Sections

Rovio devs form new HTML5 studio

"If we play our cards right we just might end up with the next Angry Birds"

Antti StÚn and Tuomas Erikoinen have departed Rovio to launch their own studio, Boomlagoon, in Helsinki.

The new company will build web and mobile games with HTML5, and is currently looking for investors.

"Through our experience of seeing multiple startups, we've gained the necessary skill set for founding and running a company with high values on all departments of the company," StÚn told GamesBeat.

"Our core skills are in game development but we've also had the opportunity to study fields such as PR, branding, recruitment, business negotiations, leading teams, HR, and networking."

CCO StÚn spent his time at Rovio building the server infrastructure for Angry Birds, while CEO Erikoinen was the lead artist on the franchise.

"We know a thing or two about successful games and high volumes and we'll use this knowledge to spawn something very cool and new," StÚn continued.

"If we play our cards right we just might end up with the next Angry Birds."

Related stories

Peter Vesterbacka leaves Rovio

Angry Birds' Mighty Eagle flies the coop to work in education

By Dan Pearson

Rovio's Angry Birds film has earned $150 million worldwide

But after a $400 million Sony marketing push, how much further does it have to fly to return a profit?

By Matthew Handrahan

Latest comments (3)

Tim Carter Designer - Writer - Producer 4 years ago
Only in the game industry would a studio be built around a piece of technology as opposed to a creative vision.
0Sign inorRegisterto rate and reply
Only in the game industry would a studio be built around a piece of technology as opposed to a creative vision.
HTML5 brings unique experience, cause it allows truly cross-platform titles. It's the future of social games when player's virtual pet, farm or city is available to him on every device from mobile to TV.
0Sign inorRegisterto rate and reply
Sergio Rosa "Somewhat-Creative Director", Domaginarium4 years ago
I am not sure if you're saying that's a bad thing. Tools are just tools IMO. It's not about what technology you use, but how you use it to "fit" your creative vision (AKA make the games you want to make). We, for example, use UDK because of its ease of use (really important because our country lacks local talent). However, we're not making a first person shooter.

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Sergio Rosa on 30th April 2012 12:44am

0Sign inorRegisterto rate and reply

Sign in to contribute

Need an account? Register now.