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Japanese schools using DSi to aid hearing impaired students

Teachers' words converted to text and streamed to devices via cloud

Japanese classrooms have begun using DSi consoles to aid hearing impaired children to understand lessons without the need to lip read or have sign language interpretation.

Software converts the teachers' voice to text, which is then stored in a cloud and streamed to various devices, including DS consoles, reports Venturebeat.

Although the scheme is still in its early stages, it's hoped that the low-cost DSi, which contains both a microphone and camera, could become a classroom staple, storing lesson notes and offering interactive learning experiences.

Yesterday, a similar pilot scheme came to light as part of Microsoft's Imagine Cup, in which teams from around the world competed to find technological solutions to global problems. One of the four grand prize teams, Ecuador's Team Falcon, developed a system which interprets voice data and translates it to on-screen sign language in order to assist hearing impaired children.

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