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NRA releases iOS game

Gun lobby launches firearm safety and target shooting app rated for ages 4 and up

Last month, the National Rifle Association derided the gaming industry as "a callous, corrupt, and corrupting shadow industry that sells and sows violence against own people through vicious violent video games..." This weekend, the group launched its own game for the iOS platform.

Rated for ages 4 and up (meaning it contains no objectionable material), NRA: Practice Range is a target practice game for iPhones and iPads where players use a variety of firearms to shoot bullseyes as well as human-sized targets on a handful of ranges. The game also includes tips on gun safety, an NRA newsfeed, and information on various states' gun laws.

The game was developed by MEDL, whose previous apps include Cheech & Chong's Fatty Comedy App, Britannica Kids: US Presidents, The Honey Badger Don't Care, and the official Wienerschnitzel app. Practice Range is available for free on the App Store, with unlockable guns as $1 in-app purchases.

This is not the NRA's first foray into gaming. In 2006, it released the budget PlayStation 2 title NRA Gun Club. Like Target Practice, that game focused on shooting targets. It received an E10+ for Everyone 10 and Older rating from the Entertainment Software Rating Board.

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Latest comments (10)

Shane Sweeney Academic 3 years ago
What a nice looking playground...
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Paul Jace Merchandiser 3 years ago
I think this game will miss the mark.
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Bruce Everiss Marketing Consultant 3 years ago
If ever a game needed an 18+ rating this is it.
Guns are designed to kill and maim other human beings. Ordinary citizens should not be trained how to do this.
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Show all comments (10)
Dan Howdle Head of Content, Existent3 years ago
Sod this target range malarky, the screen should present instead a series of ears popping up like whack-a-moles players have to put their fingers in them before any facts get in.
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Hahaha. The sensible Americans need to make their voice heard, because its getting drowned out by all the idiots of late.
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Kevin Clark-Patterson Lecturer in Games Development, Lancaster and Morecambe College3 years ago
Guns don't kill people, people do.
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Anthony Gowland Consulting F2P Game Designer, Ant Workshop3 years ago
If you think this game trains people how to kill and main other human beings you're as crazy as that chap Piers Morgan interviewed.

I'm not sure I can see where the news story is in the NRA releasing a game that promotes gun use without harming people, though. This is perfectly in line with their beliefs.
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Dan Howdle Head of Content, Existent3 years ago
Always amazed at the amount of pro-gun rhetoric found in the comments on GamesIndustry.biz. I thought, as an industry, we were smarter than that.
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Nik Love-Gittins Senior Character Artist, FreeStyleGames3 years ago
Putting aside their apparent hypocrisy, I don't see why this would need an 18+ cert. Until guns look and operate like phones ( or joysticks or mice or keyboards for that matter ) this is no more 'training' people to use them than 'Daley Thompson's Decathlon' trained people how to be athletes.
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Bruce Everiss Marketing Consultant 3 years ago
It has been re-rated as 12+
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