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THQ launches Humble Bundle

Publisher letting gamers name their price on seven-game collection including Darksiders and Saints Row: The Third [UPDATE: well over $2m raised]

Update: In the first 16 hours, THQ's Humble Bundle has managed to generate well over $2 million, with more than 400,000 bundles sold.

Original story:

THQ is trying out a new way of monetizing its back catalog of games. The publisher has teamed up with Humble Bundle to launch the Humble THQ Bundle, a downloadable collection of games available in a name-your-price business model.

For as little as $1, gamers can purchase Darksiders, Metro 2033, Red Faction: Armageddon, Company of Heroes, and two Company of Heroes expansion packs. If they opt to pay more than the current average price of the games (a little over $5 as of this writing), customers will also get Saints Row: The Third. Previous Humble Bundles let gamers choose from Mac, PC, or Linux titles, but the Humble THQ Bundle is limited to PC games that will need to be downloaded through Steam.

Within hours of launching, the Humble THQ Bundle had brought in more than $470,000. While the offering--which runs for the next two weeks--will generate revenue, not all of it will go to the publisher. As with previous Humble Bundle offerings, customers can choose how their money is split between the game maker, the Humble organizers, and charities like Child's Play and the Red Cross.

Any boost in revenues from the bundle would be welcome news for THQ, which has faced numerous struggles recently. Earlier this month, the publisher released its quarterly sales figures, saying it was running short on capital and exploring its options. The following week, it defaulted on a $50 million loan from Wells Fargo. Since then, the publisher reached an agreement with Wells Fargo and announced the resignation of CFO Paul Pucino, with no replacement named.

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Latest comments (13)

Kevin Clark-Patterson Lecturer in Games Development, Lancaster and Morecambe College4 years ago
$500k is one step closer to $50m! Ouch!
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Stephan Schwabe Multichannelmanagement, Telefonica4 years ago
This bundel is so great! I spend 40 on this. SR3 and CoH anlone is worth the bundle.

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Stephan Schwabe on 30th November 2012 10:22am

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gi biz ;,pgc.eu 4 years ago
I'd like to point out that Linux and Mac are personal computers (ie: PCs) as much as Windows is (even more personal, someone might argue). Although many like to think PC = Windows this is quite incorrect.
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Show all comments (13)
Barrie Tingle Live Producer, Maxis4 years ago
@Michele - While it is technically incorrect it is what the industry uses. Even on game box covers it says "PC" and not "Windows". Also, Apple's own advertising suggests that they don't see themselves as a PC through the "I'm a Mac, I'm a PC" advertising.
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Jim Webb Executive Editor/Community Director, E-mpire Ltd. Co.4 years ago
Barrie, that's exactly what I was going to say.

When Apple sees itself as a PC, then we can ll start working on the proper vernacular.
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Christophe Briend Gameplay Programmer 4 years ago
I've got mixed feelings about this..
I did gladly spent 15$ yesterday on this even if I already own COH because its a really good offer and I feel THQ actually needs the help.
I'm not confortable with it though as this offers comes from the guys that has been known for their 'humble INDIE bundle', this is not just a steam sale. EA already got their 'indie bundle' - not part of the humble bundle, but still. I wonder when activision is going to have its own "humble" bundle..
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Stephen Woollard Online Infrastructure Specialist, Electronic Arts4 years ago
If I recall correctly, the term PC springs from the early 1980's IBM Personal Computer, and it kind of stuck. It was always used to describe hard and software that is "PC compatible" ie it would run on an IBM PC.
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Bonnie Patterson Narrative Designer, Writer 4 years ago
Go go THQ!

Really want to see these guys survive.
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gi biz ;,pgc.eu 4 years ago
@Barrie: what's written on game boxes seems like a valid argument to keep on being wrong. Much like the "I've seen it on tv". I guess that automatically makes the "MB" and "GB" suffixes printed everywhere correct over "MiB" and "GiB".

@Stephen: indeed, I heard the same. My computer is for personal use and is an Intel, so I'm fairly sure it's a personal computer. Though Microsoft succeeded in spreading the idea that a "normal" PC must have Windows running. I'm not surprised when non-technical people get confused, but I guess I'll never get used to people from the industry feeding this ambiguity.
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Jim Webb Executive Editor/Community Director, E-mpire Ltd. Co.4 years ago
Michele, the problem is that even Apple goes with that incorrect moniker.

It's not that Windows perpetuates it alone but Apple themselves do.
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Paul Shirley Programmers 4 years ago
@Stephen Woolard:

Yes, we used to just call them computers, microcomputers or the use the model name. The 'personal' bit was redundant before pre built computers hit the market because no-one needed to distinguish them from time shared mainframes by then. IBM more or less resurrected it and took it for their own. I doubt 'PC' would be in use for anything today without IBM appropriating it decades ago.

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Paul Shirley on 1st December 2012 6:24pm

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Adam Jordan Community Management/Moderation 4 years ago
@Christophe Briend

I have had this debate with quite a few people already, both on-line and offline.

Personally I see no issue with it...although Humble Bundle started out with indie titles, I don't think it was stated any where that it was solely and exclusively for indie bundles. As you may have noticed, it's not called the Humble INDIE Bundle, it's just called Humble Bundle.

Furthermore, I have always seen Humble Bundles whether indie or not a cause for raising money for charity whilst raising awareness for some under rated or not so well known games. Granted, most of THQ games are well known but I certainly would say games like Metro and SR3 are under rated

If anything, I am just quite surprised they have raised over $2 million, well from hearing that the average most have paid being $5.69 for a bundle worth over $200

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Adam Jordan on 2nd December 2012 5:20am

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Andrew Goodchild Studying development, Train2Game4 years ago
Hopefully this will help them stay afloat until the games they are working on can be finished and released. The selection makes sense. Darksiders has a sequel already, all the others except Red Faction have sequels in development, so anyone who is introduced to the games and likes them, could be pushed towards the new games when they are released.
The Humble Bundle has also released ebook and music bundles now, the only criticism I have is the frequency of them has made me complacent about them now.
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