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Guild Wars 2 gets seven live dev teams

Guild Wars 2 gets seven live dev teams

Fri 05 Oct 2012 7:25am GMT / 3:25am EDT / 12:25am PDT
OnlineDevelopment

Lead designer Colin Johanson details development structure going forward

Guild Wars 2 lead designer Colin Johanson has revealed Arenanet will have seven development teams maintaining the hit MMO in the future.

The groups will deal with everything from bugs to new features to special holiday themed content, with hints that Halloween will be the first event to arrive in-game.

The full list is:

  • Live security
  • Live response
  • PvP/E-Sports
  • Holidays and events
  • Mac and performance
  • Bonus teams
  • Commerce

Together the seven teams are ten times the size of the live team that worked on the original Guild Wars.

"Our goal is to continue to raise the bar by keeping the game constantly updated with more high-quality content than any other game has offered before," said Johanson.

"To meet our goal, rather than have one small live team as is normally provided in traditional MMOs, we have formed multiple live teams focused on expanding Guild Wars 2 in the long term."

10 Comments

This is pretty much the best news GW2 fans could have. Dedicated team for Mac and performance sounds a little sketchy at the moment, and though I haven't really tested the beta fully it seems to be running OK.

Posted:A year ago

#1

Sam Brown
Programmer

235 164 0.7
Hmmm, no Linux team? ^_^

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Sam Brown on 5th October 2012 11:25am

Posted:A year ago

#2

Hugo Dubs
Interactive Designer

161 24 0.1
Great! they finaly make it work on mac!

Posted:A year ago

#3
This is a very expensive live team to try to support with no monthly sub fee.

Expect either a LOT of pay-for-content, or it to shrink pretty rapidly.

Posted:A year ago

#4

Rafa Ferrer
Localisation Manager

47 67 1.4
@Jeffrey My thoughts exactly.

I had expected them to set up a huge team for content development like this, it's the only way to keep the strong narrative focus that makes this game great, but with no subs income I don't know if they will be able to maintain it for long. I guess (and hope) they have figured that out, it's too obvious an issue.

Posted:A year ago

#5

Robert Mac-Donald
Game Designer

58 45 0.8
I'm really a borderline fan boy with this game. I think the gameplay is excellent.

I hope for the future of guild wars 2 we eventually get a new extra 5 slot skill system (perhaps limited to some new expansion only skills), as that would increase the longevity of the game with the extra complexity.

But most importantly, I think they need to give more emphasis on the Daily achievement system, and revamp the dungeon system so people end up doing all dungeons to see all the content and not just a few for the gear they want. There are plenty of different ways to make that happen. I just hope that they do.

Posted:A year ago

#6
@Rafa

One hopes they have decent plans but the only way I can see them supporting this is with frequent paid-for expansions at a significant price (like, new "box' price all over again.)

There has been a lot of over-exuberance over micro-transactions that never fit the realities of true generatable income. Zynga's house of cards is falling down right now. They just reported a $105M loss this past quarter.

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Jeffrey Kesselman on 6th October 2012 4:12pm

Posted:A year ago

#7

Morgan Ramsay
Celebrity Interviewer, Bestselling Author & Entrepreneur

5 1 0.2
Zynga's fumbles are not representative of the overall microtransaction business.

Posted:A year ago

#8
Its funny how Zynga WAS the most touted example by micro-transaction proponents, until the truth of their financials was revealed.

Now all of a sudden they are "not representative."

Fact of the matter is squeezing blood from stones is no way to make money, There IS a market in loss leaders, but the micro-transaction model in games isn't it. For why, see this blog:
http://worldwizards.blogspot.com/2012/09/why-microtransactions-arent-razorblades.html

Now, this is different from the "freemium" model which, if done properly is just a marketing term for the same old "free trial" we've had in the industry going all the way back to shareware days. This *can* pay off handsomely IF your cost of the non-converted is little to nothing, and you hit the magic balance point between giving people enough to get attention while holding back enough to motivate conversion.

Edited 4 times. Last edit by Jeffrey Kesselman on 6th October 2012 10:17pm

Posted:A year ago

#9

Nicholas Pantazis
Senior Editor

1,009 1,402 1.4
@ Jeffrey THat blog is simply wrong. There are now dozens of examples of highly successful freemium models, including the obvious two League of Legends and World of Tanks, both of which generate more profit than Activision Blizzard as an entire company. But, yeah, you know, stick to your subscription thing. That's working so well for Funcom.

PS: Guild Wars 1 released a new campaign every 12 months for ~ $40. Expect GW2 to do the same. These aren't expansions, they're more like sequels, and GW1 owners certainly didn't feel milked, as the success of that game and its campaigns shows (they sold a combined total of more than 6 million copies).

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Nicholas Pantazis on 7th October 2012 12:57am

Posted:A year ago

#10

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