Close
Are you sure? Are you sure you want to report this comment? I understand, report it. Cancel

Connecticut town gathering, destroying violent games

Connecticut town gathering, destroying violent games

Wed 02 Jan 2013 8:21pm GMT / 3:21pm EST / 12:21pm PST
PoliticsMedia

Southington, CT group says giving up gory games is "an action of responsible citizenship"

A community group established in the wake of last month's Newtown, Connecticut shooting has established a Violent Video Games Return Program, hoping to collect and destroy violent games, movies, and CDs.

As reported by Polygon, SouthingtonSOS, a community group from Southington, CT (a little more than 30 miles from Newtown) is holding a trade-in event January 12 where people can turn in violent games and other media in exchange for gift certificates provided by a Greater Southington Chamber of Commerce member "as a token of appreciation for their action of responsible citizenship." The games will be destroyed and collected in a dumpster "for appropriate permanent disposal."

While SouthingtonSOS was established in the wake of the Newtown tragedy to create "a greater proactive public awareness response" to such events, the group insists that the collection drive is not saying violent games were the cause of the Newtown shooting.

"The group's action is not intended to be construed as statement declaring that violent video games were the cause of the shocking violence in Newtown on December 14th," according to a SouthingtonSOS statement. "Rather, SouthingtonSOS is saying is that there is ample evidence that violent video games, along with violent media of all kinds, including TV and movies portraying story after story showing a continuous stream of violence and killing, has contributed to increasing aggressiveness, fear, anxiety and is desensitizing our children to acts of violence including bullying. Social and political commentators, as well as elected officials including the president, are attributing violent crime to many factors including inadequate gun control laws, a culture of violence and a recreational culture of violence."

Southington School superintendent Joe Erardi, a member of SouthingtonSOS, told Polygon the move was intended to create a dialogue between parents and children.

"There are youngsters who appear to be consumed with violent video games," Erardi told the site. "I'm not certain if that's a good thing. If this encourages one courageous conversation with a parent and their child, then it's a success. We're suggesting that for parents who have a child or children who play violent video games, to first of all view the games. We're asking parents to better understand what their child is doing. Have a conversation about next steps."

Since the Newtown shooting, violent video games have been a subject of much criticism from politicians, pundits, and parents. In the days after the shooting, Sen. Jay Rockefeller (D-WV) introduced a bill that would have multiple government agencies investigating the effects violent games have on children. That was followed by the National Rifle Association pinning blame for the shooting on "a callous, corrupt, and corrupting shadow industry that sells and sows violence against own people, through vicious violent video games."

44 Comments

Christopher McCraken
CEO/Production Director

110 251 2.3
Popular Comment
And so, the book burners have now arrived at our industry. They can dress it up all they want. But that is exactly what this is. Book burning. God forbid a parent says "No", a gun dealer refuse to sell a gun...god forbid anyone take any personal responsibility. No, we're going to burn media that appears to small minded people to be spreading dangerous ideas, we don't have any proof, but let's burn them anyway...it's a nice song and dance number in the name of "Appearing to do something".

*sigh*....meanwhile, my country, America, anyone can pretty much get a hold of a gun, with little to no scrutiny. It's easier to buy a gun for a mentally ill person in the United States than it is to invoke a civil commitment against that same person. That is the nation we have here. But it's okay, let's just burn some CD's and DVD's and we will all feel better.

What a sad day.

Posted:A year ago

#1

Bruce Everiss
Marketing Consultant

1,692 594 0.4
Utter ignorance.
They should get themselves informed and read the US government research in Grand Theft Childhood. Or talk to Patrick Kierkegaard, a researcher at the University of Nottingham, who is a world expert on the subject.

Basically violent games reduce the incidence of real world violence because they act as a catharsis. The effect is significant and every country that has introduced violent games has had a concurrent crime reduction.

Posted:A year ago

#2

Paul Jace
Merchandiser

904 1,335 1.5
I've always wondered why nobody has tried banning the bible from those under the age of 18. Not only does it depict much more violence than your average mature rated video game but over the years/decades/centuries hundreds of thousands of people(if not more) have killed in the name of the bible and have even claimed as such. Just a thought.

Posted:A year ago

#3

Sam Brown
Programmer

235 164 0.7
This is entirely unfair. Not just the subject of the story, but that we can't make the biggest protest without invoking Godwin's Law.

Incidentally, who else thinks that a lot of people will, ahem, "back up" the games before turning in the original for the cash? :)

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Sam Brown on 3rd January 2013 10:15am

Posted:A year ago

#4

John Bye
Senior Game Designer

480 451 0.9
"There are youngsters who appear to be consumed with violent video games," Erardi told the site. "I'm not certain if that's a good thing. If this encourages one courageous conversation with a parent and their child, then it's a success. We're suggesting that for parents who have a child or children who play violent video games, to first of all view the games. We're asking parents to better understand what their child is doing. Have a conversation about next steps."
See, this at least I can get behind. A lot of parents are still ignorant about the content of modern videogames and, as a result, despite prominent age ratings and content warnings on their boxes, far too many graphically violent games still end up in the hands of children who are really too young to be playing that kind of content. Most parents wouldn't buy their children an R-rated movie and then let them watch it alone, but will quite happily buy CoD or GTA and let them play it unsupervised. A little education here would be a good thing.

Sadly in many of these cases, bad parenting is at least partly to blame. In Newtown, from the reports that have come out since the shooting, it seems that the killer was clearly suffering from some kind of mental illness and had been for many years, and yet his mother kept multiple guns in their house, apparently accessible to him, and reportedly left him to spend hours at a time shut away by himself in a dark basement playing violent games. That's not really a healthy environment for anyone, let alone a young man with obvious mental health problems.

Edited 1 times. Last edit by John Bye on 3rd January 2013 10:19am

Posted:A year ago

#5

Daniel Hughes
Studying PhD Literary Modernism

436 496 1.1
Utterly tragic when ignorance and destruction go hand in hand at the expense of civilized, searching debate.

Posted:A year ago

#6

Jim Webb
Executive Editor/Community Director

2,246 2,233 1.0
Ignorance.

Bullying hasn't increased due to violent video games or media. I guess these parents don't remember their own childhoods.


Paul, excellent idea.

Posted:A year ago

#7

Bruce Everiss
Marketing Consultant

1,692 594 0.4
The Godwin has to be done: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bGHzOJlC6eo

Posted:A year ago

#8

Jim Webb
Executive Editor/Community Director

2,246 2,233 1.0
I was wondering in what manner Godwin's Law was invoked as I didn't see any direct references to Hitler.

Posted:A year ago

#9

Sam Brown
Programmer

235 164 0.7
@Jim: He wasn't, it's just that this is an ideal situation to say "Book burning? That's what the Nazis did!" but internet etiquette won't let us. :)

Edited 2 times. Last edit by Sam Brown on 3rd January 2013 1:50pm

Posted:A year ago

#10

Jim Webb
Executive Editor/Community Director

2,246 2,233 1.0
Ah, gotcha.

We've had enough book burnings of our own here in the US (even recently *sigh*) that we don't immediately associate them with Hitler.

Posted:A year ago

#11
...also seems like the perfect opportunity to get rid off a few stinkers you might have in your collection ;)

Posted:A year ago

#12

Sandy Lobban
Founder and Creative Director

314 206 0.7
love is blind

Posted:A year ago

#13

Nathan Madsen
Composer-Sound Designer

5 2 0.4
""The group's action is not intended to be construed as statement declaring that violent video games were the cause of the shocking violence in Newtown on December 14th," according to a SouthingtonSOS statement. "Rather, SouthingtonSOS is saying is that there is ample evidence that violent video games, along with violent media of all kinds, including TV and movies portraying story after story showing a continuous stream of violence and killing, has contributed to increasing aggressiveness, fear, anxiety and is desensitizing our children to acts of violence including bullying."

What a strange comment. Much of the violent IP (books, films, games, etc) are international in their distribution and many other locations don't have as much gun violence as here in the US. Even the quote above states that violent video games were not the exact cause of the shooting but that's not going to stop some from restricting, wanting to ban and destroy it.

What this group fails to realize is that since man's appearance on Earth, humans have had a fascination with violence. Even if they were able to remove all violent media, other outlets would pop up. Prohibition didn't reduce American's consumption of alcohol, in fact it made the situation worse with the mafia and deregulation of the product. Just my thoughts.

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Nathan Madsen on 3rd January 2013 4:49pm

Posted:A year ago

#14
How about violence that is desensitizing our children to violence?

What message do we send them when we ignore that fact that every week as many kids die in South Central Los Angles as died in the CT shooting in total?

The problem is not the media. The problem is us. Thats just a lot harder to admit.

Posted:A year ago

#15

Rod Oracheski
Editor

58 23 0.4
Are they also destroying violent movies and books, or melting down guns?

Posted:A year ago

#16

Mark Friedler
VP Sales

11 20 1.8
Popular Comment
The games industry can't stick its head in the sand and act like the NRA. The equivalent of "guns don't kill people, bad people do" is that "there is no correlation between violent video games and real world violence". There is research on both sides and while I have publicly defended the games industry's (constituional) rights to create whatever content is "artistic expression", we should think about the consequences of kids immersion in hours of Hitman, CoD, GTA, etc.
I for one don't let my 10 and 12 year old sons play shooters. They can play FIFA or Little Big Planet all they want as they learn something. Both have used FIFA moves on the pitch in real life and that's cool. They have friends who just play CoD all day. That is a parental oversight issue however research shows a more visceral reaction to engaging in media as opposed to being a passive observer.
As a parent and games veteran, I believe we should take responsibility of the content we send into our culture. Glorifying violence in games, film, TV and music is not a constructive thing and I for one believe we have too much of it. You can't show a woman's breasts but its ok to show lots of guys getting their brains splattered all over the place. Something is not right here.
If we leveraged the industry's creative energies to build compelling original games, audiences will follow. For example the top of the charts on IOS has been JetPack Joyride and no one is getting fragged there. It can be done. This should be a challenge to the games industry as many of us are now older, have families and can see "the other side" of the conversation. But to act like the NRA and dismiss out of hand any calls for change or restraint is a losing batte both economically and morally for the future of the games business.

Posted:A year ago

#17

Nikolae Konlovsky
Team Leader

3 4 1.3
The less gory games the better. The more developer responsibility the better too, as we're always bleating on about everybody else's responsibility as if we all work in deprivation tanks and hold no contact or commitment to anything other than our precious selves.

Posted:A year ago

#18
Popular Comment
Years ago, we were debating this issue with regards to ratings at a GDC and an industry reporter got up and said, "I play DOOM with my 8 year old son."

We all gave him a shocked look but he went on to say,"After we're done, We talk about it. What was it like. What did he enjoy. What would it really be like if this were real."

When I was a child my mother limited my TV watching to 2 hours a day specifically because she could make two hours a day to monitor what I was watching and discuss with me any messages she felt she needed to.

Now, let me tell you another story. When the whole ratings thing happened, I was scheduled to talk at a community event about game development and I knew someone woudl raise the violence bugaboo, so i came preapred. When it was asked, I pulled a clipping out of my pocket and read it to them. It was the sales figures for the first MA rated game-- Mortal Kombat 2 (maybe 3, i forget), and in its first week it had done better sales then the box office of The Lion King.

I asked how could this be, given that it was an MA rated game, and the answer i got was, "well,w e can't control our children."
THATS a huge issue and its not our issue.

We cannot, and should not, take the place of proper parenting. The rating system, for all its faults, is there as parenting tool. If parents arne't using it I do not think we can or should take the blame. Its a lot easier to blame the media then to actually do the work of properly raising a child and we do the country a disservice when we allow such nonsense.

The comparison to the NRA is fatuous at best. Our product's purpose is not to kill people. The same cannot be said of a pistol.

Edited 2 times. Last edit by Jeffrey Kesselman on 3rd January 2013 6:29pm

Posted:A year ago

#19

Jim Webb
Executive Editor/Community Director

2,246 2,233 1.0
Popular Comment
I'm a parent. If I blame anyone other than myself for something bad that my kids do, I failed twice.

Posted:A year ago

#20
You can't show a woman's breasts but its ok to show lots of guys getting their brains splattered all over the place. Something is not right here.
Here where I'm typing, you can show women's breasts and show lots of guys getting their brains splattered all over the place! Yet, hardly anyone is going around shooting the place up. Weird!

The games industry might act like the NRA, but since one is about virtual entertainment and the other about murdering equipment, the arguments and their validity can not be compared, even if they are the same.

If you are scared of your children going mental by playing violent videogames, it might be time to have a talk with them and keep them away from these games. Why should I think about the consequences of GTA (etc.) on kids? They aren't for kids.

Following your train of thought, does anyone suggest we also think about the consequences of kids making porn? Any adult can - and has every right to - decide for himself whether to do and enjoy that kind of thing, but I think (and hope) we all agree we shouldn't have kids making porn. Should we try to make porn more child-friendy? How does this even make sense? And if it indeed does not, how does it when talking about violent videogames? Again, they are not for kids. It's your responsibility to keep your kids away from adult activity if they are not ready, not mine and not the activity's.

As long as the arguments remain as poor as they are, I'm quite happily dismissing these calls and enjoying my virtual headshots while we're at it.

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Laurens Bruins on 3rd January 2013 7:36pm

Posted:A year ago

#21

Andrew Goulding
Director

9 3 0.3
If people traded in their guns for games it would make a much more significant impact.

Posted:A year ago

#22
Yup. Yay for showing women's breasts in video games.

The fact that our culture treats sex as abnormal and violence is normal is a HUGE issue, but its a much bigger one then just in videogames.

Posted:A year ago

#23
"If people traded in their guns for games it would make a much more significant impact."

I guess guns don't burn as easily.

Posted:A year ago

#24
@Jim

I love you :) And as a prospective adoptive parent I agree.

Posted:A year ago

#25

Tim Carter
Designer - Writer - Producer

556 293 0.5
Ah yes....

Cue the cognitive dissonance and the hand-wringing from the game industry -- and its willful ignorance over reducing so much of game design into murder simulation.

Here's a hint: try taking on high order thinking so that game design has some resonance with ordinary people.

Posted:A year ago

#26
I'm with Mark here, and I find the tone of responses here generally disappointing. While I don't support the idea of the game burning in any form (and its ONLY violent games, not ALL games) - there is a hugely disproportionate amount of violent games on the market.

This I think is also a big factor behind the rise of tablet/mobile gaming - as there is a much wider range of games available, for a much wider audience.

As a side note, I generally avoid playing violent games - but I was playing Deus Ex last year, and my 3-yr old was watching during some play sessions. Within a week he was running around the house with toy guns pretending to shoot things/people/cats and my wife was horrified. My son later confirmed he 'learnt' the shooting from watching me play.

Posted:A year ago

#27

Doug Paras

117 61 0.5
I love this logic, as if there was no violence before there was movies, video games and music. Humans do violence, but it the weapons we have access to that make it so much worse. When the second amendment was created it took 15 seconds to load a single round pistol, now a days it take 2 seconds to load a 30 round Automatic weapon.

Posted:A year ago

#28

Mark Friedler
VP Sales

11 20 1.8
@Laurens - as for arguments equating childhood porn (an illegal activity) with games is just silly. As I said, I have always stood up for the rights of game publishers to put out whatever their content they like - (See my 2006 defense of the industry here with Adam Sessler against Jack Thompson at 3:12 in the video http://www.g4tv.com/videos/12508/the-loop-too-much-video-game-violence/ ) Parents who buy M-rated games for their 6 year olds are a problem.

But you make my point - why can't we have an adult conversation about it instead of knee jerking and name calling? My point is the games industry is filled with many extraordinarily talented people who can create great products. Why not put that passion into broader entertaining content? I believe overall violence is bad for kids and there is evidence to support that (See link in this article http://techcrunch.com/2012/12/20/violent-video-games-do-cause-some-violence-but-censorship-wont-help/) but that's not the point - we have the right to make this. But is this the best we can do? To say there is no causal relationship will just hurt the industry's credibility and our standing with regulatory bodies.

Let's all grow up, climb out of the basement and act like real media executives that have an important influence on today's culture and the future of our kids.

So - to repeat myself - LET'S HAVE A DISCUSSION about what is appropriate violence and what isn't.

Posted:A year ago

#29

Christopher McCraken
CEO/Production Director

110 251 2.3
Popular Comment
So - to repeat myself - LET'S HAVE A DISCUSSION about what is appropriate violence and what isn't.
I admire your position, Mark. I do. If I were not a realist...I would be 100% behind you. But, looking at this country today sadly, I think you have a view that, in the current social and political climate...not realistic.

In order to have a discussion, fair and equitable...all sides need to come together. There has to be give..and take. Both sides have to be willing to not only point out their successes, but their shortcomings as well.

There is nowhere on this planet more adverse to holding fair and equitable discussions in such a way as the United States of America. I say this, as an American Citizen, born and raised. I'll go one further: the nation I live in now, is not the nation I grew up in.

Our nation is divided, and has been for some time. This is about control, and who has it. The late great Frank Zappa made wonderful predictions about the role of government in regard to regulation of the music industry, and the content they published...things he was mostly right about. Make no mistake, games are very much about content publication. So we now face the same discussion, only this time...the mothers of prevention are even more adamant that the government not only do more to regulate commerce, but advancing the idea yet again...that it's okay to parent by proxy, using Television, Games, and Movies because, well..by golly...the government should sanction through legislation what is "safe" and "unsafe". Parent's shouldn't have to worry, because the Government will legislate them a safe and sterile world so they can get back to watching Honey Boo Boo.

All the while, the mentally ill go untreated.
Guns are readily available.
The lawyers are whetting their appetite.

There will be no fair and equitable discussion
. The ESRB is a joke. Don't believe me? Why is it a game like Puzzle Pirates has a teen rating, but every bible based game has an everyone rating?

I am all for a fair discussion, but...I face the grim reality that there cannot be one. Not while we refuse to even ponder looking at the societal causes of these issues. The root causes. Like it or not, spoons do not make people fat, pencils do not make you fail tests, guns by themselves do not kill people. (That said, on a personal note, I see no reason why private citizens need 100 round clips..)...we have had spoons longer than firearms, btw. Worth thinking about in our current climate of growing obesity.

No sir. There can be no fair discussion on this topic because we Americans have become the very cowards we vilify in our films and media. We are cowards because it's easier to blame someone else than take a look at ourselves in the collective mirror. It's easier to apply peel and stick judgements against Hollywood and Game Developers than it is to realize that we dismantled our mental health care system, starting in the 50's and culminating with the widespread dismantling of our Mental Health hospitals in the 70's and 80's.

To have a fair and equitable discussion about this, we have to be willing to take the cold hard look at what we have systematically done to ourselves for the last 35 years. We have to look at it all; and the sad, cold, and hard fact is this country is not at the point yet where that can, or will happen. We all know this: more people will have to die for no reason. More children sacrificed on the altar of "God, Guns and Apple Pie". Sounds crazy, but...we all know this deep down. It hurts to look at the trail you've left behind, and realize that while you're a great nation, you've made grade A mistakes that have resulted in an uncivilized society.

I will continue to make games, I will fight till my last breath for the freedom of expression in all of it's forms. But I will not delude myself into thinking that we are in any way near solving this issue yet. They tell people in 12 step programs: you have to hit bottom before you're willing to accept that you have to ask for help, to look inside.

America is a long long way from hitting bottom.

Posted:A year ago

#30

Greg Wilcox
Creator, Destroy All Fanboys!

2,156 1,076 0.5
So, what's the "causal relationship" in every killing (mass or otherwise) BEFORE video games? Comic books? Rock music? talking pictures? skin magazines (which would make it easy to hold a weapon with one's newly hairy palms)? Leaning over too far in any extreme looking for fault lines isn't doing anything but stirring whatever pot you're holding in your hands.

Maybe there's no relationship other than the one inside the head of the people who commit these crimes who think they can "fix" things they see as wrong with a weapon of some sort. Hell, if we were all so tuned into how bad violence is for society and such, why the hell would anyone willingly go to war?

it's not the games, folks... it's not the games..

Posted:A year ago

#31

Sandy Lobban
Founder and Creative Director

314 206 0.7
@Christopher Well said.

@Mark Why not just stop skipping around the fire and get to the source? ie; the murder weapons?

To all Americans. The rest of the world is giving you an insight into the alternative with their statistics on gun deaths. These are countries who share the exact same entertainment. On all the discussions on here, I've not heard one American endorse the stats from another country and their gun laws as a potential solution, although a couple on here might well do.

Posted:A year ago

#32

Jim Webb
Executive Editor/Community Director

2,246 2,233 1.0
Sandy, our problem isn't gun laws, it's gang violence and drug laws.

If you look at a US state with low gang activity, the firearm murder rate is far lower than a state with lots of gang activity.

Posted:A year ago

#33
@Mark

It's not a silly comparison, because the point of it is that adult activity is for adults, and not for kids. If you allow your kids to engage in adult activity when they are not ready, it is your fault, not the activity's. I understand childhood porn is not a pretty picture, but the metaphore is perfectly reasonable - albeit a bit extreme.

I don't see where I prove your point, because I didn't call anyone names. I'm not kneejerking just because I do not agree with you. I'll admit I'm not a fan of white knights, especially because most do not practice what they preach. Apart from that, the preaching is overly simplistic; there are many violent videogames, but instead of blaming it on a lack of creativity and getting all moralistic about it, I look at it differently. I wrote quite a long post about it not so long ago: http://www.gamesindustry.biz/articles/2012-12-06-roundtable-has-the-industry-grown-up#comment-57211

Posted:A year ago

#34

Sandy Lobban
Founder and Creative Director

314 206 0.7
@Jim I can understand that these things lead to guns being used. Humans will always look to settle disagreements in some way or the other, and when you can't call the police for fear of getting busted yourself, then of course guns are going to be the answer for any would be dealer/gang banger who needs to crush the opposition. The UK has the same issues with drugs, and these areas are almost exclusively the reasons gun deaths happen here. Either that or someone caught up in it by mistake. Generally though, the access to guns means that its not quite as easy for someone in the heat of the moment to reach for one, regardless of background. More people lose with easier access is my view.

Posted:A year ago

#35

Sandy Lobban
Founder and Creative Director

314 206 0.7
If we are associating gun violence so closely with drugs, you could argue that legalising drugs would decimate dealer profit margins and hugely reduce gun deaths. It would be interesting to see the results of that. :)

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Sandy Lobban on 4th January 2013 12:27pm

Posted:A year ago

#36

Jim Webb
Executive Editor/Community Director

2,246 2,233 1.0
Well, I was slightly alluding to that as a part of the solution.

Posted:A year ago

#37

John Bye
Senior Game Designer

480 451 0.9
Michael - "As a side note, I generally avoid playing violent games - but I was playing Deus Ex last year, and my 3-yr old was watching during some play sessions. Within a week he was running around the house with toy guns pretending to shoot things/people/cats and my wife was horrified. My son later confirmed he 'learnt' the shooting from watching me play."
And you've now learnt not to play violent games in front of your 3 year old son. You wouldn't watch Kill Bill, Saw or The Expendables with him in the room, presumably. So why would it be ok to play an 18 rated videogame in front of him? This is the real problem - a lot of people just don't look at games in the same way as movies.

There are age ratings to stop kids buying unsuitable games themselves and to give parents an indication of the game's content. In the EU there's even big icons showing you if the game contains swearing, violence, drugs etc. Without self-censoring, there's really not much more we can do as an industry. It's now up to parents to act responsibly and not let their children play unsuitable games unsupervised. It's not exactly rocket science, but sadly many parents (including some I know) seem incapable of reading the rating on the box or acting on it in the same way they would if that same rating appeared on a movie. The answer isn't to stop making violent games, it's to educate parents.

Yes, there are a lot of violent games out there, but it's a big, lucrative market. If publishers want to keep making them and adults keep buying them, that's their choice and their right. As long as we don't end up in a situation where all games are ultra-violent, I don't see the problem. As it is, there's a vast range of games available across many platforms which are appropriate for different tastes and age ranges.

Posted:A year ago

#38

Adam Campbell
Associate Producer

1,154 939 0.8
Ah more anti-game sentiment. Too bad the real issues in society aren't being resolved.

Posted:A year ago

#39

Christopher Pickford
Producer

54 75 1.4
Something that stands out to me:

"Rather, SouthingtonSOS is saying is that there is ample evidence that violent video games, along with violent media of all kinds, including TV and movies portraying story after story showing a continuous stream of violence and killing, has contributed to increasing aggressiveness, fear, anxiety and is desensitizing our children to acts of violence including bullying. Social and political commentators, as well as elected officials including the president, are attributing violent crime to many factors including inadequate gun control laws, a culture of violence and a recreational culture of violence."

Does anyone know the scientific studies alluded to in this statement? Genuinely interested in what they're referring to as fact here.

Posted:A year ago

#40

Christopher McCraken
CEO/Production Director

110 251 2.3
@Christopher Pickford

Probably the studies that have only ever shown a tenuous (and suspiciously derived) casual link between game violence and real violence. Because of course, correlation to these people simply must equal causation.

Number of peer reviewed studies that have shown a true scientific causal link between the two: zero.

Posted:A year ago

#41

Greg Wilcox
Creator, Destroy All Fanboys!

2,156 1,076 0.5
As i keep saying, it's not the games. Here's some sad history to digest for a minute:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bath_School_disaster

Posted:A year ago

#42
They could try trading their military grade 'home protection' in for knives.
Then when your kid goes on a rampage they do a lot less damage and you still get to bear arms.
That part of the constitution is surely outdated? I think the point of bearing arms is to violently overthrow the american government in a revolution. Who is going to take on the american military? Even with their ridiculous;y overpowered personal firearms the american populace could never hope to take on predator drones, artillery and battleships.
So why not get rid of the guns?
If everyone has them taken away you are far less likely to NEED a gun to protect against an intruder who also probably won't have a gun.
All I have here in the UK is a frying pan to defend my home and i don't live in fear.

Posted:A year ago

#43

Greg Wilcox
Creator, Destroy All Fanboys!

2,156 1,076 0.5
Annnnnd... they backed down from their plan. Well, at least some sanity sort of remains after all that...

Posted:A year ago

#44

Login or register to post

Take part in the GamesIndustry community

Register now