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Emulator expert Robert Broglia bringing entire catalogue to Ouya

Emulator expert Robert Broglia bringing entire catalogue to Ouya

Thu 28 Mar 2013 8:44am GMT / 4:44am EDT / 1:44am PDT
HardwareDevelopment

Android micro-console could become destination for classic gaming

The forthcoming Ouya console may become a destination for emulation of classic games.

According to a post on the Ouya forums, the leading Android emulator developer Robert Broglia is bringing "all" of his work to the platform.

Broglia's work includes emulators for GameBoy Advance, GameBoy Color, Sega Genesis/Mega Drive, Sega Master System, Sega Saturn, NES, SNES, N64, Neogeo and Atari 2600. The first to launch will be Snes9x EX+, which promises , "near complete game compatibility."

Broglia's interest in the Ouya helps to answer one of the major outstanding questions around the validity of the platform: the availability of games. In February, former thatgamecompany exec Kellee Santiago was hired as head of developer relations for Ouya.

"Ouya gets it," said Santiago at the time. "This is the first console company that really understands how important it is to remove the barriers to development. By freeing up the development process, Ouya is opening up new doors in console gaming."

Portal developer Kim Swift was also confirmed to be developing a game for the platform.

14 Comments

Alex Bunch
Proof Reader

87 86 1.0
Aw fair warms the heart to think of those thousands of illegal ROMS winging their way Ouya bound.

Posted:A year ago

#1

gi biz
;,pgc.eu

341 51 0.1
Isn't it time already that copyright holders of very old titles give up on their properties and let ROMs circulate freely? No one is going to buy Snoopy for GameBoy anymore, so get real. Even if they wanted to, most games are nearly impossible to find. And even if they can be found they are pre-owned, so I still fail to see how companies would benefit from such sales.

Posted:A year ago

#2
I'm interested in your thoughts on whether this will have an impact of the success of the console.

Posted:A year ago

#3

Jim Webb
Executive Editor/Community Director

2,210 2,051 0.9
No one is going to buy Snoopy for GameBoy anymore, so get real.
And no one is going to download Snoopy for Gameboy either. The games people would download are likely still being sold by IP holders via digital means already.

Granted, there are still many titles that aren't available which is where emulation shines.


And Broglia needs to look into the Wii U and PS4. They've made some massive inroads towards opening up development to everyone. Though given that emulators are his specialty, his work would be one of the few that get blocked.

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Jim Webb on 28th March 2013 10:10am

Posted:A year ago

#4

Michael Benfield
Senior Designer

15 12 0.8
Irony from GI.biz getting two of the most prominent female developers mixed up while pushing for more recognition of female developers?

Posted:A year ago

#5

Jim Webb
Executive Editor/Community Director

2,210 2,051 0.9
Irony from GI.biz getting two of the most prominent female developers mixed up while pushing for more recognition of female developers?
The irony continues as I believe you've posted in the wrong article.

Posted:A year ago

#6
@Michael: Quite right. Thanks for the spot

Posted:A year ago

#7

Adam Campbell
Associate Producer

1,119 889 0.8
An awful lot of talk about emulators on Ouya this week, telling me that its a fairly popular thing among the community. Personally, I've never been interested and I'm looking for original content only.

Posted:A year ago

#8

Christopher Bowen
Editor in Chief

393 503 1.3
Matthew: None. Broglia charges $5 for emulators that have been free for PC for decades, all on Android. Furthermore, the only reason to buy them is to play (technically) illegal ROMs, unless you believe all of that "public domain" crap. Forgetting that issue that Robert Broglia is a scumbag who took the work many others did as a hobby, effectively stole it, and profits off of the piracy of others, I don't see people buying a console to play old video games when they can get the same effect by hooking up a PC with a DVI cable to any modern TV.

The casuals don't care, and the hardcores like me (I've historically been one of the staunchest classic emulation advocates in the games press) are offended. Doesn't leave much of a market for what is largely an experimental system.

Posted:A year ago

#9

Curt Sampson
Sofware Developer

564 278 0.5
...unless you believe all of that "public domain" crap.
Err....the whole point of granting government-enforced monopolies on IP, in the form of copyright, was to get more works in the public domain.

If you want to argue that, say, a 30 year monopoly (meaning all those early '80s games would be in the public domain now) wouldn't have provided enough incentive for the creators of the time to create those games, that's well within the spirit of copyright law.

But if you want to argue that these monopolies should be granted in perpetuity (meaning that someone, somewhere, would still be controlling reproduction to the works of Shakespeare), you've gone right off the rails when it comes to the purpose of copyright law.

And from a historical point of view, long copyright terms and harsh limits on fair use (including, but not limited to, the DMCA) tend towards permanently destruction of protected works. If everybody really obeyed the law on works embodied in, say, old coin-op machines, most of those games would vanish from history long before their copyright terms expired. Is that really what you're looking for?

Posted:A year ago

#10

Christopher Bowen
Editor in Chief

393 503 1.3
@Curt: You misunderstood what I was saying. Emulators are historically put out with the stated understanding that 1) no one play games that they don't own, and 2) that people play publically created ROMs, placed in the public domain, with their emulators that emulate the Super Nintendo.

It's a "wink wink" in the console emulation community that no one buys, for good reason: it's bunk. No one is downloading that Super Nintendo emulator to play Timmy's First SNES Game. They're doing it to play Mario World.

Posted:A year ago

#11

Keldon Alleyne
Handheld Developer

423 362 0.9
@Christopher: Some emulators were originally created for homebrew developers, hence why they have debugging features (something you don't just tack on).

The No$gba emulator was kept private from the public for years before being released (allowed only for professionals paying a fair amount for the software), but yes there is a bit of a "wink wink" in the scene because the homebrew community is very small compared to the piracy crowd.

I've seen a homebrew game of mine appear in a torrent of gameboy games. Can't say I wasn't chuffed, though I doubt anyone played it!

Posted:A year ago

#12

Peter Kasim
Animator

3 11 3.7
@Christopher, surely every bugger has owned a legit copy of Mario World at least once? Probably goes for most games people bother emulating: they're doing it mainly for nostalgic value and will therefore likely have forked out money for the thing somewhere down the line...

Posted:A year ago

#13

Jim Webb
Executive Editor/Community Director

2,210 2,051 0.9
Peter, that's one hell of an assumption to make. Many emulator users weren't even born yet for the games they are downloading.

And even if some of them were only downloading ROMs they once owned on cart legitimately, do we open the illegal flood gates for everybody just for that small segment that stays legal?

Posted:A year ago

#14

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