Close
Report Comment to a Moderator Our Moderators review all comments for abusive and offensive language, and ensure comments are from Verified Users only.
Please report a comment only if you feel it requires our urgent attention.
I understand, report it. Cancel

All Guns Blazing

Fri 09 Sep 2011 7:00am GMT / 3:00am EDT / 12:00am PDT
HardwarePublishing

Nintendo's drive to make a success of the 3DS builds momentum - and finds important allies

The fortunes of Nintendo's 3DS are likely to provide a focus of fascination for the games business for months if not years to come. We all know the backstory - it's the first time in years that Nintendo has faced the prospect of a genuine market failure, forcing a somewhat humiliating U-turn on pricing mere months after the device hit the market. At the new, lower price point, the 3DS has sold steadily - but many still openly question whether there is a real future for the platform.

What makes this fascinating is that Nintendo is clearly unwilling to accept defeat lying down. Nintendo boss Satoru Iwata told me in an interview just after the unveiling of the Wii that the company views its console launches more like the launch of toys - if a toy fails in the market, you don't throw up your arms in defeat and get out of the business (a clear reference to those who consistently argue that Nintendo should follow in Sega's footsteps and become a third-party publisher). Instead, you go back to the drawing board and launch another toy. Nintendo's huge warchest of financial assets would allow them to pursue such a strategy, Iwata explained.

Yet even if that strategy remains firmly in place at Nintendo - and given that the warchest is bigger than ever, there's no reason that it shouldn't - it's clear that it doesn't translate into abandoning hardware that's under-performing. Instead, Nintendo has focused its sights on the 3DS, determined to support the platform with an immense push in terms of aggressive pricing and promotion, extensive internal software development, and the calling in of favours from third-party publishers around the globe.

This is likely to be Nintendo's fastest and most aggressive schedule of first-party software in many, many years.

Next week, it seems, will bring many more details of Nintendo's attempts to establish the platform as a success after its early disappointment. Ahead of the Tokyo Game Show, a host of fairly credible rumours and leaks on Japanese games blogs have been joined by confirmed information in magazines such as Famitsu, pointing at a major 3DS offensive by Nintendo.

The company already placed a heavy focus on the 3DS at E3, announcing versions of several core Nintendo franchises for the device. After TGS (or rather, Nintendo's own events around TGS itself), it's likely that we'll have dates for several franchises, and confirmation of work in progress for others, with names like Yoshi and WarioWare being bandied about. For all that the 3DS is still frequently met with claims that "there are no games", this is likely to be Nintendo's fastest and most aggressive schedule of first-party software in many, many years.

What's even more interesting, though, is the work the company is putting into third-party relationships. If even half of the rumours are true, TGS will see almost every major Japanese software publisher lining up to announce major games for the 3DS platform - some of them continuations of long-standing DS franchises, such as Ace Attorney and Etrian Oddyssey, but others being moved over from home consoles, such as an alleged sequel to cult GameCube RPG Baten Kaitos from developers Monolith Soft.

Towering over everything else on offer, though, is Nintendo's success in securing a new Monster Hunter title - an update to the much-loved Monster Hunter Tri version of the series - for the 3DS. Much attention - and ridicule - this week has focused on the peripheral being produced for the game, a chunky and slightly unwieldy-looking device which clips onto the lower half of the 3DS to provide an extra analogue stick on the right-hand-side, along with extra shoulder buttons.

It's easy to poke fun at such an unloveable slab of plastic, but while Twitter sought to come up with disparaging names for the peripheral ("Frankenstick" is a personal favourite), it's quite possible that there were some pretty worried faces at Sony's headquarters in Tokyo. Monster Hunter, after all, is the series which breathed new life into the beleaguered PSP in Japan. It's still by far the most popular game on the platform, and any time you see a PSP being used in the wild there, there's a better than even chance that Monster Hunter will be the game in the UMD slot. Indeed, it's almost certain that the failure to provide a Monster Hunter title for the PSP Go did almost incalculable damage to that ill-fated console's chances.

So does Monster Hunter on the 3DS matter a lot, then? The short answer is "yes", but there are other factors to consider. It's worth watching TGS closely to see whether Capcom hints at another Monster Hunter update for the PSP, or if - as is likely - they're going to jump to the PS Vita for their next Sony platform version. If it's the latter, Nintendo may have earned themselves an extremely important sales window, as it's highly unlikely that a polished Monster Hunter can be ready in time for the Vita's launch window.

Nintendo's ambition here is clear. Right now, if you walk into an area where young people gather in Japan - the food court of a shopping mall is a good example - you'll see tables full of junior and middle school children all playing DS, and tables of high school and university students playing Monster Hunter on their PSPs. Nintendo wants to end that transition; it wants kids to graduate from Pokemon (one title which does remain curiously absent from the 3DS' release schedule for the moment) to Monster Hunter without ever leaving Nintendo platforms behind.

If it can achieve that - and bear in mind here that it's probably got quite a few months of lead time on any potential Vita version, as well as a price point that's significantly lower than Sony's upcoming hardware - then the 3DS' market position will start to look a lot more solid. Much, of course, depends on Capcom; Sony will no doubt be exerting pressure to keep Monster Hunter fans within the PlayStation brand family, but equally it's hard to imagine that Nintendo would go to the lengths indicated by the "Frankenstick" without some kind of assurance that it's going to be worthwhile.

It's also worth bearing in mind that many publishers have a strong vested interest in seeing the 3DS succeed.

Between Monster Hunter's arrival and the various pledges of major titles from other third-party publishers, it's tempting to wonder if Nintendo has started splashing the cash around its third-party partners, just as rivals in the console business have done over the past decade. There may well be some element of that at work - the warchest being propped open a little to support the 3DS' market position.

However, it's also worth bearing in mind that many publishers have a strong vested interest in seeing the 3DS succeed. For publishers and developers faced with an uncertain future at the mercy of the extremely low price points and unfamiliar business models represented by the rapidly growing iOS model of handheld gaming, the 3DS is a potential lifeline - while for those companies whose focus on RPGs and other niche titles that are too expensive to develop on HD consoles, the 3DS (like the DS before it) represents the potential to reach a broad, modern audience without spending more money that it cost to develop on the PS2.

The 3DS, in other words, might not just be good for Nintendo - it could be good for a whole swathe of the traditional games industry, which presently fears being crushed between the twin giants of low-risk, low-revenue iOS, and high-risk, prohibitively expensive AAA console development. It's no wonder, then, that Nintendo doesn't lack for allies when it seeks to bolster the position of the 3DS - and it simply makes it all the more fascinating that this is no longer a battle to make a console successful, but rather a battle to secure a future for an entire business model.

25 Comments

Starting with a blank sheet of paper?

Posted:3 years ago

#1

Dan Pearson European Editor, GamesIndustry.biz

119 370 3.1
Thanks Andy. :)

Posted:3 years ago

#2

Daniel Hughes Studying PhD Literary Modernism, Bangor University

436 496 1.1
Best of luck to them--I'm all for the prosperity of new business models and ways of gaming, but I'd hate for that to be at the expense of the traditional handheld market.

Also Rob--Monolith Soft are a first party Nintendo studio now, so I don't think they count as a third party developer getting behind Nintendo. If they weren't supporting 3DS, I'd expect Iwata would have some very serious questions for them!! Or were you simply making the point that home console franchises are coming to 3DS and using Monolith Soft as an example? If so, forgive my pedantry. :)

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Daniel Hughes on 9th September 2011 12:58pm

Posted:3 years ago

#3
The danger is MH Tri 3G - is that everyone has already played it to death (PSP, Wii, now HD remakes), and would rather wait for the next true upgrade on the PSV or PS3. If this was a true upgrade, it would be massive news - but as it stands, its big - but not massive (I'm currently semi-addicted to MH3 on the Wii, and have already sunk 60hrs into the title).

Also on the 3DS: I now (finally) have purchased a 3DS, and currently playing through Zelda (2nd title sits unopened). The revelation for me is simple: apart from the remake being a fantastic game, I'm getting addicted to the 3D visuals. I'm finding it such an enhanced gameplay experience, I am struggling to play it in 2D mode at all.

If Nintendo (& Samsung is it?) can improve the screen/tech such that the 3D 'sweet spot' is somehow enhanced, enlarge the screen/device, and build the new control shell into the new version of the hardware for a release next year sometime - it would give the device some serious additional momentum.

It wasn't until the DS Lite was released, that the DS really took off - and by then Mario & Mario Kart would also be out.

Posted:3 years ago

#4

Jim Webb Executive Editor/Community Director, E-mpire Ltd. Co.

2,283 2,491 1.1
Michael, Sharp is the parallax barrier screen manufacturer you are looking for.


Nintendo certainly made some missteps with the 3DS by designing it too closely to the recent DS models (coupled with the name it confuses the market into believing it's just a new DS model), a single slide pad, no major titles at launch and a very high price tag. All are being or have been addressed.

I believe we'll see a redesigned model at the pre-TGS media briefing that will incorporate the new peripheral directly into the console. It's the best way to move forward else the peripheral by itself may wither if support is lacking. Is a new design early? Yes, but so was a price cut. You can almost consider a relaunching of the console more than a redesign alone.

Posted:3 years ago

#5

Daniel Hughes Studying PhD Literary Modernism, Bangor University

436 496 1.1
Michael, Monster Hunter Tri has only been released on Wii--all the PSP titles are remakes/spin off games, but Tri and Tri G are only available on Nintendo platforms, so it should be pretty big for 3DS--potentially anywhere between Tri (1 million copies sold) and the PSP games (which approach 4 million) in terms of copies sold, and could shift hundreds of thousands if not a million or more machines. It's a huge win in the Japanese market, really, though its impact in the West will be negligible.

And Jimmy, I don't see a redesign coming so soon--it will build quite a bit of resentment amongst early 3DS adopters, and would only reinforce the perception that Nintendo will continually tinker with the DS line, making some buyers even more hesitant to jump in. Apple may get away with yearly i-device refreshes, but the core consumers Nintendo need to win over to get 3DS going won't trust Nintendo if they come out with a new 3DS months after launch, and a month after hundreds of thousands of new owners have bought the machine at the new price point. The price cut and big software will sell 3DS without causing any more confusion about constant DS refreshes. This slider peripheral isn't as big a deal as many sites have made it out to be--it only seems to be for use with Monster Hunter Tri G, and has been made to replicate the Classic Controller Pro (also made for Tri) control scheme on 3DS, probably to make the job of bringing Tri to 3DS easier and quicker. The benefit of having Monster Hunter out in Japan as or just after Vita launches can't be understated, and the peripheral was Nintendo's way of getting Capcom onside easily.

Like Rob points out in this article, Nintendo aren't dropping this 3DS model--they're putting everything they can muster behind it. Does all of this really paint the picture of a company ready to throw in the towel on 3DS as it is?? It doesn't to me. To me, Nintendo look like they're putting all the weight they can behind the 3DS, to turn it from an underwhelming console to a successful console. They aren't just relying on their in-house software and price cuts, either, they seem to be reaching out to their third party partners. We'll only know for sure what the rest of Nintendo's rescue plan looks like after the 13th, but I don't believe it'll involve a revised 3DS, let alone a system that ditches the name and downgrades the 3D capabilities of the console.

Nintendo are going to push 3DS as far as they can--if all that fails, and third party support and Nintendo's IP's don't sell the system, then they'll go back to the drawing board, but that would be the absolute, last resort.

Posted:3 years ago

#6

Jim Webb Executive Editor/Community Director, E-mpire Ltd. Co.

2,283 2,491 1.1
If they don't do a new model, they should bundle the new slide pad peripheral with the 3DS. Lack of a second slide pad has been a developer issue since the console was unveiled. It also allows it to ensure more games and even whole genre support such as those that work best with dual sticks.

Posted:3 years ago

#7

Yiannis Koumoutzelis Founder & Creative Director, Neriad Games

363 207 0.6
Something that not many have noticed, or pointed out, is that the second stick and extra buttons, were not added just because 3DS needed them in order for developers to make great games on it, BUT moreso, to fulfil its purpose as a possible extra controller for the WiiU in the future which Nintendo had mentioned that they are trying to find a solution in order to make it happen. Perhaps this is part of this solution. How could this be possible if it had only one analog and only 2 shoulder buttons?

"I'm getting addicted to the 3D visuals. I'm finding it such an enhanced gameplay experience, I am struggling to play it in 2D mode at all. "

Very well said! 3D gaming IS an advancement but mostly i would say in visuals. The overall experience. Not gameplay. It's something like the cherry on top! However I agree with you . It's not only depth but also definition that is added to your characters and environment.

Lack of a second slide is not really a huge issue. Given that there were lots of fps games on DS even without one! However an additional one IS very much welcome!

What i find as the largest shortcoming not only for 3DS but Nintendo's line of hardware in general, is a modern, solid online feature set and functionality. The browser is poor, Opera was much better, and the eshop is still struggling to find the proper format as well as the right type of experiences for the new handheld. It is slowly improving though. I would like to see another generous update of firmware some time before Christmas, but probably it is not going to happen.

The lack of options for social user to user interaction and otherwise such as video conference, VoIP, or even chat is sad. Pictochat was simply awesome and all Nintendo had to do was turn it into a real, proper chat system. Something they didn't! StreetPass tries to cover for the lack of digital social features, by offering real life social features trying once more as they did for wii, to get people to play together, even if they don't have to actually do something about it. It even lacks the option to upload your photos to facebook like DSi did!!!

Anyway we can discuss about the good and bad things of 3DS for pages, IMO the 3DS is a nice platform to develop on, and i would love to make a game for it. Vita seems to be a better choice atm though. Unfortunately 3DS has too much negative publicity around it. And that is something Nintendo has to work very hard to reverse. Also i find my ipad more and more offering to me experiences that i would expect from dsiware, and eshop. It takes significant time from my every day gaming. And although i prefer playing on my 3DS the amount of games that come out at this point simply can't keep up with my gaming habits. I hope for the sake of handheld gaming 3DS succeeds. I would hate to see my 3DS collecting dust. It is such a good device that it would be a pity to fail.

A generous redesign, with a retirement scheme especially for ambassadors would help a lot, but i don't think the investors would like that. :D

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Yiannis Koumoutzelis on 10th September 2011 12:26am

Posted:3 years ago

#8

James McWhirter Graduate, BSc Economics

1 0 0.0
A good read, this. Makes me wonder if Ninty will announce a redesigned 3DS with the second Circle Pad on the 13th, which could potentially launch alongside Monster Hunter to usher in a new wave of 3DS adopters.

After all, if they had plans to announce the Circle Pad add-on (via Famitsu) this week, surely it'd mean something bigger during the next week? I'm also wondering whether this is also the reason as to Nintendo's splitting up of the ambassador games for early adopters. Perhaps the second set of (brilliant) GBA games will arrive shortly after the announcement of a redesign. Maybe not, though, especially when the original 3DS has barely been around for a year and the last thing we consumers and owners need is more uncertainty with regards to the platform.

Since Konami have received the second Circle Pad add-on (possibly the reason behind the delay for Metal Gear Solid 3D in the west, since Japan may be the only region to receive the add-on?), it does seem like it'll be something future games will be using, rather than a Monster Hunter specific attachment, so a redesign with a second Circle Pad is more likely than I once thought.

What did interest me the most was the mention of the possibility of Nintendo essentially buying exclusives off third parties - something Nintendo previously said they don't like doing back in the GameCube era, with a preference on partnerships to make games like Donkey Konga, F Zero GX etc. They do seem very third party-centric this generation, with the Circle Pad add-on itself no doubt being the result of requests from developers, and themselves delaying their own games so third parties could have the limelight (a bit of a botched decision considering the best third party titles just weren't ready in time for the launch window).

It's great to see all this third party support, though, but I still have fears it'll only really translate well to the Japanese market in the short term. Over here in Europe/Australia (and to a similar extent North America) 3DS has had a barren release schedule since launch, with few of the third party system sellers Japanese 3DS owners have enjoyed.

Games like Tales of the Abyss, that new Capcom IP (keep forgetting its name) and Doctor Lautrec are still missing, for example, and a lot of the big third party sellers arriving this fall in Japan are again aimed at an audience which wouldn't exist here, like New LovePlus.

Metal Gear Solid 3D's out this year in the region too (perhaps the delay in the west is related to this Circle Pad add-on?), but suffice to say buying a 3DS in Japan's a much better prospect, especially when the eShop actually has compelling 3DS-exclusive content, like Picross E and VectorRacing.

Of course, Ninty's own system sellers will be released worldwide, but the more games the better, really, especially when a lot of these third party releases would shift systems, like Tales of the Abyss.

Edited 2 times. Last edit by James McWhirter on 10th September 2011 1:57am

Posted:3 years ago

#9

Patrick Frost QA Project Monitor

407 205 0.5
@Yiannis: I totally agree about using it as a Wii U controller as I had very much the same thought myself. It would make a lot more sense if there was an additional reason for such a drastic move.

However I still think Nintendo need to start addressing their relationships in the west. Not just for the 3DS but for the Wii U. Why are we not hearing about Bioshock, Borderlands 2, Skyrim etc. being released on the system? Surely many of these, considering their inventory systems, would be a perfect fit.

Posted:3 years ago

#10

Daniel Hughes Studying PhD Literary Modernism, Bangor University

436 496 1.1
I genuinely don't think the second analog slider is necessary for great games on the system--the DS managed fine without any analog sticks, and the PSP did very well with only one analog stick. The type of experiences that require two sticks--FPS games being the most common--are only big genres on home consoles. The 3DS doesn't need big home console games, it needs great portable experiences--that's what held the PSP back and allowed DS to flourish. Whereas PSP was initially filled with games replicating home console experiences on a small screen, the DS focused on games that couldn't be done anywhere else and were truly portable experiences. That's where Nintendo's focus needs to be to sell 3DS. I don't think Nintendo themselves would see the need for a second stick--Nintendo have only ever utilised the second analog stick as a camera or as four extra buttons in their games. Those kinds of functions can be fulfilled through the use of the gyroscope and to a larger extent, the touch screen.

Granted, a second analog slider is a logical option if Nintendo want to use 3DS with Wii U, but the question that needs to be asked is how wide spread will this function be? The chances are a minority of users will use that function, so I don't think a redesigned 3DS would be on the cards for it. Certainly, the peripheral itself would position 3DS as a second Wii U pad quite adequately, without the need for a revision. That's something I hadn't thought of, but I still don't think a revision is coming.

I'm hoping that this press conference will focus on a solid software line up, with vague (if not definite) release dates for the biggest first and third party titles, and a renewed focus on online content--an increased effort on both Virtual Console and 3DS Ware, demos and an expansion of StreetPass and SpotPass wouldn't go amiss.

Posted:3 years ago

#11
I am hoping if a second gen 3Ds is on the cards, that the 3D projection field can have the distance doubled. The main challenge i find is having to crane the neck closer than normal compared to say reading a kindle or a paperback, and after 2-3 hours, one might feel a bit slightly stiff posturally

Posted:3 years ago

#12

Yiannis Koumoutzelis Founder & Creative Director, Neriad Games

363 207 0.6
Patrick, absolutely!
If they can't otherwise convince developers that there's a lot of money to be had and they should support each other in order to develop a better market for common good, then they should splurge some money i think :) that is one of the guaranteed ways to get a developer's attention these days :D

There is an ancient greek saying, "Athena's (the goddess) help is great but you should use your hands too" :D

Dr. Wong, IMO their biggest mistake hardware wise, is that they didn't make the device same size as DSiXL. In the time of tablets and larger screens, 3DS screen is a bit small imo. Also it is likely that if they tinker with the convergence point at this time, then previous titles might not work properly. :(

DSiXL is falsely accused of being too big. It is not. It's just the right size, perfect imo, and they should have made it the same. In that case the 250 wouldn't really feel expensive. I suspect many consumers directly link price with screen size. After playing on my XL for so long, i found it difficult to get back to 3DS. Even when the visuals and 3D were perfect. Now lets compare that with those who have experienced iPad or kindle etc. I would think someone who owns a kindle is quite possibly the kind of person who previously owned a DS. Also i feel they should have kept the same size for both screens as the original DS!

I have my hopes high for a new model of 3DS, i would buy it instantly. Given that it is done right this time round. People want to buy Nintendo products, but Nintendo failed to understand what appeals to consumers today.

Posted:3 years ago

#13

Yiannis Koumoutzelis Founder & Creative Director, Neriad Games

363 207 0.6
BTW You might be surprised of the success a game like love plus might have in the west!

There are tons of new games coming out for 3DS early 2012 and by the end of this year. Classic nintendo titles and big known franchises ofc, and games like these:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d0LsRjgUM...
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5-c8ViJidvI
">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5-c8ViJidvI
</a>
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gdNiuvuypH4
">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gdNiuvuypH4
</a>
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=edf2kX9y8UM
">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=edf2kX9y8UM
</a>
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X19vUOuqQo0
">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X19vUOuqQo0
</a>
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qs8HRmqjfxE
">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qs8HRmqjfxE
</a>

will breath a fresh air into gaming. Unfortunately they come a bit too late.. and god knows when they will come to the west. (good thing is, companies in japan start giving dual Voice Over options, Japanese and English on their Japanese versions, and i hope this practice will continue on big titles and prevent public outcries such as operation rainfall. some games even take years for a decision to be made on their localization)

Edited 1 times. Last edit by Yiannis Koumoutzelis on 10th September 2011 2:11pm

Posted:3 years ago

#14

Tony Johns

520 12 0.0
Hope that the 3DS can succeed when most people were too quick to consider it a failure.

There are still allot of gamers who are waiting until Christmas with new game releases before they get their 3DS,

So I do think that the shareholders are too quick to sell their Nintendo stock before the real success would come around.

Posted:3 years ago

#15

Tony Johns

520 12 0.0
It is unique games like Love Plus and other Japanese games is the reason why Region Locking should be abanded and become a thing of the past.

To deny western people from these amazing unique Japanese games in favor for realistic FPS shooters is just too criminal and turns off many Otaku gamers from getting the 3DS in my view.

Nintendo would do well to abandon the long practice of Region Lock in order to lift the sales and interest in 3DS games.

Posted:3 years ago

#16

Patrick Frost QA Project Monitor

407 205 0.5
Tony I'm sure that the West could really do with more rape play game or even better, JRPG publishers could gradually bankrupt themselves by spending a pile of gold on localising text heavy games that will sell only 20,000 copies.

Posted:3 years ago

#17
@ Yiannis the 3DS will be releasing titles into a console heavy blockbuster season in Sep - Dec. So, even though there may be some potentially good titles, my money is the 30-60 that the average gamer spends will be on some good console/PC titles at the very least. I'm not sure where the 3DS titles come within that budget.

Posted:3 years ago

#18

Curt Sampson Sofware Developer

596 360 0.6
Patrick, your view of Japan is rather distorted, to say the least.

But regardless, how much revenue is Nintendo making from region locking the DS? It seems to me that deliberately cutting off that market is rather pointless.

Posted:3 years ago

#19

Yiannis Koumoutzelis Founder & Creative Director, Neriad Games

363 207 0.6
Talk about all guns blazing!

This Nintendo conference was all about that!
Too many big news to link one by one... turns out most delayed games were delayed because of the pad. it will cost 1500 i guess $15 in us and eu.

this site has everything about the conference if you missed it. screens videos, etc.
nintendoeverything.com

Posted:3 years ago

#20

Yiannis Koumoutzelis Founder & Creative Director, Neriad Games

363 207 0.6
Dr. Wong you are right about that. It is something for nintendo to be concerned about. Even the new zelda game is coming out around that time and it seems that already it is one of the top pre-ordered games, however with all the new games they announced there are now so many good reasons to grab a 3DS. Not just in christmas, but any time. Speaking for myself, i buy at least 3 games every month,sometimes even more, so it won't be a problem. I am not in the majority group perhaps but I do not think i am the only one either.

Posted:3 years ago

#21

Patrick Frost QA Project Monitor

407 205 0.5
Haha!
@Curt I was being facetious!
Obviously there are the (very, VERY) few Japanese games that have a broad appeal to a western audience, that don't get released over here. However most of them are.

I just find it amusing the category of games that people think should be localised are usually of such niche appeal that they have little profitability attached, such as Captain Rainbow.

In terms of region locking, all publishers have specifcially timed localised launches for logistical and marketting reasons. So region locking is important for them to release their products properly, especially when it comes to measuring demand and therefore projecting production. Grey markets have a very large impact on that.

Also, on a legal point, all platform holders have separate submission processes for each region because there are differences in the legal responsibilities for each of those regions. Without having a blanket submission process that covers all territories and insures that games are localised in all languages at very first release then those platform holders cannot insure the standards of their games or fulfill their legal responsibilities.

Posted:3 years ago

#22

Rolf Moren Freelance Marketing Consultant

36 22 0.6
It seems many of you forget one important thing about this whole stick add-on thing. Nintendo, one of the few companies that, throughout history, always have been able to make "day one" money on their hardware, was forced to lower the price point quite substantially. Now they release an add-on that is mostly plastic and very little electronics for a price of 12+ USD. My guess is that the margins on this thing is quite pleasing for the Nintendo bean counter department. This is salesmanship at its best!

Posted:3 years ago

#23
@ Yiannis - I find it hard to complete one game over a few weeks to months, so prudent logic says I should only really purchase something I'm going to finish in a few sittings, and check out the bargain bucket when I'm ready to have time to play some more. Sometimes the more you work in games the less you play, if ever at all.

Posted:3 years ago

#24

Curt Sampson Sofware Developer

596 360 0.6
Patrick, all the issues you discuss can clearly be dealt with without region locking, as proved for more than half a decade now by Sony on both handheld and home console platforms.

Posted:3 years ago

#25

Login or register to post

Take part in the GamesIndustry community

Register now