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Ouya expects first million-dollar devs by the year's end

Ouya expects first million-dollar devs by the year's end

Fri 26 Jul 2013 8:13am GMT / 4:13am EDT / 1:13am PDT
HardwarePublishingDevelopment

CEO Julie Uhrman defends console's divisive first month on the market

Ouya CEO Julie Uhrman believes that developers on the nascent platform will be reporting revenue in the millions by the end of the year.

Speaking to The Verge, Uhrman challenged the micro-console's critics, who have rallied around its lacklustre reviews and underwhelming sales figures. On the latter issue, Uhrman revealed that 27 per cent of Ouya users have bought a game - all of which are free-to-play initially - since its launch last month, and 13 or the top 20 games report 8 per cent of players choosing to pay.

"I think there are a lot of social and mobile app developers that would kill for an 8 percent attach rate on a platform that's 30 days old," Uhrman said. "These numbers will grow as more gamers pick up consoles, and as we attract more developers, and I believe that by the end of the year, we'll see a few developers telling us they've made more than a million dollars on Ouya."

Ouya developers started reporting their first-month sales figures earlier this week. Several developers expressed disappointment with the performance of their games, with some questioning the worth of the extra effort required to port to the platform.

However, others seemed content with the extra revenue, even though it amounted to only a few thousand extra sales. Indeed, Uhrman offered two of those games - TowerFall, which has made $21,000 to date, and Hidden In Plain Sight, which has made $4,381 - as evidence of Ouya's promise.

"To say developers can't make money on Ouya - I take offense to that," she said. "I'm sure the creators of TowerFall and Hidden in Plain Sight would take offense to that. The console has only been out for a month, and developers have only had access to the hardware for about 6 months. We really like what we see so far, and so do developers and gamers."

Last week, Ouya announced a new initiative that will match a developer's crowd-funded capital dollar-for-dollar in exchange for a period of exclusivity. This move, Uhrman explained, is a manifestation of Ouya's belief that "content is critical" to the platform's future success. That success, though, will take time.

"Five days after launch, reviews came out and people were writing us off. If every company that got mixed results right out of the gate would have given up, we wouldn't have an iPhone, we wouldn't have an iPod."

5 Comments

James Prendergast
Research Chemist

730 411 0.6
["Indeed, Uhrman offered two of those games - TowerFall, which has made $21,000 to date, and Hidden In Plain Sight, which has made $4,381m - as evidence of Ouya's promise."

4 billion dollars?! That is evidence of promise! ;)

I think the platform will have some promise going forward - it's not really my cup of tea but then neither is gaming on tablets or phones and that appears to be a thriving ecosystem, if not profitable for every game released...

Posted:A year ago

#1
Good eyes, James

Posted:A year ago

#2

Zbigniew Lebkowski
3D Artist & Animator

11 18 1.6
"I think there are a lot of social and mobile app developers that would kill for an 8 percent attach rate on a platform that's 30 days old,"
I cannot agree with that. The platform has been around for a long time now. It may have changed its form factor from mobile to console but that's still basically the same old android.

Posted:A year ago

#3

Jeff Kleist
Writer, Marketing, Licensing

264 128 0.5
I'd have to agree

My own research into th platform, admittedly anectdotal has found that they're sitting on retail shelves, the general public has near zero awareness, new Xbox and PlayStation in a few months, and that the vast majority (virtually all) want it for emulation. This is not unusual, as "home brew" on anything outside the dedicated hacker types that port Linux and Doom to your smart watch is typically pointed in this direction, and that's been true at least since Dreamcast

Ever all developer friends have found it difficult to run the bigger games on. Given that Apple is finally introducing controller support with iOS7, and that Android already has it, seems to me that if Ouya is to succeed NOT as a piracy box, its got its work cut out for it.

In my opinion, They'd be better of trying to sella more powerful version to drive smart TV in the developing world. That's where the real customers for this kind of hardware are

Posted:A year ago

#4

Nuttachai Tipprasert
Programmer

79 60 0.8
"I think there are a lot of social and mobile app developers that would kill for an 8 percent attach rate on a platform that's 30 days old,"
But after taking install based in to account, their 8 percent attach rate is nothing comparing to millions of smartphone and tablets out there.

And, to be frank, the people whom OUYA is targeting is not a kind that happily play social games 'neither on consoles nor mobiles'. So, at the end of the day, I still fail to see how OUYA can be relevant in the market, given that it's just a half mobile half console which lacks killing features from both platforms (mobility and HD visuals).

Posted:A year ago

#5

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