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Daring Options for Nintendo

Daring Options for Nintendo

Thu 03 Oct 2013 7:45pm GMT / 3:45pm EDT / 12:45pm PDT
BusinessHardware

Should Nintendo consider selling a Wii U package for cheap without the Gamepad tablet controller?

Recently Nintendo released two key bits of information about its future. The first was that production of the Wii in Japan is halting, and the second is that Donkey Kong Country: Tropical Freeze will be delayed into February of 2014 from its original December 2013 ship date. Now, it's true the Wii is still being produced for other regions, and that a couple of months delay for a game is hardly unusual. Still, these are disturbing signs that all is not well with Nintendo, and it may be time to look to more daring solutions than just releasing hardware in a new color.

The hardware situation for Nintendo is not encouraging. The Wii U has fallen flat since the initial flurry of enthusiasm, and sales have yet to reach significant levels even with the price cut to $299. The Wii is slowing down so much that Nintendo is giving up on it in Japan, and other regions are probably not far behind. Most households now have an HDTV, and they want a console that gives them HD graphics.

The 3DS is a bright spot, but with every month the pressure on it from smartphones and tablets increases. Take a look at a typical smartphone screen, and compare it side-by-side to a 3DS. Even with revered brands from the past, the 3DS is just not competitive on a hardware level.

The Wii U is suffering in comparison to not just the PS4 and the Xbox One, which are obviously capable of far better graphics and have dozens of titles coming, but even to the PS3 and the Xbox 360. Looking at a PS3 or an Xbox 360 and the titles available this holiday for them, the average consumer will easily choose them over a Wii U - and save some money in the bargain. How can Nintendo regain an edge?

Continue to our sister site the [a]list daily to read the whole opinion piece.

26 Comments

Patrick Frost QA Project Monitor

400 196 0.5
Popular Comment
Wow.... I thought we'd got over this hardware penis measuring contest for predicting how well consoles are going to do.

Whilst I agree that the Wii U is at a competitive disadvantage, let me answer the question at the end of this article: How can Nintendo regain an edge?

The don't need to because their consoles will have Nintendo games on them and the impact of that fact is not changing any time soon.
And what you've said about the 3DS is just completely irrelevant to it's appeal as a device. Do smartphones have Animal Crossing, Mario Kart, full fledged Resident Evil games and Monster Hunter? Of course not so talking about screens if frankly bullshit.

Worst piece of writing I've read on here in a while.

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Patrick Frost on 3rd October 2013 9:42pm

Posted:A year ago

#1

Yiannis Koumoutzelis Founder & Creative Director, Neriad Games

363 207 0.6
Popular Comment
Sorry but this article really misses the point.


How do you get from that to this? :
The hardware situation for Nintendo is not encouraging.
The 3DS is not just a bright spot, it is a beacon of light which clearly shows that specialized game handhelds can do AMAZINGLY well despite the wide spread of the mobile platform.

Posted:A year ago

#2

Cale Barnett Animator

29 31 1.1
Well considering that Nintendo are now releasing a 3DS without the unnecessary gimmick (2DS), maybe they will release a Wii U without the tablet. Because at this point the tablet is still just a gimmick, a nice option but not a game-changer.
I imagine there would be plenty of potential customers wanting to play Super Mario 3D World or Pikmin 3, but who cannot justify the price of a Wii U when that is all they want it for.

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Cale Barnett on 3rd October 2013 11:20pm

Posted:A year ago

#3

Jeff Kleist Writer, Marketing, Licensing

358 215 0.6
@Christian In Japan, Sharp, and I believe several other manufacturers make 3D phones. Samsung released one, though I don't believe it proved popular. So they are available, just not widespread on the global market. On a screen so small, 3D isn't a very compelling feature, and that's speaking as a big-time 3D advocate.

The real problem with comparing the 3DS with other things is that it has a unique factor to it:Virtually zero competition.The PSP and now the Vita are barely a blip anywhere but Japan. A situation that if Apple ever decides to get serious is going to put them in a huge amount of trouble

Nintendo would be a fool to sell the WiiU without the pad, it's even more inseperable than Kinect from X1. It also would have the problem of cementing consumer confusion between it and the origianl. What Nintendo Needs to do is start planning to replace this turkey fast, tread water with the fatihful until 2015, and offer some solid Trade programs on the Wii3

Orif they're really smart, they'll merge with Apple while they've still got $6 billion in the bank to grease the wheels

Posted:A year ago

#4

Nicholas Pantazis Senior Editor, VGChartz Ltd

1,020 1,467 1.4
Popular Comment
@ Jeff It's adorable that you think Apple hasn't been serious this whole time. Apple has considered themselves a direct portable gaming competitor since the very day the App Store launched. They devoted entire conferences to telling people that there was no reason to own a DS when you could buy an iPod Touch (kind of funny, looking at it now). Apple has been serious and Apple has been proven WRONG. Apple's problem is that they thought one device would rule them all, when it's pretty clear now that the market will continue to support a variety of devices, the 3DS included.

The 3DS doesn't really have a major problem, other than that it will never really catch up to the DS (but nothing ever will). I would put pretty solid money on it selling better than the PS4 and Xbox One though, which may not be saying a lot at the end of the day. The Wii U at this point is likely headed to a Gamecube fate. Excellent, but small and focused software library and a small userbase of 20-25 million gamers. They're best off just riding it out.

PS: Nintendo has more than $10 billion in the bank. Apple buying them out would require more than $20 billion when you add in their assets and market value (possibly significantly more). This would be far more than any electronic buyout in history, and almost twice what it cost for Google to buy Motorola and three times the cost of Microsoft buying Nokia. Even on a down moment, Nintendo is an INCREDIBLY valuable company, and still the most valuable gaming company (if Microsoft and Sony were valued on gaming alone their state would not be nearly as pretty).

Posted:A year ago

#5

Andy Samson QA Supervisor, Digital Media Exchange

237 180 0.8
The 2DS made a lot of sense but this? This is ridiculous. The GamePad is an integral part of the Wii U system, it is not something you can simply turn off like the 3D slider. This is not Kinect or any add on peripheral. Most of what makes the system special is built around the functionality of the unique controller. A lot of games will become unplayable without the GamePad.

The convenience of off-screen play is undeniable, even the competition has made their own "impractical" version. Even steam's new controller has a touchscreen that also displays user interface which is roughly the same size as the original 3DS' touch screen. The downside is this screen is too small to make it usable for off-screen play.

Posted:A year ago

#6

Paul Jace Merchandiser

937 1,417 1.5
I second Nicholas that the 3DS doesn't have any real problems. As a matter of fact, I'd go as far as to say that without the 3DS(and their handheld business in general) Nintendo would probably start really thinking about leaving the hardware business "IF" the Wii U and their next console failed.

The Wii is pretty much dead in the water. Thats not that big of a deal considering it has already sold over 100 million units but it's future is as bright as a vampire trapped in it's cave. You know, if vampires lived in caves. Anyway, I expect they will soon announce that production will also be stopping here in the US in the not-too-distant future.

Which brings us to the real problem: the Wii U. Stupid name? Check. Not truly next gen? Check. Typical lack of third party support Nintendo consoles have received since the N64? Check. Lack of consistent first party software to keep owners busy? Also check. Honestly the Wii U doesn't have much going for it and even if they got rid of the tablet and dropped the price down another $50 theres still not very many reasons to own the system. Actually, as is par for the course, the only real reason to own an Nintendo console is for it's long list of legacy titles. Everything else(third party titles, entertainment apps, etc) you can easily get on competing consoles that offer much more ammenities.

So how do they solve the problem of the Wii U? I suppose the real litmus test will be over the next three months(October-December). This is the Wii U's second holiday season and theorhetically the Wii U should be in a better position(release wise) than both the XB1 and PS4. And while I will still give Nintendo the benefit of the doubt I still have my concerns. Put another way, once January/February comes, if we get word that the Wii U was outsold by the XB1, PS4, 360 and PS3 during the holidays I would really be worried about the Wii U's future.

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Paul Jace on 4th October 2013 3:03am

Posted:A year ago

#7

Techni Myoko Programmer

40 75 1.9
On one hand I'd say no. The gamepad is it's only competitive advantage, and it's a good one. It's the only thing that makes up for it being the last, last-gen console.

On the other hand, Vita is going to be sold without it's touchscreen/touchpad/portableness, 3DS is going to be sold without the 3D (and arguably, it's portableness too) and we're begging MS to sell Xone without Kinect.

Posted:A year ago

#8

Jeff Kleist Writer, Marketing, Licensing

358 215 0.6
@Nicholas. I said merger, not buyout

And no, Apple has never been about gaming. Jobs actively sabotaged it in the early days, and was only forced to shut up by all those zeros. He actively forbade game controllers, and it took him dying to get those moving. Apple is one of very few western companies that it is very viable for them to merge with. I think you also forget that $20 billion is picket change for Apple

Nintendo is a cheap, ruggedized iPad mini away from a lot of trouble, and they know it. Check the Christmas want lists
http://seattletimes.com/html/technologybrierdudleysblog/2016792131_what_kids_want_for_christmas_a.html

Here's 2012
http://www.nielsen.com/us/en/newswire/2012/u-s-kids-continue-to-look-forward-to-iholiday.html

The price tag is the only thing keeping them in the game. Kids dump the 3ds when they get an iPad the same way you dumped your bike for the car. The only thing keeping the 3DS where it is is price tag., not desire for the product. The thing is barely eclipsing 6 year old consoles about to be replaced. Not good.

And I'd also say the fact that WiiU was number two should be an indicator of how hesitant parents are to shell out $350 for anything for a young kid. $199 is really the magic number

Posted:A year ago

#9

Adam Campbell Associate Producer, Miniclip Ltd

1,182 972 0.8
On price Nintendo can destroy the competition if they want to, even with the WiiU controller. Why take out the feature that makes it effectively a massive, super powerful DS? Would be a pointless omission.

As for the 3DS, as the fastest selling console for the past two years, I think Nintendo are doing just fine with it. And its more than just a flash of hope.

Posted:A year ago

#10

Jeff Kleist Writer, Marketing, Licensing

358 215 0.6
@Christian

Not true, here are two

http://www.phonearena.com/phones/compare/LG-Optimus-3D-MAX,Samsung-Galaxy-3D/phones/6851,5747

Here's the Christmas list for 2012, which is a tad more relevant
http://www.nielsen.com/us/en/newswire/2012/u-s-kids-continue-to-look-forward-to-iholiday.html

My point is that no sane parent gives a 6 year old a $500 tablet. But if that tablet is priced close to what 3DS is, then the game changes. 3DS is $150. If an iPad mini is $199, that's going to be close enough to make them buy one over the other often. My entire point is that the 3DS, which is actually selling is artifically dominant, and it won't take a lot to push it down a hill

@Adam, if they're willing to burn their next egg sure. Part of the problem is that the WiiU controller is very expensive to make. The screen and the WiFi chips alone cost more than the entire 360 or PS3 controllers (and I'll wager just as much as the new controllers) to make, let alone assemble. That's why Nintendo has to charge $99 for new ones, because they're at least $65-70 cost to about $25 for the others.

Posted:A year ago

#11

Adam Campbell Associate Producer, Miniclip Ltd

1,182 972 0.8
@Jeff

When the USP of the device is to do what the DS does except for the home and more (i.e. remote play), and in a time when second screen gaming is seen as 'the future' by major publishers, what good would it be to strip back that unique feature?

The WiiU as it is doesn't cost nearly as much as the upcoming consoles. Over the course of the year it will still be cheaper and will likely be lower than now.

The platform was built with dual-screen functionality as a standardised feature. I think it would be nonsensical to even consider taking it out. They haven't even had the opportunity to push sales with proper software and we're talking about an overly desperate way to make the console cheaper?

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Adam Campbell on 4th October 2013 9:01am

Posted:A year ago

#12

Jeff Kleist Writer, Marketing, Licensing

358 215 0.6
#Adam

If you look at my original post, I firmly say keeping the controller with the WiiU should be non-neotiable, and it only makes the confusion with Wii that much worse if they were to take that path, along with stripping its gimmick, If they were to do that, it's basically game over.


Much of the WiiPad's components are not scalable. There's not a good way to resuce the cost of building the things that doesn't seriously affect durability. Cost reductions in consoles typically comes from eliminating or combinging chips, like when Xbox merged the GPU and CPU in the slim. Nintendo's not going to be able to reduce the WiiU as fast, because those parts are simply pricey.

And I don't think that "proper software" is going to make a difference. Yes, the Nintendo faithful will buy the thing regardless, but their base is getting eroded by phones and tablets. The WiiU doesn't even really play the games on the current consoles noticeably better than the competition (and sometimes worse). The new consoles do second screen, and so do the old ones (Battlefield, Assassin's creed for example). Their gimmick is easily duplicateable, and it uses the equipment (phones, tablets) that people already have. I have very little faith that Mario, Donkey Kong, or whatnot will accelerate sales beyond momentary bumps, as the people who were going to buy it anyway do so. They're not generating NEW customers, but someday soon, Mario Kart 15 which is pretty much the same game that MK5 was is going to start to wear thin.

Posted:A year ago

#13

Daniel Hughes Studying PhD Literary Modernism, Bangor University

436 496 1.1
Popular Comment
Disappointed in the alarmist opening paragraphs: 3DS is a bright spot for the entire console industry, not just Nintendo, and it also boasts a fast growing digital business, the likes of which Nintendo simply didn't seem capable of growing as little as twelve or eighteen months ago. It's also the market leader globally, and will almost certainly be the best selling console this Christmas despite the introduction of powerful new home consoles and a plethora of smartphones and tablets on the market. The 3DS has gone from strength to strength since launch, selling more hardware and software each year, profitability increasing, and digital sales showing serious year over year gains. It's simply misleading to say that because 3DS does not match the hardware capabilities of smartphones through screen resolution, it cannot compete. 3DS's screen resolution is trumped by the Vita, has that mattered? DS was trumped by PSP in terms of screen resolution, and then from 2007 onwards, by the iPhone. Yet DS continued to sell strongly through to 2010. Software is what matters and software is why 3DS is succeeding.

Yes, it's important to acknowledge the 3DS is not as successful as DS, but the only console that was comparable in terms of market success was the PlayStation 2. 150 million selling consoles are by some distance the exception, not the norm, and compared to other handhelds, 3DS is doing very well. GBA hit 80 million, PSP and the original GameBoy 70 million, the GameBoy Colour 50 million. 3DS should peform at least as well as the GBA, and perhaps somewhere in the region of the combined sales of the original GameBoy line. A system that sells 80 million to 120 million, launched into a vastly more competitive environment than its enormously successful predecessor, should be hailed as a success, and not least against the plethora of opinions from "experts" that held that no handheld could succeed in the age of the smartphone.

I would also disagree with your assertion that Nintendo should repeat the 2DS trick with Wii U. What disappoints me most here, Steve, is that you do hit the nail on the head when talking about Nintendo's problems, and that's largely being overlooked:
In either case, though, Nintendo has to prioritize getting its top game franchises out on a regular basis. Gamers aren't going to buy a console without believing there will be at least one or two must-have software titles coming every quarter. Without third-party support, Nintendo has to make that happen with internal development. Nintendo should unleash some of its massive cash stockpile, and some proven management talent, to make that happen. If there's not a first-class release schedule that people can depend on, the company is in serious trouble for the future.
Software sells hardware. Nintendo's biggest problem has been a lack of software. As I have said on this website before, Nintendo have built alternative hardware without providing enough alternative software experiences to sufficiently justify and sell the difference. Instead of investing and expanding to cope with the demands of HD development, instead of buying studios like Atlus and Platinum, or investing heavily in Retro Studios and Next Level, Nintendo spent two years approaching third parties who had built their business on Xbox and PlayStation, attempting to poach brands built on Xbox and PlayStation, expecting that to sell Wii U. That simply won't work. There is no room in the market for Nintendo machine that offers largely equivalent experiences to its rivals: GameCube proved that conclusively. There is room in the market for Nintendo hardware that sufficiently differentiates itself from rivals: Wii proved that conclusively.

As it is, Steve, I think you've hit the real issue on the head while playing up issues that won't really matter too much. What is 2DS without 3D? A cheaper, child friendly handheld that lowers entry barriers in time for Pokemon. What is Wii U without the gamepad? Essentially in a similar position to the GameCube, except without being technologically comparable to its rivals. Concentrating on the hardware with Wii U misses the issues, but looking at the software line up, and Nintendo's difficulty in getting software out, highlights the real problem.

All that being said, I don't agree that the absence of Donkey Kong hurts Nintendo this Christmas. What would Donkey Kong do for Wii U that Mario, Zelda, Wii series, Batman, Sonic etc won't? Who else would buy a Wii U to buy another Nintendo mascot platforming game this Christmas? The reason DK is further out now is because Nintendo learnt a key lesson with 3DS--if you don't have big software to perpetuate momentum you have fought to establish, then sales will decline and that momentum is wasted. Look at 3DS in the West 2011 versus 2012 and you'll see what I mean. Nintendo desperately need to avoid that with Wii U. They still have strong brands this Christmas, and they have the benefit (which they will not have early next year) of still decent third party support in the Christmas period.

I would argue then, it's better to delay Donkey Kong, because it will help to mask the problem you have highlighted, Steve. Now when looking at the Wii U line up, there's a big first party release in the first quarter of next year, to tide people over until the truly big guns--Mario Kart and Smash Brothers--are closer to completion. Perhaps the real issue here isn't that Donkey Kong needed more development time, but that Mario Kart did, and Donkey Kong can ease the gap between Mario blockbusters. That still leaves Nintendo in the same situation, with a clear need to expand so that they can provide more software, more often, but by keeping software releasing consistently, Nintendo may just paper over the cracks for now.

Posted:A year ago

#14

Jeff Kleist Writer, Marketing, Licensing

358 215 0.6
Do you think Xbox One has 3 wifi direct capable antennas for its health? You don't need a lag free solution for a map or inventory screen, which works just dandy on current consoles.

It's really not speculation, Here's the teardown

http://www.ifixit.com/Teardown/Nintendo+Wii+U+Teardown/11796/2

these parts are not owned or produced specifically for Nintendo, they're off the shelf parts, and the cost of creating new chipsets and toolings would outweigh any savings. By producing the GPU and CPU on a single die, , there is a huge cost savings, first and foremost only requiring a single production line. The only customization was that the broadcom chips are running a custom firmware that contains a weak security protocol that got hacked real fast, and works fine with very little lag over standard household WiFi I should add. (http://www.eurogamer.net/articles/digitalfoundry-secrets-of-the-wii-u-gamepad)

http://www.techradar.com/us/news/gaming/xbox-360-s-new-combined-cpu-gpu-explained-711942

This combining CPU and GPU on the same die is something that Nintendo already does:

http://www.extremetech.com/gaming/137746-nintendo-tears-down-wii-u-to-show-off-single-chip-ibmamd-cpu-gpu

"Having a 2nd screen in the controller is completely different from having a second screen in an extra device."

Not really. You can still only look at one at a time, and putting your tablet on the coffee table easily puts it in line of sight for a map screen. A big part of the problem with the Nintendo is that they always design for Japan first. The WiiPad, near as I can tell is specifically designed around Japanese Apartment living, where privacy, and a kid having their own room, let alone their own TV is much less common. Typically, there is one family TV in the common room, and by giving junior what amounts to his own TV, it really is a great idea that keeps him playing WiiU all night long. Too bad it hasn't caught on there, but I admire the concept.But the same can be accomplished, with a bigger screen on an iPad, especially the 4 and up and dozens of other popular devices that support WiFi direct, and it's only going to get more common.

Posted:A year ago

#15
Parents are catching on to what "Free To Play" actually means with respect to mobile and tablet gaming. They're more likely to buy them a Nintendo console because that's who they trust not to rip them off.

As for the Wii-U. I've always thought it was a tough sell but lets just wait until the software line-up is stronger because that's the only sustainable answer.

Posted:A year ago

#16

Jim Webb Executive Editor/Community Director, E-mpire Ltd. Co.

2,270 2,439 1.1
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I expect Gi-biz to ask compelling questions. Not hit generating NeoGAF forum style questions.

Posted:A year ago

#17

Nick Wofford Hobbyist

180 190 1.1
Do you have played games on the Wii U that make extensive use the second screen like Lego City, Zombi U, Wonderful 101 or Nintendoland? None of these games can be done when the screen is in an extra device.
Judging from the software numbers, most Wii U owners haven't played them. It's no different than the Wii; the best Wii games made very little use of the motion control gimmick. It looks to be the same way for the Gamepad. I'm not an advocate of removing the tablet, but they should really stop advertising it like they are.

Posted:A year ago

#18

Jeff Kleist Writer, Marketing, Licensing

358 215 0.6
@Christian

Yes, we do know, both from statements from developers about what they're working on and looking at the published specs of the hardware. Given that everyone is looking at RemotePlay type features, there's no reason for a third antenna unless you're looking for an independent high bandwidth connection. Antenna 1: Internet. Antenna 2 controllers. What's 3 for?

Can you elaborate on why you believe that those games are unplayable?

The fact that Sony is giving the feature a lot of airtime has nothing to do with anything other than their desire to push the technology, and again, Sony targets Japan first. They also believe this is what will get Vita moving in the west. So no, not a lot of people are using it, but they hope they will. The issue is. It how many people will want to try it, it's how many people are still using it 6 months later., or more importantly buy, and don't resell Vitas for it

You're missing my point about the hardware. There's a difference between what all three console makers are doing with the console itself, and what happens with the Gamepad. That's why I linked you to the teardown. There is very little in the way of reduction that can happen in that thing. Go on ifixti yourself and compare the 3 models of 360 and you'll see what I mean.

Posted:A year ago

#19

Adam Campbell Associate Producer, Miniclip Ltd

1,182 972 0.8
@ Jeff
Much of the WiiPad's components are not scalable. There's not a good way to resuce the cost of building the things that doesn't seriously affect durability. Cost reductions in consoles typically comes from eliminating or combinging chips, like when Xbox merged the GPU and CPU in the slim. Nintendo's not going to be able to reduce the WiiU as fast, because those parts are simply pricey.
The speed at which costs for LCDs, networking components etc is coming down, Nintendo could literally bundle a full tablet with its own separate storage, multicore architecture and more at the original cost of the WiiPad at some point in the near future if they were crazy enough to.

Do you really think a controller with a screen and networking technology is a rock with no room to improve or reduce cost? I wouldn't count out a redesign with a better LCD and stronger battery.

Additionally you're speaking as if its the sole area where costs lie. The WiiU has modest chips on a big 45nm manufacturing process by todays standards (28nm is the standard for PS4, Xbone), they can still reduce the cost and size of the silicon there considerably. RAM memory prices / flash storage go down too, by up to 50% a year, optical drives get cheaper and cost of the casing if they make the device even smaller.


And I don't think that "proper software" is going to make a difference. Yes, the Nintendo faithful will buy the thing regardless, but their base is getting eroded by phones and tablets. The WiiU doesn't even really play the games on the current consoles noticeably better than the competition (and sometimes worse). The new consoles do second screen, and so do the old ones (Battlefield, Assassin's creed for example). Their gimmick is easily duplicateable, and it uses the equipment (phones, tablets) that people already have. I have very little faith that Mario, Donkey Kong, or whatnot will accelerate sales beyond momentary bumps, as the people who were going to buy it anyway do so. They're not generating NEW customers, but someday soon, Mario Kart 15 which is pretty much the same game that MK5 was is going to start to wear thin.
This will have to be a distinct difference in opinion. There appears to be a strong correllation between avaible software, as in must have titles people want to own the console for and the strength of the sales. This has been expressed internally and externally for a long time.

Even if many of Nintendo's IP are recycled, we're looking at some of the highest selling and highest rated games of all time and in RECENT years. Mario alone can still sell to more than 1/3 of an installed base. That would beat a number of Playstation exclusives put together.

Even if we assume Nintendo can only sell to existing fans, the WiiU has a lot more room to grow there should they have something to buy. I'm not a devout Nintendo guy but I may find it hard to resist a low cost system with a next gen vision of titles like Zelda, Metroid, Mario as well as a flood of indie games that have been made available through the console, thanks to Nintendo's work on tols and policies.

Outside that, there is still an oportunity for Nintendo to continue 3rd party tie-ups, exclusives and as I said before compete with a low price without worrying about the WiiU controller, which is essential for a number of games published on the platform anyhow.

Nintendo have a hell of a lot of work today but they have a pretty good platform with costs they can control, stronger IP than their rivals and a lot of spare cash.

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Adam Campbell on 5th October 2013 12:52pm

Posted:A year ago

#20

Robin Clarke Producer, AppyNation Ltd

321 748 2.3
Even with revered brands from the past, the 3DS is just not competitive on a hardware level.
In an article full of laughable false equivalences and poor reasoning, this line in particular stood out.

No successful handheld format in the last 25 years has been technically competitive with the state of the art. Even if you count smartphone and tablet gaming (a different market), virtually all of the actual games being produced have to support several generations of legacy hardware. A successful handheld gaming platform is one that is best suited to games and is affordable to a broad demographic - high-end, general-purpose devices rarely if ever fulfil those criteria.

Posted:A year ago

#21

Techni Myoko Programmer

40 75 1.9
@christian sony gave attention to remoteplay, cause thats what iys been called for 8 years. Please dont give nintendo credit for something they stole from sony

Posted:A year ago

#22

Techni Myoko Programmer

40 75 1.9
the idea to stream content from a stationary console to a portable device was an obvious idea for everyone from the moment streaming could be technically done.
By that logic, no one should ever get credit for their inventions.
Nor should any reporter get credit for the events they report

Psps lack of inputs doesnt change the fact that it was sony's idea, and had a name for the better part of a decade, and we shoukd go by that name to credit the ones who came up with it, as its especially ridiculous to rename the original implementation to the copy. Worse, the lack of inputs isnt even a whole issue, there were ways around it. Especially on psp go where it could use a ps3 controller

Also remoteplay was not laggy, and while limited to few ps3 games, it includes every ps1 game. It is about Nintendo stealing it from sony, the insulting part is when people try to give nintendo credit for it

Posted:A year ago

#23

Nicholas Pantazis Senior Editor, VGChartz Ltd

1,020 1,467 1.4
Remote Play was extremely laggy, and is built on a completely different technology. Remote play was designed to be played away from home, over Wifi, while the WIi U GamePad is directly connected to the main console and is designed to be played around the room and house, lag-free. In fact, there is less lag in the Wii U gamepad than there is in your HDTV. Not believing remote play was laggy shows a lack of understanding of what lag actually is, and the limits of the PSP's wifi capabilities (and the delays involved in wifi streamed gaming in general).

Furthermore, input is EVERYTHING. Workarounds are not the same as native button support. The fact that the Vita still lack the essential R2, R3, L2, and L3 inputs of the dualshock 4 implies that we're in for another set of awkward "workarounds" that are nowhere near as comfortable as built in inputs.

Off-TV Play is an option built into the system, just as second screen play is. Should we call Sony copycats for allowing the Vita to work as a second-screen gamepad for the PS4? The DS did that almost 10 years ago, and the Wii U was announced to do it more than two years ago. Technology is both iterative and evolutionary. People share all sorts of ideas. Move and Kinect would never have existed without the WIi, no matter what Sony or Microsoft tells you. PlayStation All-Stars would CERTAINLY not exist without Smash Brothers.

So, yeah, maybe Nintendo got the idea from Sony, but it's much more likely that they got the idea from their own Nintendo DS. They built a DS on your TV, and by nature of that design Off-TV Play was a logical continuation of that feature.

Posted:A year ago

#24

Daniel Hughes Studying PhD Literary Modernism, Bangor University

436 496 1.1
Did everybody forget the GBA to GC connectivity?? Sad to see this is where the conversation went, though.

Posted:A year ago

#25

Keldon Alleyne Handheld Developer, Avasopht Ltd

449 423 0.9
Dudes come on. The idea of streaming video isn't exactly ground breaking so it would be silly to suggest Nintendo needed to copy Sony in order to include this feature. The idea of streaming the display actually dates back to dumb terminals in like the 70's where clients would be interacting with a remote server over teletype interfaces.

Posted:A year ago

#26

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