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Windows president Sinofsky leaves Microsoft

Windows president Sinofsky leaves Microsoft

Tue 13 Nov 2012 4:23am GMT / 11:23pm EST / 8:23pm PST
People

Julie Larson-Green now heading Windows engineering

Microsoft has announced that Windows president Steven Sinofsky has resigned from the company effective immediately. Corporate vice president of program management Julie Larson-Green will be heading up all Windows software and hardware engineer, having previously been responsible for Windows 7 and 8 user interface design and research. Chief financial officer and chief marketing officer Tami Reller will take over Windows business practices. Both executives will report directly to chief executive officer Steve Ballmer.

“I am grateful for the many years of work that Steven has contributed to the company,” said Ballmer. “The products and services we have delivered to the market in the past few months mark the launch of a new era at Microsoft. To continue this success it is imperative that we continue to drive alignment across all Microsoft teams, and have more integrated and rapid development cycles for our offerings.”

“It was clear to me that Julie is the best possible person for this job, and I'm excited to have her in this role,” Ballmer said.

Many expected that Sinofsky would take over the CEO's chair when Ballmer decided to retire. An anonymous source told Business Insider that Sinofsky's departure was over the position of CEO, with Ballmer indicating that he wouldn't retire until 2017/2018. Other sources inside Microsoft told the Verge Sinofsky was ousted due to clashes with other executives. Microsoft and Sinofsky are portraying the split as amicable.

“After more than 23 years working on a wide range of Microsoft products, I have decided to leave the company to seek new opportunities that build on these experiences. My passion for building products is as strong as ever and I look forward focusing my energy and creativity along similar lines,” wrote Sinofsky in an email sent to employees obtained by CNET.

6 Comments

Peter Dwyer
Games Designer/Developer

481 290 0.6
Ok not a bad thing as the person responsible for the Modern UI is taking over and by the looks of things dragging the Windows interface screaming into the new millennium.

I love Modern UI and especially live tiles, which have the potential to really make windows something special. It's like watching 30 personal channels when you have then set-up right. The next step is to replace the desktop as this barren and cold screen that pops up if you hit a legacy app. There's no reason for it anymore. I find and I've seen with my friends, that once you understand the start screen you rarely go back to the old boring desktop. In fact when you do it's a jarring experience. You start looking for active elements and then shortly after realising they aren't there you start looking for the "Escape from desktop mode" button!

Edit: I should add one important caveat

Windows Modern UI is a touch environment and don't let anyone tell you otherwise. My friend upgraded to a touch screen shortly after upgrading to Windows 8 and I myself am upgrading to a strapping dell xps one 27 touch. It's not weird and in fact becomes second nature to swipe on your monitor while sitting in front of the screen. I've heard some people say that they wouldn't do it and indeed that was my friends original attitude. It too all of five minutes and a game of plants vs zombies using the touch screen to completely change that around (I'm talking political U turn kind of speed here). Suddenly it was like he'd been advocating touch for generations! Navigating Modern UI like a pro using the touch screen and then seamlessly switching to the keyboard and mouse once in a program. O_o

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Peter Dwyer on 13th November 2012 8:48am

Posted:A year ago

#1

Tom Keresztes
Programmer

644 263 0.4
Popular Comment
Windows Modern UI is a touch environment
But the corporate environment is not.
The next step is to replace the desktop as this barren and cold screen that pops up if you hit a legacy app.
Yeah, sure. Could you imagine Visual Studio in the Metro UI?
Windows interface screaming into the new millennium.
Full screen windows were introduced into Windows to deal with the limited resolution of the screens. As desktop resolutions increased, its usage become less common. In MacOS/X it was (and still not) common to make a window full-screen... Going back to Windows 3.1 is the new millenium ?
Modern UI like a pro using the touch screen and then seamlessly switching to the keyboard and mouse once in a program
This "switch" makes the UI slow. Pros use the keyboard (no matter the profession) as a shortcut is faster and does require them to break focus...

Posted:A year ago

#2

Andrew
Animator

148 158 1.1
I agree with Tom. I like windows 8 at home for the most part and am even getting on with the new "start menu", I actually don't miss the old start menu at all.

But I can't wrap my head around using that in the office, it would just be awkward and unintuitive. If you then want to get into having metro versions of professional tools, it's pretty laughable. Bouncing between a touch orientated interface and a mouse and keyboard layout also sounds like a pain in the backside.

If Microsoft ditches the desktop only one thing is guaranteed, they wil lsend a large percentage of companies to Linux or Mac.

Posted:A year ago

#3

Nick Ferguson
Senior Producer

49 11 0.2
I've been using Windows 8 in the office environment since March, as you might imagine given my employer, and I really haven't found it remotely disruptive to my workflow.

Once you're in the desktop environment, you are back in very familiar territory - except that everything seems to run faster, is more stable and it is much easier to work across multiple locations / machines thanks to SkyDrive and the various sync settings.

This concern about moving between touch and mouse and keyboard seems to me illusory - I have no touch functionality on any of my machines and using the tiles is just fine with the mouse.

I may be drinking the Kool Aid but I like Win8 so much I have installed it on all 3 of my machines at home, too. I really don't see a downside and would strongly suggest others give it a go.

Actually there is one downside - Battlefield 3 doesn't seem to like running under my install of Win8 on an Alienware X51. Anyone from DICE reading this and got any ideas?

Posted:A year ago

#4

Tom Keresztes
Programmer

644 263 0.4
I've been using Windows 8 in the office environment since March, as you might imagine given my employer, and I really haven't found it remotely disruptive to my workflow.
Ask the same question to an artist or a programmer. Win8 feels like a core has been taken out, and something very light is offered instead. That makes it disruptive if you deal with more than one program at any given time.

And there are issues as well,
Did anyone tried the window decorations on a 27" or larger display? The 3 pixel windows borders along with the lack of contrast in the GUI reduces readability of overlapping windows - simply cannot distinguish where one windows starts and the other ends. Also, the charms bar is difficult to use on dual screens, as next to the top right corner is the display on the right (I am using two 27" displays in 2560x1440 ) so i have to be careful not to scroll over to the other display.
And why is the Search on Windows + Q and not S or F ? The build in app navigation is simply insufficient if you use a lot of applications.

But i would not give up on Win8 before the first service pack, as apart from the frustration, its snappier. And that the application's bar on the task-bar moves to the screen where window is - that feature is priceless.

Posted:A year ago

#5

Tom Keresztes
Programmer

644 263 0.4
Once you're in the desktop environment, you are back in very familiar territory - except that everything seems to run faster, is more stable and it is much easier to work across multiple locations / machines thanks to SkyDrive and the various sync settings.
Actually, there are the issues with the middle names imported from former Microsoft accounts. It still not resolved since march, and its back again on my Surface...

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Tom Keresztes on 13th November 2012 6:51pm

Posted:A year ago

#6

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