passive aggressive stance a lot of these speakers take.

GTA doesn't need a female protagonist... but it'd be a shame if it didn't include one... Hmmm, GTA either needs to have a female protagonist or doesn't. If it doesn't than it there is no such "shame" in not having one.

Posted:10 months ago

#11

Claire Lop
Studying AIrframe and Powerplant

1 3 3.0
People Care because it's easier for some of us to PLAY either gender. I find it personally difficult to invest myself in a male protagonist usually. Doesn't mean the character is bad or even not superbly written, I just don't connect as well. Exceptions of course are fairly common, Dark Cloud being one such game for me. Dark Cloud 2 was easier to invest in because Monica was in the game. At least for me. Remember all of this is predicated on how well the character is written etc, but I as a general rule find it easier to identify with female characters.

Does that make me inherently sexist towards men? Absolutely not, I just don't connect with the character as well usually. So there are reasons behind why I would rather play a female character, but I don't think it's a problem or the industry as a whole. The problem is not the inherent gender preference of the gamer, it's the fact that people try and spin things to 'be sexist' even when they aren't. Take a look at Saints Row IV. All the characters are equally messed up and pushed just as hard. Horrible things happen to female s in the game, and yet it isn't inherently sexist by nature. It's equally distributed and so you don't hear to much about it. Yet the moment GTAV refuses to put in a female character and objectifies women, boom sexist. Which is a founded concern to some extent, but you needn't get riled up about it. Good to have the discussion not good to flood my feed with people complaining about it.

Yet people will complain, because as I said earlier. Some of us prefer playing XYZ character. It was disappointing when Saints row went away from the slider, to a binary option. It meant I could no longer create ambiguous characters sure, but it wasn't sexist. It was just sort of a minor complaint. It still bothered me, even if it wasn't a "Sexist" issue. So when people say something is sexist, it's just a minor complaint being amplified because lets face it it's the internet. That's what the internet does.

Posted:10 months ago

#12

Adam Campbell
Associate Producer

1,151 931 0.8
@Edward Buffery

Your post made me incredibly happy!
I assumed that GTA5 doesn't have a female character for technical reasons. ie they couldn't reuse the skeleton & most of the animations from the other main characters; so they'd create a massive amount of extra animation work.
Well, that would neither be an issue for the most expensive game of all time nor a game that has a very dynamic animation system.

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Adam Campbell on 9th October 2013 10:48pm

Posted:10 months ago

#13
Feminists are as general rule, sexist pigs tbh, a mere trawl of the internet for feminist posts can quickly reveal this, let alone if you get one in a conversation, the idea of feminism is just as outdated as the sexism it claims to fight, the idea women need to get together only with other women in order to push women's equality is outdated, an example of old thinking, humans tribal nature soon leads to sexism every bit as rampant as the the men of yesteryear, its only natural and to be avoided as a result as nothing good that way lies, the future is equalists a non exclusionary group of men AND women who seek equality, if you call yourself a feminist, your no better then the sexists your claiming to fight against, its outdated, a product of yesteryear, and as often as not as a general rule an expression of your own bias, like a zombie, the front half doesn't yet know the back half is dead. Equality is to be strived for not dominance of either.

As for in games, women do need to step up more, however frankly women players need to step up as every bit as much in order to drive any real change, afterall its a business, without the statistics to backup the demographic, its hard to justify at a publisher level, there are plenty of women who game, there just usually quiet about it to quiet, partly due to the childish nature of online gaming communities mostly because half of the occupants are children, and children far from the angelic percepition are usually both sexist, homophobic, and incredibly tribal.

Posted:10 months ago

#14

Tom Keresztes
Programmer

636 239 0.4
As for in games, women do need to step up more, however frankly women players need to step up ...
Game developers and players are not the same group. Do we want more female developers or more females playing games?

Most statistics about female gamers only cover overall percentage (half of players are females), but not what games they play. One of the researches i've seen a couple years ago that they were the majority in casual games, and a minority in console games. This was before 2007, so smartphones were not taken into account.
Well, that would neither be an issue for the most expensive game of all time nor a game that has a very dynamic animation system.
You seem to know about their animation system than Rockstar. An animation designed for a male model wont look very nice on a female mesh - or do you want girls walk around moving like a boy? That would look cheap. And then there is the issue of lip sync, and not to mention voiceovers. Plus it would double the QA effort, too, as all the game has to be tested with all the characters.

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Tom Keresztes on 10th October 2013 9:24am

Posted:10 months ago

#15

Sandy Lobban
Founder and Creative Director

314 205 0.7
I think it s a fair point on what character someone plays as in a game and being able to choose, but not in every game. If a female character has better attributes for a given task then I'm sure no one would object to playing as her and using her abiities to gain an in game advantage. Made a game before with a bad ass female main character as one of the 4 main characters. In 2003 (State of Emergency 2), so its been happening well before now. There was one girl on the dev team, but Im pretty sure it was proposed by a few of the guys.

Posted:10 months ago

#16
Wow that's quite a strong opinion there Alex. Don't think it belongs here either. Having said that I do think proper research that goes beyond a google search is advisable before stomping a movement to the ground that in its core is all about gender equality and equal opportunities. Nothing more, nothing less.

Posted:10 months ago

#17

Paul Smith
Dev

189 148 0.8
Gender equality goes both ways.

Posted:10 months ago

#18
@Barbara Not sure Alex belongs here either, his company / games / site links seem not to exist on the web.

Posted:10 months ago

#19

Bryan Robertson
Gameplay Programmer

86 210 2.4
I assumed that GTA5 doesn't have a female character for technical reasons. ie they couldn't reuse the skeleton & most of the animations from the other main characters; so they'd create a massive amount of extra animation work.
This is true for a lot of games, it was certainly true for one of the games I worked on in the past (Memory was extremely limited, and I don't think we could have made room in the case where two coop players choose a different gender).

I don't think it's really true in the case of GTA though, since GTA online has female player characters, so all the player animations need to work for both genders. The only exception I could think of off the top of my head would be cutscenes, but in my experience those tend to be mocapped and unique to each character anyway.

Posted:10 months ago

#20

Paul Smith
Dev

189 148 0.8
The reason why GTA5 doesn't have a female character is because there's no logical reason to have one, why change a winning formula?

Posted:10 months ago

#21

Edward Buffery
Pre-production Manager

148 96 0.6
No logical reason other than because a lot of people have said that it could have made the game more interesting. In the entertainment business, I would say that introducing popular new ingredients is actually an important aspect of a winning formula, to keep the fanbase interested and to stay ahead of the copycat competition. GTA V didn't NEED to have a female character as it's remarkably and deservedly successful without it, and no-one can possibly know if they'd have done a good job if they had taken that path so perhaps it was for the better that they didn't. It's certainly interesting to think about though.

Posted:10 months ago

#22

David Serrano
Freelancer

299 270 0.9
@Paul Jace

Bi-sexual and or metrosexual men can be masculine since being so is not only about physical appearance, strength or aggressiveness. It's also about confidence and how you carry yourself. Trevor is an unmasculine character because in addition to being bi-sexual or sexually confused, he doesn't posses the other traits associated with masculinity. He's a physically run down, mentally ill, drug addicted psychopath who's hyper aggression and unrealistic self image are the result of substance abuse and mentally illness... not masculinity. And the character's narrative purpose is not to explore masculine relationships or how the dynamic of bisexually could impact the relationships. Trevor's narrative role is to create conflict for Michael and to provide comic relief.

So I'm just saying the character as written, shoots down RockStar rationalization for having three male characters. Because a female character could have served the same narrative purposes.

Posted:10 months ago

#23

Yvonne Neuland
Studying Game Development

34 59 1.7
Feminists are as general rule, sexist pigs tbh, a mere trawl of the internet for feminist posts can quickly reveal this, let alone if you get one in a conversation, the idea of feminism is just as outdated as the sexism it claims to fight, the idea women need to get together only with other women in order to push women's equality is outdated, an example of old thinking, humans tribal nature soon leads to sexism every bit as rampant as the the men of yesteryear, its only natural and to be avoided as a result as nothing good that way lies, the future is equalists a non exclusionary group of men AND women who seek equality, if you call yourself a feminist, your no better then the sexists your claiming to fight against, its outdated, a product of yesteryear, and as often as not as a general rule an expression of your own bias, like a zombie, the front half doesn't yet know the back half is dead.
When I read comments like this, I have to wonder if the author of them is in any way aware of the possible legal ramifications they might have. Since this website is theoretically a professional website, and the members theoretically are purporting to be representatives of the companies they work for, the comments could very well be used as evidence in a discrimination lawsuit brought by employees and applicants of those companies.



It is unlawful to harass a person because of that person's sex. Harassment can include "sexual harassment" or unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical harassment of a sexual nature.

Harassment does not have to be of a sexual nature, however, and can include offensive remarks about a person's sex. For example, it is illegal to harass a woman by making offensive comments about women in general.

The court case Price Waterhouse v. Hopkins established that sex stereotyping is a form of discrimination on the basis of sex, and the Court found that employment decisions that result from sex stereotypes may violate Title VII.

The courts have recognized two forms of sexual harassment under Title VII. The first is quid pro quo sexual harassment, which occurs when submission to unwelcome sexual advances or other conduct of a sexual nature is made a condition of an individual's employment or is otherwise used as the basis for employment decisions. This type is not generally relevant to posts made on this website.

The second form of harassment involves conduct that has the purpose or effect of interfering unreasonably with an individual's work performance or of creating a hostile or offensive work environment. This second form of sexual harassment, which the Court first recognized as a cognizable claim in Meritor Savings Bank, FSB v Vinson, is referred to as "hostile environment" sexual harassment.

In Burlington Northern and Santa Fe Railway Co. v. White the Supreme Court ruled that the statue's retaliation provision encompasses any employer action that "would have been materially adverse to a reasonable employee or job applicant." This standard makes it easier to sue employers if they retaliate against workers or applicants who complain about discrimination. This means that an employee or applicant may successfully sue an employer for retaliation even if the employer's action does not actually result in an adverse employment action.

Personally, I would rather know what kind of people work for the companies I consider applying to, so I am not actually bothered by the nature of such posts. I find them a valuable source of information, and am not interested in filing gender discrimination lawsuits against companies I wouldn't want to work for anyways due to the unpleasant nature of their employees.

We live in an overly-litigious society, however, and professionally speaking, it would be wise to watch what you say on public forums such as this website. There are plenty of people who would rather make their living off of punitive damages than actual work, and it isn't a good idea to advertise your discriminatory opinions to such individuals.

Many countries have Labor Laws that prohibit discrimination similar to those found in the United States, and it would be wise to take them into consideration before posting.

Edited 3 times. Last edit by Yvonne Neuland on 17th October 2013 6:10am

Posted:10 months ago

#24

Robin Clarke
Producer

300 684 2.3
Google suggests "Xantek Games Studios" isn't an actual company.

I can't be the only person who thinks it's unacceptable for GamesIndustry.biz, which let's not forget is read by a lot of people considering pursuing a career in the games industry, makes seemingly zero effort to vet its posters or moderate comments. Gamasutra and Rock Paper Shotgun (to name but two) avoid their comment threads routinely becoming cesspools of misogynistic idiocy - it's not something that we just have to put up with.

Step up to your responsibilities or switch the comments off, please.

Posted:10 months ago

#25

Keldon Alleyne
Handheld Developer

431 406 0.9
I'm confused as to how Alexander McConnell's post can be deemed as sexist. If I understand correctly he was saying that we should strive for equality but feminist groups that exclude men are the least efficient way to do so and in fact create the very sexism that it aims to create.

He is generalising the concept of an oppressed group seeking equality by excluding those who are not of that group and by doing so become exclusive and therefore just a discriminatory as the oppression they aimed to defeat.

He then goes on to acknowledge female gamers, suggesting that there are more female gamers than we are aware of but we don't hear about them because of the social implications of identifying oneself as an advocate to what may be perceived as a childish occupation, a common theme I have heard from females since the dawn of time.

His mention of women stepping up was only relating to the number of gamers, not suggesting that the current population of female gamers are inferior. And his mention of it is his way of addressing the lack of the industry's efforts to appeal to them, since their small numbers make them less interesting from a profit making perspective.

Unless I'm missing something, of course.

Now I'm not stating agreement of disagreement with his perspective on creating social change, it just looks like he miscommunicated his thoughts little and they've now been blown WAY out of proportion.

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Keldon Alleyne on 17th October 2013 3:00pm

Posted:10 months ago

#26

Tom Keresztes
Programmer

636 239 0.4
Feminists are as general rule, sexist pigs tbh, a mere trawl of the internet for feminist posts can quickly reveal this
Is this the new standard for GI comments?
For example, it is illegal to harass a woman by making offensive comments about women in general.
So I presume its also illegal for feminists to harass men by making offensive comments about men in general? Not every man is a caveman, and i personally find the tone of some (but not all) feminists offensive.

Posted:10 months ago

#27

Edward Buffery
Pre-production Manager

148 96 0.6
If a manager happens to be an outspokenly sexist woman then yes, as her male employee you could take legal action in some countries. Whether or not she is also a feminist is irrelevant. I've never actually heard of it happening that way round, but there are always exceptions if you look hard enough. Also, feminism is not the exclusively female cause that it used to be. I know almost as many male feminists as female ones. There's nothing offensive or unmanly about them, just decent blokes who believe strongly enough in gender equality to fight misogyny when they see it. Being a feminist does not require being sexist against men, though there are sexist women who try and hide behind the label of feminism and give the whole thing a bad name. I'm hardly an authority on the matter but that's my 5 cents anyway...

Posted:10 months ago

#28

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